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  • 1.
    Carling, Kenneth
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Statistics.
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Rudholm, Niklas
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Economics.
    Optimal retail location and CO2-emissions2013In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 20, no 14, p. 1357-1361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the p-median model is used to find the location of retail stores that minimizes CO2-emissions from consumer travel. The optimal location is then compared with the existing retail location,and the excess CO2-emissions compared with the optimal solution is calculated. The results show that by using the environmentally optimal location, CO2-emissions from consumer travel could be reduced by approximately 25 per cent.

  • 2.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    et al.
    The Swedish Retail Institute (HUI) , SE-103 29, Stockholm, Sweden; The Department of Economics , University of Gävle , SE-801 76, Gävle, Sweden.
    Rudholm, Niklas
    The Swedish Retail Institute (HUI) , SE-103 29, Stockholm, Sweden; The Department of Economics , University of Gävle , SE-801 76, Gävle, Sweden.
    Revenues as a Proxy for Profits: A Cautionary Note2009In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 16, no 7, p. 679-681Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the entry literature, researchers sometimes use revenues as a proxy for profits because this is the only data available. Doing so could seriously bias the results.

  • 3.
    Li, Yujiao
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Microdata Analysis.
    Håkansson, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Mihaescu, Oana
    HUI Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rudholm, Niklas
    HUI Research, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Agglomeration economies in urban retailing: Are there productivity spillovers when big-box retailers enter urban markets?2019In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have found that big-box retail entry does not affect the productivity of incumbent retailers when entry occurs in urban areas. In this paper, we show that there are positive spillover effects of big-box retail entry to incumbent retailers in urban areas as well, but that these are limited to relatively small retailers, making the effects difficult to detect using traditional econometric methods, such as difference-in-difference estimation on the full sample of firms. In a two-step procedure, we first use panel smooth transition regression to determine size thresholds that delimit incumbent retail firms by their possible reactions to the new big-box entry. We then use difference-in-difference estimations on these subgroups of firms to determine, within each group, the direction and magnitude of the effects of big-box entry on their productivity. For the group of small incumbent retailers, we find positive spillover effects on productivity of approximately 9%.

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