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  • 1.
    Carlsson, Per
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Bexell, Ulf
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Friction and Wear Mechanisms of Thin Organic Permanent Coatings Deposited on Hot-Dip Coated Steel2001In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 247, no 1, p. 88-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adhesive wear, generally defined as ‘wear due to localised bonding between contacting solid surfaces leading to material transfer between the two surfaces or loss from either surface’ is a common phenomenon in many sliding contact tribosystems, e.g. sheet metal forming operations. In these operations, galling, i.e. seizure of the sheet surface caused by transfer of sheet material to the tool surface, is frequently a problem since it may results in scratching of the formed sheet surface and eventually cracking and fracture of the product due to high friction forces. In order to reduce the coefficient of friction and the galling tendency in sheet metal forming operations thin organic coatings has been introduced on the market with the intention of improving the performance of hot-dip coated steel sheet. In summary, these coatings have the potential to increase the formability without additional lubrication and serve as temporary corrosion protection during transportation. In the present study, the friction and wear mechanisms of five different thin organic permanent coatings deposited on hot-dip coated (Zn and 55% Al–Zn) steel sheet is evaluated by modified scratch testing. The results obtained show that this test method permits easy and reproducible evaluation of the tribological properties of thin organic coatings. Further, these coatings show a high potential when it comes to improve the formability of hot-dip coated steel. The results obtained are discussed in relation to the identified friction and wear mechanisms.

  • 2.
    Fallqvist, Mikael
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    The influence of surface defects on the mechanical and tribological properties of VN-based arc-evaporated coatings2013In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 297, no 1-2, p. 1111-1119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of surface defects, i.e., droplets and craters, on the mechanical and tribological properties of arc-evaporated VxN coatings deposited on cemented carbide has been investigated in a scratching contact using a diamond stylus and a sliding contact using a stainless steel pin. Post-test characterisation using 3D optical surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy was performed in order to investigate the mechanical and tribological response of the coatings. The results show that scratch induced coating cracking mainly is restricted to larger droplets showing a low interfacial bonding to the adjacent coating matrix. The influence of coating defects on the cohesive strength, i.e., the tendency to chipping of small coating fragments, was found to be relatively small. In contrast, the presence of defects may have a significant impact on the interfacial adhesive strength, increasing the tendency to spalling. In sliding contact, surface defects such as droplets and craters have a strong impact on the tribological behaviour of the coatings causing abrasive wear of the less hard counter material surface and material transfer to the coating, both mechanisms affecting the friction characteristics of sliding contact tribo systems.

  • 3.
    Fallqvist, Mikael
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Ruppi, Sakari
    Abrasive wear of multilayer kappa-Al2O3-Ti(C,N) CVD coatings on cemented carbide2007In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 263, no 1-6, p. 74-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the present study the wear resistance of kappa-Al2O3–Ti(C,N) multilayer CVD coatings with different multilayer structures (8, 15, 32 layers of kappa-Al2O3 separated by thin Ti(C,N) layers) have been investigated using a micro-abrasion and a cutting test. The results show that the wear rate of the kappa-Al2O3 multilayer coatings tend to decrease with decreasing layer thickness in the micro-abrasion test and decrease with increasing layer thickness in the cutting tests. The reason for this is mainly due to the difference in wear behaviour depending on temperature. The results obtained are discussed in relation to the dominant wear mechanisms of the coatings which have been identified using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The potential of the micro-abrasion test in the characterisation of thin CVD coatings for cutting tool applications is discussed.

  • 4.
    Fallqvist, Mikael
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Schultheiss, F
    Lunds Universitet.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    M’Sauobi, R
    Seco Tools.
    Ståhl, J E
    Lunds Universitet.
    Influence of CVD Al2O3 coated tool surface micro topography on the tribological characteristics in metal cutting: part I2013In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, p. 87-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of surface micro topography of CVD α-Al2O3 coatings, deposited on cemented carbide inserts, on tribological characteristics in sliding contact and in metal cutting has been investigated using quenched and tempered steel as counter/work material. Pin-on-disc and turning tests were carried out and post-test characterization using 3D optical surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy was performed in order to investigate the tribological response of the coatings. The results show that surface micro topography can have a significant impact on the tribological performance of Al2O3 coatings under initial and cutting contact conditions. For both kinds of tests the tendency for transfer of workpiece material strongly increases with increasing coating micro topography. In the pin-on-disc tests, a smooth coating surface significantly reduces the friction coefficient. In the turning tests the contact conditions at the flank face increase with decreasing micro topography. In contrast, no general conclusions can be drawn regarding the influence of coating micro topography on the contact conditions at the rake face. The resulting topography of the turned surface was found to increase with increasing coating topography.

