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  • 1. Ayala, Ana
    et al.
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Velandia, Marianne
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska Institutet.
    Fathers’ care of the newborn infant after caesarean section in Chile: a qualitative study2016In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 8, p. 75-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Chilean hospitals the current model of care after caesarean section is to separate newborn infants from both parents. The care of newborn infants and the parents' experience immediately after caesarean section requires further exploration.

    Aim: To describe fathers' experiences and perceptions of being the primary caregiver to their newborn infant during the first 90 minutes after caesarean section in a public general maternity hospital setting in Santiago de Chile.

    Method: The questionnaire was one part of a larger research programme named: “Caregiving Models after Elective Caesarean Section – Parents' perceptions and effects on infants' wellbeing”. Four open ended questions were used to gather written text on the experiences and perceptions of 95 fathers who were the primary caregiver to their newborn infant. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee, Scientific Assessment Metropolitan Health Service South East. Systematic text condensation according to Malterud's description was used for analysis of the written text.

    Findings: Two themes were identified: “understanding the first moment of life” and “shared responsibility for future family life” with each theme divided into six categories.

    Conclusion: This study concludes by arguing that in situations where the mother is unavailable or unable to provide basic care, the father should be supported to care for the newborn infant.

    Clinical implications: Parents should be made aware of the benefits of this caring model especially when mother and baby have been separated after birth.

  • 2.
    Bogren, Malin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Opportunities, challenges and strategies when building a midwifery profession. Findings from a qualitative study in Bangladesh and Nepal2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 16, p. 45-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this paper was to identify opportunities and challenges when building a midwifery profession in Bangladesh and Nepal.

    Methods

    Data were collected through 33 semi-structured interviews with government officials, policy-makers, donors, and individuals from academia and non-government organizations with an influence in building a midwifery profession in their respective countries. Data were analyzed using content analysis.

    Findings

    The opportunities and challenges found in Bangladesh and Nepal when building a midwifery profession emerged the theme “A comprehensive collaborative approach, with a political desire, can build a midwifery profession while competing views, interest, priorities and unawareness hamper the process”. Several factors were found to facilitate the establishment of a midwifery profession in both countries. For example, global and national standards brought together midwifery professionals and stakeholders, and helped in the establishment of midwifery associations. The challenges for both countries were national commitments without a full set of supporting policy documents, lack of professional recognition, and competing views, interests and priorities.

    Conclusion and clinical application

    This study demonstrated that building a midwifery profession requires a political comprehensive collaborative approach supported by a political commitment. Through bringing professionals together in a professional association will bring a professional status. Global standards and guidelines need to be contextualized into national policies and plans where midwives are included as part of the national health workforce. This is a key for creating recognized midwives with a protected title to autonomously practice midwifery, to upholding the sexual and reproductive health and rights for women and girls.

  • 3.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Hussein, I. H.
    Yusuf, F. M.
    Egal, J. A.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    The situation for female survivors of non-partner sexual violence: A focused enquiry of Somali young women's views, knowledge and opinions2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 16, p. 39-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of the study is to elucidate young women’s perceptions of the situation for female survivors of non-partner sexual violence in Somaliland.

    Methods

    Young Somali women with diverse backgrounds (n = 25) shared views, knowledge and opinions about non partner sexual violence in focus group discussions held in urban settings. Data was analysed using content analysis.

    Results

    A main category “Bound by culture and community perceptions” with four subcategories comprises the informants’ perceptions of non-partner sexual violence among young women in Somaliland. Illuminated is the importance of protecting oneself and the family dignity, a fear of being rejected and mistrusted, how the juridical system exists in the shadow of tradition and potential keys to healthcare support.

    Conclusion

    The study raises awareness of the dilemmas which may be faced by young women subjected to non-partner sexual violence and healthcare providers in the intersection between state and traditional norms. Education is a key when it comes to a young woman considering the use of the services available in a society where traditional problem-solving is relied on parallel to state-based support. State-based functions, communities and families need to work together to provide comprehensive support to young female survivors of non-partner sexual violence in Somaliland.

  • 4. Egeh, Abdi-Aziz
    et al.
    Dugsieh, Osman
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    The views of Somali religious leaders on birth spacing: A qualitative study2019In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 20, p. 27-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Birth spacing is an important health intervention for women to attain good physical and mental health. In Somalia, religious leaders play a decisive role in approving or rejecting the use of family planning.

