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  • 1.
    Asiimwe, Edgar Napoleon
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Lim, Nena
    Usability of government websites in Uganda2010In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Government websites offer great benefits to citizens and governments. Such benefits, however,cannot be realized if websites are unusable. This study investigates usability of government websites in Uganda.Using the feature investigation method, the study evaluated four Ugandan government websites according tothree perspectives. Results show that websites are partially usable in the design layout and navigationperspectives but are rather weak in stating legal policies. Evaluation results provide the Ugandan governmentwith a clear picture of what needs to be improved according to international website design standards. Moreover,the parsimonious evaluation framework proposed in the research is useful for any country that wants to do aquick and easy evaluation of their government websites.

  • 2.
    Avdic, Anders
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Lambrinos, Thomas
    Impera Kommunikation; Örebro universitet.
    Modeling and illustrating requirement prioritization in public e-service development from a value-based perspective2015In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major problem in e-service development is the prioritization of the requirements of different stakeholders. The main stakeholders are governments and their citizens, all of whom have different and sometimes conflicting requirements. In this paper, the prioritization problem is addressed by combining a value-based approach with an illustration technique. This paper examines the following research question: How can multiple stakeholder requirements be illustrated from a value-based perspective in order to be prioritizable? We used an e-service development case taken from a Swedish municipality to elaborate on our approach. Our contributions are: 1) a model of the relevant domains for requirement prioritization for government, citizens, technology, finances and laws and regulations; and 2) a requirement fulfillment analysis tool (RFA) that consists of a requirement-goal-value matrix (RGV), and a calculation and illustration module (CIM). The model reduces cognitive load, helps developers to focus on value fulfillment in e-service development and supports them in the formulation of requirements. It also offers an input to public policy makers, should they aim to target values in the design of e-services.

  • 3.
    Joseph, Shaji
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Avdic, Anders
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Where do e-Government strategies take the Nordic nations?2016In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 2-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An effective strategy is critical for the successful development of e-Government. The leading nations in the e-Government rankings include Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland. Their leading role makes them interesting to study when looking for reasons to successful e-Government. The purpose of this research paper is to describe the e-Government development strategies of Nordic countries, which rank highly on the international stage. In particular it aims to study the foci of these strategies. The approach is a document study of the e-Government development strategies of Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Finland was carried out using a qualitative content analysis inductive method. The results show that the major focus of Nordic e-Government strategies is on public sector reforms. Other focus areas include economic reforms and, to a lesser extent, e-Democracy efforts. Sweden, Finland and Norway have set ambitious policy goals in order to achieve global leadership in e-Government development. In response to the question posed by this paper’s title, we can say that Nordic e-Government strategies, except for Norway, focus more on reforming public sector services than on economic reforms.  E-Democracy reforms are hardly focused on at all.

    Practical implications: Public sector policy makers can relate their policy foci to some of the more successful e-Government countries in the world. Research implications/originality is that this paper can apart from the findings also provide a means on how to identify the actual foci of a country’s e-Government policy.

  • 4.
    Sefyrin, Johanna
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för informationsteknologi och medier.
    Mörtberg, Christina
    University of Oslo.
    "We do not talk about this" – Problematical silences in eGovernment2009In: Electronic Journal of e-Government, ISSN 1479-439X, E-ISSN 1479-439X, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 259-270Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish public sector is currently in a process of transformation, often referred to as eGovernment. In this paper stories are told of problematic silences in an eGovernment implementation project in a Swedish government agency. eGovernment is discussed as something that is articulated differently by a range of actors in various locations. This enables articulations of multiple eGovernment and the multiple articulations can also be a means to contest dominant and possibly problematic articulations of eGovernment. The dominant discourse of eGovernment is the rationalisation of the public sector as a means of saving public resources. The improvement of quality and availability of public services, and to improve democratic processes are central in the dominant discourse. In this discourse there is a silence about the dismissal of employees in the public sector. There is neither talk about how the public sector is an important labour market for women nor how the rationalisation will affect the employees. Employees’ knowledges are not considered as being a resource for strategic IT-planning, and thus they are not invited to participate in the further design of IT-systems. The purpose of the paper is to explore the participation of the administrative officers in an eGovernment implementation project, and the meanings of eGovernment articulated in the project. Ethnographic methods were used in the collection of empirical material, and central ideas in participatory design and feminist technoscience were used in the analysis. The main argument is that the administrative officers participated in an ambiguous way. They were central actors but were at the same time marginalised within the organisation. The ambiguity regarding how they participated is related to different and more inclusive articulations of eGovernment in the project. The paper is concluded with a discussion concerning how alternative articulations of eGovernment can offer alternatives to the dominant eGovernment discourse.

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