  • 5.
    Harlin, Peter
    et al.
    Sandvik Materials Technology.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Abrasive wear resistance of starch consolidated and sintered high speed steel2009In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 267, no 9-10, p. 1482-1489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The abrasive wear resistance of starch consolidated (SC) and super solidus liquid phase sintered (SLPS) M3/2 high speed steel (HSS) samples have been evaluated by a two-body micro-abrasion test (low stress abrasion), using 6 µm diamond abrasive particles, and a three-body abrasion test (high stress abrasion), using significantly larger abrasive particles of blast furnace slag (600 HV) and silicon carbide (2400 HV), respectively. In the tests a commercial powder metallurgical (PM) HSS was used as a reference material. The results show that the microstructure of the SC and SLPS HSS samples is strongly dependent on the sintering temperature used. With increasing temperature the microstructure ranges from a porous (5% porosity) relatively fine grained low temperature sintered microstructure to a fully dense relatively coarse grained high temperature sintered microstructure with eutectic carbides/carbide networks. However, despite the pronounced microstructural differences displayed by the as-sintered HSS microstructures these show a relatively high abrasive wear resistance, comparable with that of a HIPed HSS reference, both under low and high stress abrasion contact conditions. The characteristic features of the low and high temperature sintered microstructures, i.e. the pores and coarse eutectic carbides/carbide networks, only show a limited impact on the wear rate and the wear mode (dominant wear mechanism). The results obtained imply that near net shaped components manufactured by starch consolidation and super solidus liquid phase sintering might be of interest in tribological applications.

  • 6.
    Heinrich, Jannica
    et al.
    Tribomaterials Group, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Tribomaterials Group, The Ångstrom Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Jenei, Istvan Zoltan
    Instrumentation Physics, Stockholm University.
    Jacobson, Staffan
    Tribomaterials Group, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University.
    Transfer of titanium in sliding contacts: new discoveries and insights revealed by in situ studies in the SEM2014In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 315, no 1-2, p. 87-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Titanium and its alloys generally display poor tribological properties in sliding contacts due to their high chemical activity and strong adhesion to the counter surface. The strong adhesion causes a high tendency to transfer and ultimately galling or build-up edge formation, resulting in severe surface damage. As a result, forming and machining of titanium and its alloys are generally associated with significant problems such as high friction, rapid tool wear and poor surface finish of the formed/machined surface.

    In the present study, in situ tests in a scanning electron microscope have been performed to increase the understanding of the mechanisms controlling the initial transfer of titanium (Grade 2) in sliding contact with tool surfaces. Tool materials included cover cold work tool steel, cemented carbide, CVD deposited Al2O3and PVD deposited DLC. In these tests, a relatively sharp tip, representing the titanium work material, slides against a flat surface, representing the tool. The contact conditions result in plastic deformation of the work material against the tool surface, thereby simulating forming or machining. The limited and well-defined contact, along with the possibility to study the sliding in the SEM, makes it possible to correlate local surface variations to transfer of work material and frictional response. Post-test characterization of the contact surfaces was performed by high-resolution SEM, TEM, EDS and EELS.

    The initial friction was low and stable against all tested materials, but then gradually escalated against all surfaces except the DLC. The friction escalation was associated to increasing levels of transfer, while the DLC stayed virtually free from transfer. From these very initial sliding tests DLC is a promising tool coating in forming and machining of titanium.

  • 7.
    Heinrichs, J
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Jacobson, S
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Influence of tool steel microstructure on initial material transfer in metal forming: in situ studies in the SEM2013In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 302, no 1-2, p. 1249-1256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal forming constitutes a group of industrially important processes to form metallic components to net shape. When forming aluminium and other materials that tend to stick to the tools, problems associated with material transfer, e.g. galling, may occur. In a previous study by the present authors, in situ observations of aluminium transfer during sliding contact in the SEM revealed that the surface topography and chemical composition of the tool steel counter surface have a strong impact on the initial material transfer tendency. Even if carefully polished to a very smooth surface (Ra<50 nm), transfer of aluminium was found to immediately take place on a very fine scale and preferentially to the surface irregularities presented by the slightly protruding M(C,N) particles (height 15 nm) in the tool steel. In contrast, the less protruding M6C carbides, as well as the martensitic steel matrix exhibited very little initial transfer. The mechanism behind the preferential pick-up tendency displayed by the M(C,N) particles was not fully understood and it was not possible to determine if the decisive mechanism operates on the microstructural scale, the nanoroughness scale or the chemical bonding scale. In the present study, these mechanisms have been further investigated and analysed by comparing the very initial stages of material transfer onto different types of tool steels in sliding contact with aluminium in the SEM. The tool steels investigated cover conventional ingot cast and powder metallurgy steel grades, selected to possess a range of different types, amounts and sizes of hard phase particles, including MC, M(C,N), M7C3 and M6C. The transfer mechanisms are investigated using high resolution SEM, and the differences between the different microstructures and carbide types are carefully analysed. The implications for real metal forming are discussed.