    Objective

    The study aimed to investigate Somali Islamic religious leaders’ views on birth spacing.

    Method

    Qualitative individual interviews were conducted with 17 Somali Islamic religious leaders aged 28–59 years and analysed through content analysis.

    Results

    The main category that emerged from the analysis was that the concept “birth spacing should be used and nor family planning to be in accordance with the Islamic religion. Two perspectives of views of birth spacing were identified: accepted ways and unaccepted ways. The accepted ways include breastfeeding, use of contraceptives causing no harm to the women’s health, and coitus interruptus. The preferred method should be determined by a joint agreement between the husband and wife, and that Muslim doctors should play a key role while the couples investigate their preferred method. Using contraceptives with the intention to limit the number of children was against Islamic values and practice. In addition, it was believed that using condoms promoted the temptation to engage in sex outside the marriage and was therefore prohibited.

    Conclusion

    According to the religious Islamic leaders, selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use is permitted in relation to birth spacing to promote the health of the mother and child. When providing professional contraceptive counselling to Muslim women, the word “birth spacing” is recommended to be used instead of “family planning”.

  • 5.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Lustig, Helena
    Lindgren, Helena
    Women's experience of unplanned out-of-hospital birth in Sweden: a phenomenological description2015In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 6, no 4, p. 226-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Between 0.5 and 2 percent of women planning to give birth in a hospital environment in Sweden will have an unplanned out-of-hospital birth. Few studies have described mothers' experiences of out-of-hospital births and none on a Swedish population. In an attempt to fill this gap, we have made this pilot study designed to capture mothers' experiences of unplanned out-of-hospital births in Sweden.

    Method: Qualitative interviews with eight Swedish women, one to three years after they experienced an unplanned out-of-hospital birth. Data were analysed using the method of phenomenological description.

    Results: The meaning of giving unplanned birth outside a hospital environment was “The lived experience of a pendular movement between the good fortune and pride in managing the situation and the fear of what could have happened when giving unplanned birth outside a hospital environment.” In the analysis two clusters emerged that supported the essence: Balancing Emotions and Handling Unfamiliar Actions.

    Conclusions: This study contributes to an understanding of the natural processes when giving birth. The findings can be useful when communicating the experience of unplanned out-of-hospital birth to parents in antenatal classes. The women could be encouraged to listen and trust their own body signs as a preparation for giving birth in any type of setting. Guidelines for taking care of women with out-of-hospital birth experiences are suggested.

  • 6. Finlayson, Kenneth
    et al.
    Dixon, Annie
    Smith, Chris
    Dykes, Fiona
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK.
    Mothers’ perceptions of family centred care in neonatal intensive care units2014In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 119-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore mothers' perceptions of family centred care (FCC) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in England. 

    Design: The qualitative experiences of 12 mothers from three NICUs in the UK were elicited using individual interviews. A thematic network analysis was conducted on the transcribed interviews. 

    Main outcome measures: A central global theme supported by a number of organizing themes were developed reflecting the views of the mothers and their experiences of FCC. 

    Results: A global theme of "Finding My Place" was identified, supported by six organizing themes: Mothering in Limbo; Deference to the Experts; Anxious Surveillance; Muted Relations, Power Struggles and Consistently Inconsistent. Mothers experienced a state of liminality and were acutely sensitive to power struggles, awkward relationships and inconsistencies in care. To try to maintain their equilibrium and protect their baby they formed deferential relationships with health professionals and remained in a state of anxious surveillance. 

    Conclusions: This study illustrates that despite the rhetoric around the practice of FCC in NICUs, there was little in the mother's narratives to support this. It is of the utmost importance to minimize the consequences of the liminal experience, to improve staff-mother interactions and to facilitate mothers' opportunities to be primary caregivers. 

  • 7.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UK ; Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thomson, Gill
    University of Central Lancashire.
    Ekenberg, Linda
    Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UK.
    Löwegren, Linda
    Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UK.
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Influence of NICU co-care facilities and skin-to-skin contact on maternal stress in mothers of preterm infants2013In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 107-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the influence of co-care facilities and amount of skin-to-skin contact during Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) stay on maternal stress in mothers of preterm infants at two months corrected age.

