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  • 1.
    Arkkukangas, Marina
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Johnson, S. T.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hellström, K.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Söderlund, Anne
    Mälardalens högskola, Hälsa och välfärd.
    Eriksson, S.
    Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Sweden.
    Johansson, Ann-Christin
    Mälardalens högskola, Hälsa och välfärd.
    A feasibility study of a randomised controlled trial comparing fall prevention using exercise with or without the support of motivational interviewing2015In: Preventive Medicine Reports, E-ISSN 2211-3355, Vol. 2, p. 134-140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this investigation was to study the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) based on a multicentre fall prevention intervention including exercise with or without motivational interviewing compared to standard care in community-living people 75. years and older. Method: The feasibility of a three-armed, randomised controlled trial was evaluated according to the following: process, resources, management by questionnaire, and treatment outcomes. The outcome measures were fall frequency, physical performance and falls self-efficacy evaluated after three months. Twelve physiotherapists conducted the measurements and treatments and responded to the questionnaire. The first 45 participants recruited to the ongoing RCT were included: 16 individuals in the Otago Exercise Program group (OEP), 16 individuals in the OEP combined with motivational interviewing group (MI), and 13 individuals in the control group. The study was conducted from November 2012 to December 2013. Results: The feasibility of the study process, resources and management reached the set goals in most aspects; however, the set goal regarding the MI guide and planned exercise for the participating older people was not completely reached. No significant differences were found between the groups regarding the outcome measures. Conclusion: This study confirmed the acceptable feasibility for the study protocol in the ongoing RCT.

  • 2. Arkkukangas, Marina
    et al.
    Strömqvist Bååthe, Karin
    Ekholm, Anna
    Tonkonogi, Michail
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Health promotion and prevention: The impact of specifically adapted judo-inspired training program on risk factors for falls among adults.2020In: Preventive Medicine Reports, E-ISSN 2211-3355, Vol. 19, article id 101126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Globally, falls and fall-related injuries constitute a severe threat to public health at all ages. New approaches are warranted since existing knowledge and actions have failed to reduce the incidence of falls and fall-related injuries, both at work and during leisure time. The purpose of this quasi-experimental study was to investigate the impact of a 10-week supervised judo-inspired exercise program, Judo4Balance, provided in a workplace setting among men and women targeting: physical functions, activity level, fall-related self-efficacy, and techniques for safe landing when falling. A total of 79 adults from seven different workplaces in Sweden, mean age 45 years (18-68), participated in the program. The study was conducted from May 2018 to June 2019. The 10-week exercise program performed in a workplace setting improved physical and psychological functions, as well as techniques for falling safely, factors of great importance to prevent falls and fall-related injuries among men and women. Therefore, it is suggested that the judo-inspired exercise program may be an effective tool in the quest to promote health and prevention of risk factors for falls and fall-related injuries among those of working age.

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  • 3. Krachler, B
    et al.
    Jerdén, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science. Center for Clinical Research Dalarna-Uppsala University, Falun.
    Tönnesen, H
    Lindén, C
    Medical licensing examinations in both Sweden and the US favor pharmacology over lifestyle.2021In: Preventive Medicine Reports, E-ISSN 2211-3355, Vol. 23, article id 101453Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low priority of disease prevention and health promotion in medical education may contribute to lack of lifestyle-counseling in clinical practice. Pharmacology-related knowledge is valued 5 times higher compared to lifestyle-related knowledge in examinations on noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) in undergraduate medical education in Sweden. This study aims to establish (i) whether medical licensing examinations are biased to favor pharmacology- over lifestyle-related knowledge and (ii) whether such a bias is present in both Sweden and the US. We identified 204 NCD-related questions from previous Swedish licensing examinations, and 77 cases from a U.S. question bank commonly used to prepare for the United States Medical Licensing Examination® (USMLE®) Step 3. With the help of expected correct answers, we determined distribution of points attainable for knowledge in the respective category (lifestyle / pharmacology / other) for 5 major NCDs: coronary heart disease (CHD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, hypertension, and stroke. The percentage of points attainable for lifestyle-related knowledge was 6.7 (95% CI 4.1-9.3) in Sweden and 4.6 (95%CI 0.0-9.1) in the U.S. The respective percentages for pharmacology-related knowledge were 32.6 (95% CI 26.3-38.8) and 44.5 (95% CI 33.2-55.8) percent. The pharmacology vs. lifestyle-quotas were 4.9 in Sweden and 9.8 in the U.S. Likelihoods of equal emphasis on lifestyle and pharmacology in NCDs was < 0.001 in both countries. There is a marked preference for pharmacology over lifestyle in medical licensing examinations in both Sweden and the U.S. Newly qualified doctors may be inadequately prepared to address preventable causes of NCDs.

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