  • 8.
    Heinrichs, J.
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Uppsala universitet.
    Jacobson, S.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Surface degradation of cemented carbides in scratching contact with granite and diamond: the roles of microstructure and composition2015In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 342, p. 210-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cemented carbides are composite materials comprising metal carbide grains in a more ductile metallic binder. This microstructure results in a combination of high hardness and toughness, making them commonly used as rock crushing parts in rock drilling, where they usually show wear on a very fine scale. The hardness and toughness can ultimately be tuned for the application by adjusting the carbide grain size, binder fraction and composition.In the present investigation, the initial micro-scale deformation and wear of polished cemented carbide surfaces is studied by micro scratching with diamond and granite styli, and also by instrumented micro and nanoindentation. The deformation and wear is evaluated on the sub-micrometer scale using high resolution FEG-SEM and FIB cross sectioning. The selected microstructures include besides four cemented carbide grades that are commonly used in rock drilling also binderless and Ni containing grades. This wider range of cemented carbides is used to gain fundamental insights into the relations between microstructure and micro-scale deformation and wear. The results are discussed with respect to their significance for wear of cemented carbides in rock drilling operations.

  • 9. Heinrichs, Jannica
    et al.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Uppsala universitet.
    Almqvist, Bjarne
    Jacobson, Staffan
    Initial surface failure and wear of cemented carbides in sliding contact with different rock types2018In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 408-409, p. 43-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The initial wear, deformation and degradation of cemented carbide in contact with different rock types are studied using a crossed cylinder sliding test. The sliding distance is limited to centimetres at a time, interrupted by successive SEM analysis. This allows for careful studies of the gradually changing microstructure of the cemented carbide during the test. Five different rock types are included; granite, metal sulphide ore, mica schist, quartzite and marble. All rock types are very different in microstructure, composition and properties. The cemented carbide grade used for the evaluation contains 6 wt% Co and fine (~ 1 µm) WC grains, a grade commonly used in rock drilling. The results show that the cemented carbide microstructure becomes altered already during the very first contact with rock. The initial wear rate and wear character is highly influenced by the rock type. The initial wear of the cemented carbide is highest against quartzite and lowest against marble.

  • 10. Heinrichs, Jannica
    et al.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Jacobson, Staffan
    Mechanisms of material transfer studied in situ in the SEM: explanations to the success of DLC coated tools in aluminium forming2012In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 292, p. 49-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal forming constitutes a group of industrially important processes to form metallic components to net shape. When forming aluminium and other materials that tend to stick to the tools, problems occur. The transferred work material increases the friction, which increases the forming forces. Additionally, the transferred work material becomes hardened and then scratches the softer work material in subsequent forming. This process, known as galling, compromises the surface finish of the next pieces to be formed. This paper employs a newly developed technique to investigate the initial stages of transfer at high resolution in situ in the SEM. We show that the complex microscale processes involved can be distinguished into three classes: primary transfer, secondary transfer and damage activated transfer. The damage activated transfer constitutes a new fundamental tribological phenomenon, involving the activation and healing of a soft metal in sliding contact with a harder surface. Damage activation leads to transfer onto surfaces such as the polished DLC in this investigation, which would otherwise not see any transfer. These processes are important when forming aluminium, but are expected to be of general tribological significance, in sliding involving non-perfect lubricant films, especially for soft metals with protective surface oxides. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 11. Heinrichs, Jannica
    et al.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Jacobson, Staffan
    New understanding of the initiation of material transfer and transfer layer build-up in metal forming: in situ studies in the SEM2012In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 292, p. 61-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tribological mechanisms behind the initiation of material transfer and build-up of transfer layers in aluminium forming have been studied in situ in the SEM where a tip of aluminium is put into contact with a tool steel surface under controlled sliding contact conditions. By combining in situ observations with post-test high resolution FEG-SEM studies of the contacting surfaces we have shown that aluminium is immediately transferred onto the fine polished tool steel. It was also confirmed that the initial transfer occurs on a very fine scale and is localised to the surface irregularities presented by the slightly protruding carbonitrides. In contrast, the less protruding M6C carbides, as well as the martensitic steel matrix exhibit very little initial transfer. Intentionally made scratches (roughly 5 mu m wide and 2 mu m deep) across the tool surface immediately result in larger scale transfer, which grows upon further passages of work material causing a high coefficient of friction. The study illuminates the extreme value of combining the in situ technique with high-resolution scanning electron microscopy using low acceleration voltage as a mean to detect the very thin initial transfer layers. With the higher acceleration voltages normally used, the transferred aluminium becomes transparent and can hardly be detected. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Nilsson, Maria
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Tribomaterials group, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Microstructural, mechanical and tribological characterisation of roll materials for the finishing stands of the hot strip mill for steel rolling2013In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 307, no 1-2, p. 209-217Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The microstructure, mechanical and tribologicalproperties for three different materials, High Speed Steel, High Chromium ironand Indefinite Chill iron, used for hot strip mill work rolls have beenevaluated. Microstructural characterisation was performed using light opticalmicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-rayspectroscopy. The mechanical and tribological properties were evaluated usingmicro Vickers indentation and scratch testing in combination with post-testmicroscopy. The microstructures of the investigated materials were found to berather complex with a number of secondary phases andalso materials with similar nominal composition display significant differenceswith respect to distribution, size and morphology of carbides. Scratch testing,including detection of friction coefficient, acoustic emission and penetrationdepth, gives valuable information concerning the mechanical and tribologicalresponse on a microscopic level of the investigated materials. Type,amount, distribution, size and morphology of the secondary phases in thematerials have a strong impact on the surface deformation and wear mechanismsduring scratching. Cracking and chipping are frequently observed in connectionto the ridges surrounding the scratches. However, cross-sectional analyses ofthe scratched microstructures reveal that cracking of the brittle carbidephases may extend to significant depths, >100 µm, reducing the mechanicalstrength of the material. Based on the results, it is believed that a moreisotropic microstructure, e.g. obtained via a powder metallurgy process, withfiner carbides would result in improved properties and performance in a hotrolling application.