    Methods:  A prospective cohort study that involved 300 mothers of pre-term infants was conducted in four NICUs (two with co-care facilities and two with non co-care) in Sweden. Data on duration of skin-to-skin contact per day for all days admitted to the NICU were collected using self-reports. Maternal stress was measured by the Swedish Parental Stress Questionnaire (SPSQ) at two months of infant’s corrected age.

    Results: Mothers whose infants were cared for in a NICU with co-care facilities reported significantly lower levels of stress in the dimension of ‘incompetence’ compared to mothers whose infants had been cared for in non co-care NICUs.  The amount of skin-to- skin experienced during the neonatal stay was not significantly associated with levels of maternal stress at two months corrected age.

    Conclusion:  The finding that mothers who do not experience co-care facilities experience greater levels of stress in relation to feelings of incompetence is of concern. Improvements to NICU environments are needed to ensure that mother-infant dyads are not separated.

  • 8. Kiruja, J.
    et al.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Egal, J. A.
    Essén, B.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Maternal near-miss and death incidences – Frequencies, causes and the referral chain in Somaliland: A pilot study using the WHO near-miss approach2017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 12, p. 30-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Somaliland is a self-declared country with a population of 3.5 million. Most of its population reside in rural areas. The objective of this pilot near-miss study was to monitor the frequency and causes of maternal near-miss and deaths and the referral chain for women to access Skilled Birth Attendants (SBA). Method: A facility-based study of all maternal near-miss and mortality cases over 5 months using the WHO near-miss tool in a main referral hospital. Reasons for bypassing the Antenatal Care facility (ANC) and late arrival to the referral hospital were investigated through verbal autopsy. Results: One hundred and thirty-eight (138) women with severe maternal complications were identified: 120 maternal near-miss, 18 maternal deaths. There were more near-miss cases on arrival (74.2%) compared with events that developed inside the hospital (25.8%). Likewise, there were more maternal deaths (77.8%) on arrival than was the case during hospitalization (22.2%). The most common mode of referral among maternal near-miss events was family referrals (66.7%). Of 18 maternal deaths, 15 were family referrals. Reasons for bypassing ANC were as follows: lack of confidence in the service provided; lack of financial resources; and lack of time to visit ANC. Reasons for late arrival to the referral hospital were as follows: lack of knowledge and transportation; and poor communication. Conclusion and clinical implication: To increase the utilization of ANC might indirectly lower the number of near-miss and death events. Collaboration between ANC staff and referral hospital staff and a more comprehensive near-miss project are proposed. © 2017 Elsevier B.V.

  • 9.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet.
    Graner, Sophie
    Phuc, Ho Dang
    Höjer, Bengt
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Johansson, Annika
    Pregnancies and births among adolescents: a population based prospective study in rural Vietnam2010In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 15-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To describe birth rates and pregnancy outcomes, specifically stillbirth, preterm delivery and low birth weight (LBW) in relation to socio-demographic characteristics, among adolescent women in a rural district in northern Vietnam.

    Material and method. Within an epidemiological field laboratory, quarterly surveillance of 7767 adolescent women in the ages 15–19 during the period January 1999 to December 2005 was conducted. Birth rates were calculated and pregnancy outcomes were described in relation to background factors.

    Result. A total of 1021 pregnancies were reported by 926 adolescent women during the period of whom 17% were below 18years. The estimated adolescent birth rate during 1999–2005 was 27/1000 women-years. The incidence of stillbirth among all births was 19/1000 births. These were more likely to be delivered preterm. The incidence of preterm deliveries and LBW infants was 193 and 75 per 1000 live births, respectively. There were no differences in socio-demographic background for stillbirth, preterm delivery or LBW.

    Conclusion. Adolescent birth rates were similar to those found in the recent Vietnamese DHS and considerably lower than the average for South-East Asia. Higher rates of stillbirth and preterm delivery were found than those previously reported for Vietnam, indicating the need for careful monitoring of adolescent pregnancies and their infants. Further research is needed to explore if and how much socio-demographic variables influence pregnancy outcome, comparing more differentiated groups, as a basis for interventions to assure access to adequate reproductive health care services for all women.

