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  • 1.
    Jäder, Jonas
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education. Linköping University.
    Sidenvall, Johan
    Linköping University; School Administration, Municipality of Hudiksvall.
    Sumpter, Lovisa
    Department of Mathematics and Science Education, Stockholm University.
    Students’ Mathematical Reasoning and Beliefs in Non-routine Task Solving2016In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Beliefs and problem solving are connected and have been studied in different contexts. One of the common results of previous research is that students tend to prefer algorithmic approaches to mathematical tasks. This study explores Swedish upper secondary school students’ beliefs and reasoning when solving non-routine tasks. The results regarding the beliefs indicated by the students were found deductively and include expectations, motivational beliefs and security. When it comes to reasoning, a variety of approaches were found. Even though the tasks were designed to demand more than imitation of algorithms, students used this method and failed to solve the task. © 2016 Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan

  • 2.
    Olsson, Jan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education. Umeå universitet.
    The Contribution of Reasoning to the Utilization of Feedback from Software When Solving Mathematical Problems2017In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, p. 1-21Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Sumpter, Lovisa
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    ‘Boys press all the buttons and hope it will help’: Upper secondary school teachers’ gendered conceptions about students’ mathematical reasoning2016In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 14, no 8, p. 1535-1552Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous results show that Swedish upper secondary school teachers attribute gender to cases describing different types of mathematical reasoning. The purpose of this study was to investigate how these teachers gender stereotype aspects of students’ mathematical reasoning by studying the symbols that were attributed to boys and girls, respectively, in a written questionnaire. The results from the content analysis showed that girls were attributed gender symbols including insecurity, use of standard methods and imitative reasoning, and boys were assigned symbols such as multiple strategies especially on the calculator, guessing and chance-taking.

  • 4.
    Sumpter, Lovisa
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    Investigating upper secondary school teachers’ conceptions: is mathematical reasoning considered gendered?2016In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 14, no s2, p. 347-362Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines Swedish upper secondary school teachers’ gendered conceptions about students’ mathematical reasoning: whether reasoning was considered gendered and, if so, which type of reasoning was attributed to girls and boys. The sample consisted of 62 teachers from six different schools from four different locations in Sweden. The results showed that boys were significantly more often attributed to memorised reasoning and delimiting algorithmic reasoning. Girls were connected to gamiliar algorithmic reasoning, a reasoning type where you use standard method when solving a mathematical task. Creative mathematical founded reasoning, which is novel, plausible and founded in mathematical properties, was not considered gendered.

  • 5.
    Sumpter, Lovisa
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    Themes and interplay of beliefs in mathematical reasoning2013In: International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, ISSN 1571-0068, E-ISSN 1573-1774, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 1115-1135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Upper secondary students’ task solving reasoning was analysed with a focus on arguments for strategy choices and conclusions. Passages in their arguments for reasoning that indicated the students’ beliefs were identified and, by using a thematic analysis, categorized. The results stress three themes of beliefs used as arguments for central decisions: safety, expectations and motivation. Arguments such as ‘I don’t trust my own reasoning’, ‘mathematical tasks should be solved in a specific way’ and ‘using this specific algorithm is the only way for me to solve this problem’ exemplify these three themes. These themes of beliefs seem to interplay with each other, for instance in students’ strategy choices when solving mathematical tasks.

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