  • 13.
    Nilsson, Maria
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Tribological testing of some potential PVD and CVD coatings for steel wire drawing dies2011In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 273, no 1, p. 55-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possibility to replace cemented carbide wire drawing dies with CVD or PVD coated steel dies. Material pick-up tendency, friction and wear characteristics of four different commercial coatings – CVD TiC and PVD (Ti,Al)N, CrN and CrC/C – in sliding contact with ASTM 52100 bearing steel were evaluated using pin-on-disc testing. The load bearing capacity of the coating/substrate composites was evaluated using scratch testing. The results show that the friction characteristics and material pick-up tendency of the coatings to a large extent is controlled by the surface topography of the as-deposited coatings which should be improved by a polishing post-treatment in order to obtain a smooth surface. Based on the results obtained in this study, three different coatings – CrC/C, TiC and dual-layer TiC/CrC/C – are recommended to be evaluated in wire drawing field tests. CrC/C and TiC are recommended due to their intrinsic low friction properties and material pick-up tendency in sliding contact with steel. The dual-layer is recommended in order to combine the good properties of the two coatings CrC/C (low shear strength) and TiC (high hardness).

  • 14. Olofsson, J.
    et al.
    Bexell, Ulf
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Jacobson, S.
    Tribofilm formation of lightly loaded self mated alumina contacts2012In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 289, p. 39-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A tribofilm is formed on alumina surfaces that have been slid against alumina surfaces. The tribofilm is formed by alumina wear particles that have been ground, agglomerated and tribosintered to a film. The tribofilm smoothens out the surface topography and fills up cavities. Tribofilms on alumina surfaces have been investigated with respect to surface appearance, hardness and chemical composition. Surface preparation and surrounding humidity have shown to affect the character and lateral distribution of the tribofilm. The tribofilm that was formed in humid air was softer than the tribofilm formed in dry air. XPS analysis revealed the chemical shift of the Al 2p peak did not differ between the tribofilms that was formed in different humidity, nor the unworn reference surface, finding that no hydroxide was found on the alumina surfaces. Also, no tribochemical changes could be detected by ToF-SIMS analysis. (C) 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Olovsjö, S
    et al.
    Atlas Copco.
    Johanson, R
    Atlas Copco.
    Falsafi, M
    Atlas Copco.
    Bexell, Ulf
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Surface failure and wear of cemented carbide rock drill buttons: the importance of sample preparation and optimized microscopy settings2013In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 302, no 1-2, p. 1546-1554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The combination of suitable mechanical properties and wear resistance makes cemented carbide one of the most interesting engineering composite materials for tribological applications, such as in rock drilling. Despite the fact that cemented carbide buttons have been used in rock drilling applications for a long time the detailed understanding of the prevailing wear mechanisms is far from complete and wear and breakage of rock drill buttons are still one of the lifetime-limiting factors for rock drill bits. Consequently, further research in this area, including detailed characterization of worn drill button surfaces and sub-surface regions, is needed in order to support the future development of new cemented carbide grades with improved failure and wear resistance. In the present paper, high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) have been used to characterize the wear and failure mechanisms of worn drill buttons and samples exposed to well controlled impact and scratch tests performed in the laboratory. The most important mechanisms of surface failure and wear were found to be severe plastic deformation, cracking, crushing of individual WC grains and mechanical/tribochemical degradation of the Co binder phase including Co depletion. Fracture cross-sectioning under tensile stress-state was found to be the best method for achieving large and reliable sub-surface cross-sections within a short time and to a low cost. The importance of optimized microscopy and spectroscopy settings for enhanced surface sensitivity for the examination of small-scale tribological phenomena is illuminated and discussed.