  • 10. Larsson, Erin C
    et al.
    Fried, Sarah
    Essén, Birgitta
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska Institutet.
    Equitable abortion care: A challenge for health care providers. Experiences from abortion care encounters with immigrant women in Stockholm, Sweden2016In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 10, p. 14-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To explore health care providers' experiences of providing care to immigrant women seeking abortion care.

    Methods

    A qualitative study including interviews with ten midwives and three medical doctors at four abortion clinics in the Stockholm area. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis.

    Results

    Initially, health care providers were reluctant to make statements concerning the specific needs among immigrant women. Yet, the health care providers sometimes found it challenging to deal with the specific needs among immigrant, mostly non-European, women. Three themes were identified: (1) Reluctance to acknowledge specific needs among immigrant women; (2) Striving to provide contraceptive counselling to immigrant women; (3) Organizational barriers hindering patient-centred abortion care to immigrant women

    Conclusions

    Health care providers' experiences of the specific needs among non-European, immigrant women are not openly discussed, although they are acknowledged. To achieve equitable access to sexual and reproductive health (SRH), health care providers need to be better equipped when encountering immigrant women in abortion care, especially regarding contraceptive counselling. The potential impact of patients' knowledge, norms and values is not adequately dealt with in the clinical encounter. Moreover, to provide patient-centred care, it is crucial to understand how to develop and implement SRH care that ensures equal access to high-quality care.

  • 11.
    Lindgren, Helena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    She leads, he follows - fathers' experiences of a planned home birth: a Swedish interview study2011In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 65-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To gain an understanding of fathers' experiences of a planned home birth.

    Study design: In-depth interviews were conducted with eight Swedish fathers who had the experience of a total of 23 births, of which 17 were planned home births. The fathers were recruited by the midwives who had assisted with the planned home births. Content analysis was used.

    Results: Analysis revealed the main theme "she leads - he follows". The fathers were compliant to the woman's decision; they also described it as a deliberate choice and struggled with feelings of being different in comparison with the established way of becoming a father.

    Conclusion: The experience of a planned home birth for the father was a process in which he had to put his own ideas on giving birth aside and carefully follow his woman. Sharing fears and happiness during the process by being compliant to the woman may strengthen the new fatherhood. The fathers' role in the process of making an unconventional choice is an example that could probably be applied to similar situations in pregnancy and childbirth.

  • 12.
    Malm, Mari-Cristin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Sahlgrenska Akademin, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Rubertsson, Christine
    Kvinnor och Barns Hälsa, Uppsala Universitet.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Kvinnor och Barns Hälsa, Uppsala Universitet.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Development of a tool to evaluate fetal movements in full-term pregnancy2014In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 31-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To study women’s description of fetal movements in full-term pregnancy. Further to investigate if their descriptions could be sorted with regard to intensity and type of movements, using a matrix under development to be a tool for evaluating fetal movements in clinical praxis.

    Methods: Data were collected by distributing questionnaires including an open question: “Please describe your perception of the baby’s movements during this gestational week.” A matrix listed seven categories of movements divided into powerful and non-powerful movements, was used for the content analysis.

    Results: 393 (78%) women responded to the open question. The movements were split into two domains: Powerful movements and Non-powerful movements. Altogether, 383 (96%) women perceived fetal movements that were sorted as powerful movement: firm, slow stretchinglarge and side to side. Ten (4%) women described movements exclusively, i.e. movements that did not include any of the movements in the powerful domain. Most women perceived movements that corresponded to more than one type of category, and all movements described by the women could be referred to at least one of the categories in the matrix.

    Conclusion: The matrix was useful for identification of the women’s perceptions of fetal movements in full-term pregnancy. Further studies are needed in order to develop the tool and its potential to evaluate the well-being of the fetus before it is to be used in clinical praxis.

  • 13.
    Malm, Mari-Cristin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Waiting in no-man's-land: mothers´experiences before the induction of labor after their baby has died in utero2011In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 2, no 2, p. 51-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Carrying death instead of life is beyond understanding and a huge psychological challenge for apregnant mother. The aim of this study was to investigate the mothers’ experiences of the time from thediagnosis of the death of their unborn baby until induction of labour.

    Method: In this qualitative study, in-depth interviews were conducted with 21 mothers whose babieshad died prior to birth. The interviews were then analysed using content analysis.

