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  • 1. Locke, Adam E
    et al.
    Kahali, Bratati
    Berndt, Sonja I
    Justice, Anne E
    Pers, Tune H
    Day, Felix R
    Powell, Corey
    Vedantam, Sailaja
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Speliotes, Elizabeth K
    Genetic studies of body mass index yield new insights for obesity biology2015In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 515, no 7538, p. 197-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Obesity is heritable and predisposes to many diseases. To understand the genetic basis of obesity better, here we conduct a genome-wide association study and Metabochip meta-analysis of body mass index (BMI), a measure commonly used to define obesity and assess adiposity, in upto 339,224 individuals. This analysis identifies 97 BMI-associated loci (P < 5 x 10(-8)), 56 of which are novel. Five loci demonstrate clear evidence of several independent association signals, and many loci have significant effects on other metabolic phenotypes. The 97 loci account for similar to 2.7% of BMI variation, and genome-wide estimates suggest that common variation accounts for >20% of BMI variation. Pathway analyses provide strong support for a role of the central nervous systemin obesity susceptibility and implicate new genes and pathways, including those related to synaptic function, glutamate signalling, insulin secretion/action, energy metabolism, lipid biology and adipogenesis.

  • 2. Shungin, Dmitry
    et al.
    Winkler, Thomas W
    Croteau-Chonka, Damien C
    Ferreira, Teresa
    Locke, Adam E
    Mägi, Reedik
    Strawbridge, Rona J
    Pers, Tune H
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppasla universitet.
    Mohlke, Karen L
    New genetic loci link adipose and insulin biology to body fat distribution2015In: Nature, ISSN 0028-0836, E-ISSN 1476-4687, Vol. 518, no 7538, p. 187-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Body fat distribution is a heritable trait and a well-established predictor of adverse metabolic outcomes, independent of overall adiposity. To increase our understanding of the genetic basis of body fat distribution and its molecular links to cardiometabolic traits, here we conduct genome-wide association meta-analyses of traits related to waist and hip circumferences in up to 224,459 individuals. We identify 49 loci (33 new) associated with waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for body mass index (BMI), and an additional 19 loci newly associated with related waist and hip circumference measures (P < 5 x 10(-8)). In total, 20 of the 49 waist-to-hip ratio adjusted for BMI loci show significant sexual dimorphism, 19 of which display a stronger effect in women. The identified loci were enriched for genes expressed in adipose tissue and for putative regulatory elements in adipocytes. Pathway analyses implicated adipogenesis, angiogenesis, transcriptional regulation and insulin resistance as processes affecting fat distribution, providing insight into potential pathophysiological mechanisms.

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CiteExportLink to result list
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
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  • en-US
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