  • 16.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    A new test method for measuring the galling resistance between metal powders and die tool materials in powder compaction2011In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 273, no 1, p. 49-54Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The friction characteristics and galling resistance between metal powder and die tool material in metal powder compaction is of outmost importance since they will influence the porosity and surface quality of the green body and consequently the porosity, tolerances and surface quality of the final sintered product. In the present study, a new test method for evaluating the tribological performance of die tool materials aimed for powder compaction is presented. The test method is based on controlled scratch testing using a commercial scratch tester but instead of the commonly used Rockwell C diamond stylus a sample holder with a small green body of compacted powder particles is drawn over the surface in a well controlled multi pass linear reciprocating sliding contact. The capability of the test method was evaluated for different types of tool materials including two PVD coatings in contact with different types of metal powders to determine the friction characteristics and the adhesion and material transfer tendency at the sliding interface. Post-test examination of the tool surfaces using FEG-SEM and EDS were performed in order to evaluate the mechanisms controlling the friction behavior and the material transfer tendency. The results show that the proposed test is a simple and fast method to obtain relevant data regarding the friction and galling characteristics of die tool materials in metal powder compaction. The mechanisms prevailing at the green body/die tool material interface, e.g. cold welding, can easily be monitored by the friction and acoustic emission signals. Of the die tool materials investigated the low friction PVD a-C:Cr coating displayed the lowest friction and highest galling resistance.

  • 17.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Tribological evaluation of some potential tribo materials used in column lift rolling contacts: a case study2011In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 270, no 9-10, p. 720-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The friction and wear characteristics of some potential tribological pairs aimed for the wheel/rail rolling contact in column lifts were studied. Tribo tests were performed using a pin-on-disc equipment and the tribological pairs included; stainless steel against ball bearing steel, stainless steel against WC/C-coated ball bearing steel and stainless steel against cast nylon (polyamide 6). The influence of coating surface topography as well as stainless steel surface topography on the friction and wear behaviour of the tribological pairs was investigated. The results show that the WC/C-coating significantly improves the tribological performance of the stainless steel/ball bearing steel sliding couples but that the WC/C-coating show a limited life-time in sliding contact with stainless steel under the prevailing contact conditions. In contrast, the stainless steel/ball bearing steel sliding couples suffer from high friction and wear due to strong adhesion between the mating surfaces followed by metal transfer and severe adhesive wear. The stainless steel/cast nylon sliding couples show a somewhat intermediate behaviour regarding friction and wear where the friction is controlled by the generation of a polymer transfer film and wear of the cast nylon is controlled by the surface topography of the mating stainless steel surface. The results obtained are discussed in relation to the identified friction and wear mechanisms as characterized by SEM and EDX.

  • 18.
    Olsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Bexell, Ulf
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Friction characteristics and material transfer tendency in metal powder compaction2011In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 271, no 9-10, p. 1903-1908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The friction characteristics and material transfer tendency between metal powder and die tool material in metal powder compaction play an important role in the production of near-net-shape components of high density. A natural step to further increase the green density and simplify the sintering process is to reduce the amount of internal lubricant in the powder since the volume fraction of an organic lubricant will result in a significant contribution to the resulting porosity. However, this will significantly increase the adhesive contact and thus the friction between the die and the powder/green body during the powder compaction process. As a result, the compaction and ejection forces as well as the wear rate of the die and punch surfaces will increase. Consequently, improved knowledge concerning the friction mechanisms prevailing at the metal powder/die tool material interface is needed. The present paper will present data regarding the influence of type of tool and coating material on the friction characteristics and material transfer tendency during simulated powder compaction of a water atomized plain iron powder under no or starved lubrication conditions using two different laboratory tribo tests. Tool materials investigated include ingot cast tool steel, powder metallurgy (PM) tool steel and TiAlN and DLC-type PVD coatings. Post-test characterization using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to analyse the tribo surfaces and especially the tendency to material transfer and tribo film formation. The results show that the material transfer tendency is mainly controlled by strong adhesive metal–metal contacts and that a PVD coating showing intrinsic low-friction properties and a smooth surface topography may significantly reduce the interaction between the mating surfaces promoting a stable friction and a low material transfer tendency.

  • 19.
    Olsson, Mikael
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Ångström Tribomaterials Group, Uppsala University.
    Yvell, Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Heinrichs, J.
    Bengtsson, M.
    Jacobson, S.
    Surface degradation mechanisms of cemented carbide drill buttons in iron ore rock drilling2017In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 388-389, p. 81-92Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The wear behavior of cemented carbide rock drill buttons is influenced by many factors, which include the composition and microstructure of the cemented carbide material, the nature of the rock material, and the conditions of the rock drilling operation. Depending on the type of rock and on the drilling procedure used, the cemented carbide is exposed to substantially differing mechanical and thermal conditions. In the present study, the surface degradation and wear mechanisms of cemented carbide drill buttons exposed to iron ore rock drilling have been characterized based on a combination of high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focused ion beam cross-sectioning (FIB), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron back scatter diffraction (EBSD).The results show a significant difference in surface degradation and wear between the front and peripheral buttons of the drill bits. While the front buttons display a relatively smooth worn surface with shallow surface craters the peripheral buttons display a reptile skin pattern, i.e. plateaus, 200-300. μm in diameter, separated by valleys, typically 40-50. μm wide and 15-30. μm deep, The reptile skin pattern is obtained in regions where the peripheral buttons are in sliding contact against the drill hole walls and exposed to high surface temperatures caused by the frictional heating. The results indicate that the reptile skin pattern is related to friction induced thermal stresses rather than mechanical contact stresses, i.e. the reptile skin pattern is formed due to thermal fatigue, rather than mechanical fatigue, caused by the cyclic frictional heating generated at the cemented carbide button/iron ore interface.

