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  • 1.
    Alatalo, Tarja
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Educational Work.
    Meier, Joanna
    Frank, Elisabeth
    Linnéuniversitetet.
    Transition between Swedish preschool and preschool class: a question about interweaving care and knowledge2016In: Early Childhood Education Journal, ISSN 1082-3301, E-ISSN 1573-1707, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 155-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study highlights teachers’ experiences with transition from Swedish preschool to preschool class, i. e. from the daycare centre to the formal school. One assumption was that transition activities, to favour continuity in the long-term, need to focus on children’s learning within the target areas that the policy documents specify for preschool. Empirical data were collected through a combination of a questionnaire and interviews. The study shows that transition activities occur between institutions. These are in place to allow for a safe transition for children rather than to allow for continuous and long-term learning in the target areas in the curriculum. Care for children and beliefs about the types of school activities have an impact on the activities and standpoints in the transition processes. Professional assessment of children’s learning and the need for greater consensus within various types of schools in terms of the learning of the individual child in different fields are discussed.

  • 2. Maryam, Bourbour
    et al.
    Sören, Högberg
    Lindqvist, Gunilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Education. University of Uppsala.
    Putting Scaffolding Into Action: Preschool Teachers’ Actions Using Interactive Whiteboard2020In: Early Childhood Education Journal, ISSN 1082-3301, E-ISSN 1573-1707, Vol. 48, no 1, p. 79-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore preschool teachers’ actions in order to support children’s learning processes in a context where an interactive whiteboard (IWB) is used. Five preschool teachers and 22 children aged 4–6 were video observed in 2017 and early spring 2018 over a period of 5 months. The findings of the study revealed 21 scaffolding actions which preschool teachers used including: Concretizing, Questioning, Instructing, Providing space, Affirming, Providing feedback, Inviting, Watching, Laughing together, Approaching, Standing/sitting beside, Simplifying, Filling in the blanks, Confirming, Participating, Challenging perception, Challenging thought, Explaining facts, Displaying, Explaining solutions, and Referring back. By characterizing teachers’ actions in relation to different scaffolding functions, the relationship between action and scaffolding function was particularly clarified. Six of the functions, including recruitment, direction maintenance, marking critical features, reduction in degrees of freedom, frustration control and demonstration were aligned with Wood et al.’s (Child Psychol Psychiatry 17:88–100, 1976) theoretical framework. By identifying two additional functions, i.e., mutual enjoyment and participation in the activity, more importantly the study contributed to the development of Wood et al.’s (Child Psychol Psychiatry 17:88–100, 1976) theoretical framework. It can be said that the findings of the study expanded and deepened our understanding regarding scaffolding processes and the ways they can be implemented in teaching practices.

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CiteExportLink to result list
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  • Other style
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