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  • 1.
    Backman, Erik
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan GIH Stockholm.
    Moving beyond rigid orthodoxies in the teaching and assessment of movement in Swedish physical education teacher education: A student perspective2020In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 111-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to analyse and discuss physical education teacher education (PETE) students’ conceptions of teaching and assessment of movement capability as a part of content knowledge in aquatics, dance and ice-skating at a university in Sweden. The theoretical perspective involves Shulman’s concept of content knowledge, the further elaboration of content knowledge into common content knowledge, and the theoretical perspective underpinning movement capability. The sample consists of two groups with a total of seven PETE students who volunteered to take part in group interviews. Semi-structured interviews with the two groups were conducted on three occasions. Findings display that the students’ conceptions of movement capability seem to be focused around performance of movements. Further, the participants felt the messages to be unclear in terms of what they are to know regarding movement capability before entering PETE. There was also a contradiction in that the PETE students felt it to be obvious that they would ‘know’ certain movements, and at the same time they requested clear and distinct criteria when it came to the performance of movements. This study shows that expectations in terms of PETEstudents’ levels of movement content knowledge need to be further investigated and discussed.

    This study also highlights the importance of conceptualising what PETE students need to learn if they are to see the need to develop their movement capability on their own. Assessments of students’ reflections on what it means to master movements are discussed as an alternative to assessment of performance of movements.

  • 2.
    Backman, Erik
    et al.
    Gymnastik- och idrottshögskolan, GIH, Forskningsgruppen för pedagogik, idrott och fritidskultur.
    Pearson, Phil
    University of Wollongong Australien.
    ‘We should assess the students in more authentic situations’: Swedish PE teacher educators’ views of the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers2016In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 47-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of what knowledge a student of Physical Education (PE) needs to develop during PE teacher education (PETE) was recently discussed. One form of knowledge is the movement practices that students must meet during their education. Given the limited time, a delicate matter is whether to prioritize movement knowledge and consider it as subject matter knowledge (e.g. performance of the freestyle stroke) or as pedagogical content knowledge (e.g. teaching how to perform the freestyle stroke). The aim is to investigate Swedish PE teacher educators’ views on the meaning of movement skills for future PE teachers and to analyse the learning cultures made visible in the ways the meaning of movement is expressed. We conducted interviews with 12 teachereducators and collected documents with tasks for assessment from five PETE universities in Sweden. Inspired by Bourdieu’s field metaphor, and particularly its use by Hodkinson et al. on learning cultures, we then analysed the collected material. In the results, different views on the meaning of movement skills are made visible. The PE teacher can be seen as an instructor, as well as a facilitator of movements. Movement skills can be seen as essential for a teacher in PE, as well as valuable but not essential. Movement quality can also be viewed as universal, as well as contextual. Swedish teacher educators in PE appear to ascribe value to all the positions made visible in this study. These results are discussed from the perspectives of epistemology, assessment and learning cultures.

  • 3.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science. Stockholm University, CeHum.
    Exploring ‘knowings’ in human movement: The practical knowledge of pole-vaulters2014In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 72-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to explore and develop ways to describe what there is to know, from the perspective of the knower, when knowing how to carry out a complex movement. The paper will challenge the distinction between mental and physical skills, drawing on theories of tacit knowing (Polanyi, 1969), knowing how (Ryle, 1949), and knowing-in-action (Schön, 1991) together with empirical data from the context of elite sport. One assumption is that exploring knowing in moving in this context can contribute to developing students’ movement education in physical education.

      Pole-vaulting provides examples of what there is to know in terms of embodied capabilities possible to explicate and develop as an educational objective in physical education, irrespective of the context of competitive sports. Explicating the knowing (or capabilities) involved in the ‘capability to move’, as exemplified in this study could emphasize an educational aim concerning practical knowledge such as knowing in moving, and not necessarily specific skills related to competitive sport activities.

     

  • 4.
    Nyberg, Gunn
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    Backman, Erik
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    Larsson, Håkan
    Gymnastik- och Idrottshögskolan.
    Exploring the meaning of movement capability in physical education teacher education through student voices2019In: European Physical Education Review, ISSN 1356-336X, E-ISSN 1741-2749, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 144-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scholars argue that movement content knowledge in physical education teacher education (PETE) needs to be revisited and problematised. In this paper we develop the concept of movement capability representing a widened view of movement content knowledge. If teacher educators want to teach movement capability as an intrinsic educational goal in PETE there is an apparent need to consider what to teach, how it is taught and also how movement capability is understood by the learners. The aim of this paper is to analyse how PETE students experience the meaning of movement capability through the teaching in aquatics, dance and ice-skating. This study takes its departure from a number of previous empirical studies investigating the meaning of movement capability. Interviews with seven PETE students, divided into two focus groups, were conducted on three occasions. A phenomenographic analysis shows four qualitatively different ways of experiencing the meaning of movement capability. Major differences that can be seen when comparing the results of a previous study on physical education teachers and students in PETE are the aspect of subjective experiences and the aspect of the observer. In the main, the students do not seem to take into account an observer’s point of view to the same extent as the group of teachers. The results will hopefully contribute to a deeper and more complex understanding of what can be seen as movement capability in PETE and physical education, and thereby enhance development of the teaching and learning of this capability.

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