  • 20. Rendon, José
    et al.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Material Science.
    Abrasive wear resistance of some commercial abrasion resistant steels evaluated by laboratory test methods2009In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 267, no 11, p. 2055-2061Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study is to evaluate the abrasive wear resistance of some potential abrasion resistant steels exposed to different types of abrasive wear contact conditions typical of mining and transportation applications. The steels investigated, include a ferritic stainless steel, a medium alloyed ferritic carbon steel and a medium alloyed martensitic carbon steel. The abrasive wear resistance of the steels was evaluated using two different laboratory test methods, i.e. pin-on-disc testing and paddle wear testing that expose the materials to sliding abrasion and impact abrasion, respectively. All tests were performed under dry conditions in air at room temperature. In order to evaluate the tribological response of the different steels post-test characterization of the worn surfaces were performed using optical surface profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Besides, characterization of the wear induced sub-surface microstructure was performed using optical microscopy. The results show that depending on the abrasive conditions a combination of high hardness and toughness (fracture strain) is of importance in order to obtain a high wear resistance. In the pin-on-disc test (i.e. in sliding abrasion) these properties seem to be controlled by the as-rolled microstructure of the steels although a thin triboinduced sub-surface layer (5-10 mu m in thickness) may influence the results. In contrast, in the paddle wear test (i.e. in impact abrasion), resulting in higher forces acting perpendicular to the surface by impacting stones, these properties are definitely controlled by the properties of the active sub-surface layer which also contains small imbedded stone fragments.

  • 21.
    Safara Nosar, Nima
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Influence of tool steel surface topography on adhesion and material transfer in stainless steel/tool steel sliding contact2013In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 303, no 1-2, p. 30-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transfer of work material to the tool surface is a common problem in many metal forming and metal working operations, especially in the case of work materials with a high adhesion tendency e.g. stainless steel, aluminum and titanium. In many operations, material transfer occurs already during the initial contact and with time it may result in degradation and roughening of the tool surface which will affect the surface quality of the formed or machined work material surface, e.g. problems related to galling in sheet metal forming. In the present study, the mechanisms behind the initial stages of material transfer between stainless steel and tool steel have been investigated under well controlled laboratory conditions and analyzed using optical surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy.The results show that, independent of tool surface topography, transfer of stainless steel occurs already after a very short sliding distance. Depending on the tool steel surface topography, initial transfer occurs on two different scales. For a fine polished tool steel surface, fine scale transfer occurs in connection to protruding hard phase particles (carbides and carbonitrides) while for a ground rough surface large scale transfer occurs in connection to grinding scratches, where these act to mechanically scrape off material resulting in lumps off stainless steel on the tool steel surface. Also, sliding perpendicular to the grinding scratches results in more severe material transfer as compared with sliding parallel to the grinding scratches. Finally, the present paper illuminates the usefulness of combining optical surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy as a powerful analytical tool when it comes to understanding the mechanisms controlling material transfer in a sliding contact on a Όm-scale level. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  • 22.
    Saketi, Sara
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Bexell, Ulf
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Östy, Jonas
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    On the Diffusion Wear of Cemented Carbide in the Turning of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel2019In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study focuses on the wear and wear mechanisms of three different cemented carbide grades during orthogonal turning of 316L austenitic stainless steel at different cutting speeds. The influence of WC grain size and cutting speed on the resulting crater and flank wear was evaluated by optical surface profilometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The mechanisms behind the crater and flank wear were characterized on the sub-micrometer scale using high resolution SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) of the worn cutting inserts and the produced chips.

    The results show that the wear rate of cemented carbide drastically increases with increasing cutting speed and that the wear is dependent on the WC grain size; i.e. the crater wear decreases with increasing WC grain size while the flank wear increases with increasing WC grain size. High resolution SEM, AES and ToF-SIMS analysis of the worn cemented carbide within the crater and flank wear regions reveal that the degradation of cemented carbide at higher cutting speeds is mainly controlled by diffusion wear of the WC-phase. This is confirmed by ToF-SIMS analysis of the back-side of stainless steel chips which reveals the presence of a 10 nm thin W-containing oxide film. The results are discussed and interpreted in the light of the conditions prevailing at the tool-chip interface.

