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  • 1. Grooten, W.
    et al.
    Müller, M.
    Forsman, M.
    Kjellberg, K.
    Toomingas, A.
    Äng, Björn
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science. Karolinska institutet.
    Svartengren, M.
    Health risk appraisals in Swedish occupational health services2016In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 849-859Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Health risk appraisals (HRAs) in occupational health services (OHS) in Sweden are very commonly used for health promotion issues, but not much research has explored the extent and nature of individual feedback that is provided. 

    OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to describe and explore HRAs in OHS regarding the content of the feedback in relation to the individual status and overall employee satisfaction. 

    METHODS: Feedback (evaluation and advice) and employee satisfaction with HRA were studied in employees that participated in health risk appraisals with a specific feedback session (HRA-F) (n = 272) and employees that participated in a single session (HRA-S) (n = 104). Associations between feedback and individual status concerning life style were assessed with Cohen's kappa (k). 

    RESULTS: The employees received mainly information and advice for improvement on health and lifestyle issues (89-100%), while advice for improvement of working conditions was less common (15-59%). The feedback provided on life style was not based on individual status (k < 0.4), except for smoking and risky alcohol consumption (k > 0.55). A great majority of employees reported good overall satisfaction with their HRAs. 

    CONCLUSIONS: The evaluation and feedback given to employees after HRAs should be based more on HRA-results and advice could be focused more on work-related factors.

  • 2.
    Lundgren, Lina
    et al.
    Biological and Environmental Systems, Halmstad University.
    Brorsson, Sofia
    Biological and Environmental Systems, Halmstad University.
    Osvalder, Anna-Lisa
    Biological and Environmental Systems, Halmstad University; Division of Design and Human Factors, Chalmers University of Technology.
    Comfort aspects important for the performance and safety of kitesurfing.2012In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 41, no Suppl 1, p. 1221-1225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equipment used in sports is of great importance, especially when the equipment is in direct contact with the athlete or is important for safety. In the sport kitesurfing environmental factors and the equipment design are crucial for the comfort and safety. The participants' choice and opinion of equipment can show which factors are considered most important for the performance and to reduce risk for injury. This study has evaluated self-reported information from the participants about what equipment they use, comfort of the equipment and if the equipment has contributed to any injuries. The methods used were questionnaires (n=206) and interviews (n=17), which in combination allows to assess the problem both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results showed that supported leading edge kites are most frequently used, with a waist harness and foot straps to attach the feet. The choice of kite type was mainly based on the discipline of riding for the respondent. Some issues concerning comfort of riding and injury risk the respondents did relate to the design of harness and foot straps. The information from this study can be used for development strategies for industry manufacturers and for further studies in the area of equipment design and biomechanics.

  • 3.
    Millet, Patrick
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap.
    Sandberg, Karl W
    Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för informationsteknologi och medier.
    Individual status at the start of rehabilitation: Implications for vocational rehabilitation programs2003In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 20, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Millet, Patrick
    et al.
    Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap.
    Sandberg, Karl W
    Time for change: Can empowerment be a solution to meet the perils of modern day working life?2005In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 291-295Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Working life continues to undergo rapid change. This change creates greater demand and sophistication and causes employees to experience more pressure, professionally and personally. Thus, absences from work due to sickness and injuries increase. In Sweden, this problem has become serious. This article argues that psychological empowerment and individual control are two key factors that minimize the many perils faced by the modern worker and those seeking to return to the work force through the vocational rehabilitation process. The findings show that a shift in ideology is needed. Specifically, there must be a shift from scientific management and Weberian bureaucracy towards organizational structures, routines, and cultures that support and increase individual worker psychological empowerment and control.

  • 5.
    Rydell, Alexis
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Bernsand, Carl-Olof
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Rosén, Gunnar
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Work environment investments: Critical elements for success in optimizing occupational health and safety effects2019In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assessment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 64, no 1, p. 107-116Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: A considerable amount of money is invested annually in workplaces to promote creative, comfortable and safe work environments. The processes and effects of these investments are however not sufficiently studied.

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article is to examine work environment investment processes and identify organizational critical elements for optimizing investment in terms of occupational health and safety effects for employees.

    METHODS: Twelve case studies were conducted in different sectors. The data was collected through interviews, by studying available documents, and, in several cases, observations and measurement of hazards by means of the PIMEX-method. 

    RESULTS: The empirical results yielded seven different critical elements for work environment investment processes. The critical elements identified were: identifying the need, risk assessment, involvement of staff, consultation with OHS expertise, procurement and delivery, implementation and training of workers, and evaluation.

    CONCLUSIONS: The critical elements have wide similarities with steps outlined in Swedish Work Environment Management processes, and ideas described in the Plan-Do-Act-Check model. If organizations follow this process, they are provided with improved possibilities for maximizing invested money for a safer working environment.

  • 6.
    Sandberg, Karl W
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science. Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för informationsteknologi och medier.
    Gardelli, Åsa
    Stubbs, Jonathan
    The use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the rehabilitation of individuals with severe functional impairments in a municipal care service system2005In: Work: A journal of Prevention, Assesment and rehabilitation, ISSN 1051-9815, E-ISSN 1875-9270, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 229-238Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the development of a scheme to use Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the training of individuals with severe functional impairments. Computers were used as an integral part of a rehabilitation programme for training, and the authors found that the resource was a useful addition to other treatment methods. This article describes the development and subsequent setting up of computers for training and how the study progressed. The study used a somewhat unique bottom up approach that first trained care-giving staff in computer skills. The caregivers in turn worked with and trained some of those they served. This learning strategy drew upon the concept of learning, empowerment and the motivation of all involved in a system and process. The study found that by using ICT all involved felt a greater sense of empowerment and improvement in the quality of life. That caregivers were involved at all stages was valuable in that they felt an ownership of the process and that they also benefited from being involved because they also learned new skills.

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