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  • 1. Cedervall, Y.
    et al.
    Stenberg, A. M.
    Åhman, H.B.
    Giedraitis, V.
    Tinmark, F.
    Berglund, L.
    Halvorsen, K.
    Ingelsson, M.
    Rosendahl, E.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Timed up-and-go dual-task testing in the assessment of cognitive function: A mixed methods observational study for development of the UDDGait protocol2020In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 17, no 5, article id 1715Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Kylén, Maya
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Von Koch, Lena
    Pessah-Rasmussen, Hélène
    Marcheschi, Elizabeth
    Ytterberg, Charlotte
    Heylighen, Ann
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Chalmers University.
    The importance of the built environment in person-centred rehabilitation at home: study protocol2019In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 16, no 13, article id E2409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Health services will change dramatically as the prevalence of home healthcare increases. Only technologically advanced acute care will be performed in hospitals. This-along with the increased healthcare needs of people with long-term conditions such as stroke and the rising demand for services to be more person-centred-will place pressure on healthcare to consider quality across the continuum of care. Research indicates that planned discharge tailored to individual needs can reduce adverse events and promote competence in self-management. However, the environmental factors that may play a role in a patient's recovery process remain unexplored. This paper presents a protocol with the purpose to explore factors in the built environment that can facilitate/hinder a person-centred rehabilitation process in the home. The project uses a convergent parallel mixed-methods design, with ICF (International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health) and person-environment theories as conceptual frameworks. Data will be collected during home visits 3 months after stroke onset. Medical records, questionnaires, interviews and observations will be used. Workshops will be held to identify what experts and users (patients, significant others, staff) consider important in the built environment. Data will be used to synthesise the contexts, mechanisms and outcomes that are important to support the rehabilitation process at home.

  • 3.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Uppsala University.
    From, Ingrid
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Bergman Bruhn, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Oestreicher, Lars
    Uppsala University.
    Melander-Wikman, Anita
    Luleå University of Technology.
    A study protocol for applying user participation and co-learning: lessons learned from the eBalance project2017In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, no 5, article id 512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eBalance project is based on the idea that serious exergames—i.e., computer gaming systems with an interface that requires physical exertion to play—that are well adapted to users, can become a substantial part of a solution to recognized problems of insufficient engagement in fall-prevention exercise and the high levels of fall-related injuries among older people. This project is carried out as a collaboration between eight older people who have an interest in balance training and met the inclusion criteria of independence in personal activities of daily living, access to and basic knowledge of a computer, four staff working with the rehabilitation of older adults, and an interdisciplinary group of six research coordinators covering the areas of geriatric care and rehabilitation, as well as information technology and computer science. This paper describes the study protocol of the project’s initial phase which aims to develop a working partnership with potential users of fall-prevention exergames, including its conceptual underpinnings. The qualitative methodology was inspired by an ethnographical approach implying combining methods that allowed the design to evolve through the study based on the participants’ reflections. A participatory and appreciative action and reflection (PAAR) approach, accompanied by inquiries inspired by the Normalization Process Theory (NPT) was used in interactive workshops, including exergame testing, and between workshop activities. Data were collected through audio recordings, photos, and different types of written documentation. The findings provide a description of the methodology thus developed and applied. They display a methodology that can be useful for the design and development of care service and innovations for older persons where user participation is in focus.

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