  • 23.
    Saketi, Sara
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Odelros, Stina
    Östby, Jonas
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Wear and wear mechanisms of cemented carbide in the turning of Ti6Al4V2019In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Titanium and titanium alloys such as Ti-6Al-4V are generally considered as difficult-to-machine materials. This is mainly due to their high chemical reactivity, poor thermal conductivity and high strength, which is maintained at elevated temperatures. As a result, the cutting tool is exposed to rather extreme contact conditions resulting in plastic deformation and wear. In the present work, the mechanisms behind the crater and flank wear of uncoated cemented carbide inserts in the turning of Ti6Al4V are characterized using high resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and high resolution Auger electron spectroscopy (AES).

    The results show that for combinations of low cutting speeds / feeds crater and flank wear were found to be controlled by an attrition wear mechanism while for combinations of medium to high cutting speeds / feeds a diffusion wear mechanism was found to control the wear. For the latter combinations, high resolution SEM and AES analysis reveal the formation of an approximately 100 nm thick carbon depleted WC-layer at the cemented carbide/Ti6Al4V interface due to the diffusion of carbon into the adhered build-up layers of work material on the rake and flank surfaces.

  • 24.
    Saketi, Sara
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Ångström Tribomaterials group, Uppsala University.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Ångström Tribomaterials group, Uppsala University.
    Influence of CVD and PVD coating micro topography on the initial material transfer of 316L stainless steel in sliding contacts: A laboratory study2017In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 388-389, p. 29-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Austenitic stainless steels generally display poor tribological properties in sliding contacts partly due to their strong adhesion and transfer tendency to the counter surface. As a result machining of austenitic stainless steels is frequently associated with significant problems such as high stresses and high temperatures resulting in rapid tool wear. In the present study, the influence of coating micro topography on the initial material transfer of 316L stainless steel in sliding contacts has been evaluated using a scratch testing equipment. Coating materials include modern CVD Ti(C,N)-Al2O3-TiN and PVD (Ti,Al)N-(Al,Cr2)O3 coatings deposited on cemented carbide and pre- and post-coating grinding and polishing treatments were used to obtain different micro topographies of the coating surface. Pre- and post-test characterization of the surfaces was performed using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and optical surface profilometry.

    The results show that the intrinsic topography of the as-deposited CVD and PVD coatings promotes material transfer. For the as-deposited CVD coating the nanoscale topography of the crystals controls the transfer while for the PVD coating the µm-scale droplets and craters control the transfer. Post-polishing of the coating, especially in combination with pre-polishing of the substrate, significantly improves the tribological performance of the surface reducing the friction coefficient and the material transfer tendency. However, the presence of µm sized droplets and craters in the PVD coating limit the possibility to obtain a smooth post-polished surface and its resistance to material pick-up. In contrast, post-polishing of the CVD coating does not suffer from intrinsic coating defects which results in low friction and a very high resistance to material pick-up.

  • 25.
    Saketi, Sara
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Uppsala Universitet.
    Sveen, Susanne
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Linköpings Universitet.
    Gunnarsson, S
    Uddeholm Tooling.
    M’Sauobi, R
    Seco Tools.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Wear of a high cBN content PCBN cutting tool during hard milling of powder metallurgy cold work tool steels2015In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 332, p. 752-761Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The wear characteristics of a high cBN content PCBN cutting tool during hard milling of two different hardened cold work tool steels have been evaluated. Post-cutting examination of the worn cutting inserts was performed using high resolution field emission gun scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy and optical surface profilometry. Also, the machined work material surfaces and collected chips were characterized in order to evaluate the prevailing wear mechanisms. The results show that both flank and crater wear are controlled by continuous wear due to tribochemical reactions, adhesive wear and mild abrasive wear. Besides, the cutting inserts show a tendency to micro-chipping along the cutting edge especially at higher cutting speed. The latter mechanism was also found to be dependent on type of work material. High lateral resolution Auger electron spectroscopy of the crater region shows that the worn surface is covered by a thin SixOy rich tribofilm with a thickness of 50-500 nm, the tribofilm being thicker on the binder phase regions. Also, the Co-rich regions of the binder phase seem to be more tribochemically affected by the prevailing contact conditions as compared with the W-rich regions of the binder phase and the cBN phase. 

  • 26.
    Saketi, Sara
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Ångström Tribomaterials Group, Uppsala University.
    Östby, J.
    AB Sandvik Coromant, Sandviken.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Ångström Tribomaterials Group, Uppsala University.
    Influence of tool surface topography on the material transfer tendency and tool wear in the turning of 316L stainless steel2016In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 368–369, p. 239-252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract The influence of tool surface topography on the initiation and build-up of transfer layers in the orthogonal turning of 316L austenitic stainless steel have been studied under well controlled conditions. Tool materials include CVD Ti(C,N)-Al2O3-TiN and PVD (Ti, Al)N-(Al,Cr)2O3 coated cemented carbide inserts prepared using different grinding and polishing treatments. Post-test characterization of the inserts was performed using high resolution scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The results show that the transfer tendency of work material is strongly affected by the surface topography of the rake face. For both types of inserts, the initial transfer and the build-up of transfer layers are localised to microscopic surface irregularities on the rake face. Consequently, an appropriate surface treatment of the cemented carbide substrate before coating deposition and the as-deposited CVD and PVD coating can be used in order to reduce the transfer tendency and the mechanical interaction between the mating surfaces. Also, an improved surface finish was found to reduce coating wear and consequently the crater wear rate of the inserts investigated. This can most likely be explained by the reduced tendency to discrete chipping of coating fragments in the contact zone and the formation of a thin transfer layer composed of Al, Si, Ca, O with beneficial friction properties which are promoted by a smooth coating surface.

  • 27.
    Saketi, Sara
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Östby, Jonas
    Bexell, Ulf
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    A Methodology to Systematically Investigate the Diffusion Degradation of Cemented Carbide during Machining2019In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using Ti6Al4V as a work material, a methodology to systematically investigate the diffusion degradation of cemented carbide during machining is proposed. The methodology includes surface characterization of as-tested worn inserts, wet etched inserts, metallographic cross-sectioned as-tested worn inserts as well as the back-side of the produced chips. Characterization techniques used include SEM, AES and ToF-SIMS.

    The results show that the characterization of wet etched worn inserts give quick and useful information regarding the diffusion degradation of cemented carbide, in the present study the formation of a fine crystalline W layer (carbon depleted WC layer) at the tool / work material interface. The present work also illuminates the potential of AES analysis when it comes to analyzing the degradation of cemented carbide in contact with the work material (in the present study Ti6Al4V) during machining. The high surface sensitivity in combination with high lateral resolution makes it possible to analyze the worn cemented carbide surface on a sub-µm level. Especially AES sputter depth profiling, resulting in detailed information of variations in chemical composition across interfaces, is a powerful tool when it comes to understanding diffusion wear. Finally, the present work illustrates the importance of analyzing not only the worn tool but also the produced chips. An accurate characterization of the back-side of the chips will give important information regarding the wear mechanisms taking place at the tool rake face / chip interface. Surface analysis techniques such as AES and ToF-SIMS are well suited for this type of surface characterization.

  • 28.
    Schultheiss, F
    et al.
    Lunds Universitet.
    Fallqvist, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    M’Sauobi, R
    Seco Tools.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Ståhl, J E
    Lunds Universitet.
    Influence of CVD Al2O3 coated tool surface micro topography on the tribological characteristics in metal cutting: part II2013In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 298, p. 23-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The tribological conditions at the contact between the cutting tool and the chip are of great importance when analyzing the machining process. By knowing the contact conditions on the rake face of the cutting tool the wear on the clearance and rake face may be predicted in terms of size and type of wear. A certain value of the surface stresses is often thought of as leading to a higher wear rate of the cutting tool and thus a shorter tool life. In this article two different methods for experimentally measuring the contact condition on the clearance and rake face of the cutting tool are presented and illustrated with results obtained while turning AISI 4140. Results are also obtained in terms of how the surface roughness value of the cutting tool influences the contact condition. It was found that the tool surface topography may have a significant impact on the tribological performance during machining.

  • 29.
    Sveen, Susanne
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology. Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, J
    Seco Tools.
    M’Sauobi, R
    Seco Tools.
    Olsson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Materials Technology.
    Scratch adhesion characteristics of PVD TiAlN deposited on high speed steel, cemented carbide and PCBN substrates2013In: Wear, ISSN 0043-1648, E-ISSN 1873-2577, Vol. 308, no 1-2, p. 133-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Modern tool materials, ranging from powder metallurgical high speed steel to super hard materials such as polycrystalline cubic boron nitride and diamond, are used as cutting tools in the metal cutting industry. In order to further improve the cutting performance, these tools are frequently coated by thin, hard PVD coatings such as TiN, TiAlN, AlCrO3, etc. In order to develop and design new PVD coatings it is important to characterize the mechanical properties of the coatings and understand the coating/substrate deformation mechanisms in a tribological contact, e.g. metal cutting. For example, it is important to be aware that the mechanical properties of the substrate (tool material) have a significant impact on the practical coating adhesion and the coating failure mechanisms.

    In the present study scratch testing has been used in order to evaluate to increase the understanding of the mechanical response and potential coating failure modes of cathodic arc evaporated TiAlN deposited on high speed steel, cemented carbide and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride. Post-test characterization of the scratched samples using optical profilometry, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were performed and the cohesive and adhesive surface failure mechanisms are described and related to the substrate material properties. The results clearly show that, although all substrate materials can be regarded as hard, they result in completely different coating failure mechanisms at the normal load corresponding to substrate exposure. Also, coating failure resulting in substrate exposure does not necessarily correspond to interfacial cracking resulting in adhesive fracture along the coating-substrate interface.

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