    Results: The overall theme that emerged from the mothers’ experiences is understood as ‘‘waiting in noman’s-land’’, describing the feeling of being set aside from normality and put into an area which is unrecognized. Four categories were established: ‘involuntary waiting’ describes the sense of being left withoutinformation about what is to come; ‘handling the unimaginable’ concerns the confusing state of findingoneself in the worst-case scenario and yet having to deal with the birth; ‘broken expectations’ is aboutthe loss not only of the baby but also of future family life; and ‘courage to face life’ describes the determinationto go on and face reality.

    Conclusions: The mother’s experiences during the time after the information of their baby’s death in uterountil the induction of labour can be understood as a sense of being in no-man’s-land, waiting withoutknowing for what or for how long.

  • 14. Mattebo, M.
    et al.
    Bogren, M.
    Brunner, N.
    Dolk, A.
    Pedersen, Christina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Perspectives on adolescent girls’ health-seeking behaviour in relation to sexual and reproductive health in Nepal2019In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 20, p. 7-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    To explore health care providers’ perspectives on adolescent girls’ health-seeking behaviour in Nepal in relation to their sexual and reproductive health and rights. Twenty health-care providers were included in this interview study. Ethical approval was obtained from the Nepal Health Research Council.

    Findings

    The main category ‘Barriers affect adolescent girls’ health-seeking behaviour in relation to their sexual and reproductive health’ was divided into five categories: a conservative society with social stigma; lack of information, education and knowledge; lack of facilities and respectful care; insufficient confidentiality and privacy; and unmet needs of adolescent-friendly facilities.

    Conclusions

    Lack of knowledge among adolescent girls and unmet needs of adolescent-friendly facilities affect their access to sexual and reproductive health care in Nepal. Lack of knowledge could be seen as a barrier, and as a reason why adolescent girls do not seek sexual and reproductive health care.

  • 15. Mohamoud Osman, Hodan
    et al.
    Ali Egal, Jama
    Kiruja, Jonah
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Women’s experiences of stillbirth in Somaliland: A phenomenological description2017In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 107-111Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Low- and middle-income countries in Africa have the highest rates of stillbirths in the world today: as such, the stories of the grief of these women who have had a stillbirth in these settings need to be told and the silence on stillbirth needs to be broken. In an attempt to fill this gap, the aim of this study was to describe the experiences of Muslim Somali mothers who have lost their babies at birth.

    Method: Qualitative interviews with ten Somali women one to six months after they experienced a stillbirth. Data were analyzed using Giorgi's method of phenomenological description.

    Results: In the analysis, four descriptive structures emerged: “a feeling of alienation”; “altered stability in life”; “immediate pain when the sight of the dead baby turns into a precious memory”; and “a wave of despair eases”. Together, these supported the essence: “Balancing feelings of anxiety, fear and worries for one's own health and life by accepting Allah's will and putting one's trust in him”.

    Conclusions: This study makes an important contribution to our knowledge about how stillbirth is experienced by women in Somaliland. This information can be useful when health care providers communicate the experiences of stillbirth to women of Muslim faith who have experienced an intrauterine fatal death (IUFD) resulting in a stillbirth. 

  • 16. Rådestad, Ingela
    et al.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Women’s perceptions of fetal movements in full-term pregnancy2012In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 113-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Råssjö, Eva-Britta
    et al.
    Falun Cent Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Falun, Sweden; Clin Res Ctr, Dalarna, Sweden.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Falun Cent Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Falun, Sweden; Dalarna Univ, Sch Hlth & Social Sci, Falun, Sweden.
    Samir, Raghad
    Falun Cent Hosp, Dept Obstet & Gynaecol, Falun, Sweden ; Clin Res Ctr, Dalarna, Sweden.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska Inst, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, S-10401 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Somali women’s use of maternity health services and the outcome of their pregnancies: a descriptive study comparing Somali migrants with inborn Swedish Women2013In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To describe how Somali immigrant women in a Swedish county access and use the antenatal care and health services, their reported and observed health problems and the outcome of their pregnancies.

    Study design: Retrospective, descriptive study, comparing data obtained from the records of antenatal and obstetric care for Somali born women with the same data for parity matched women born in Sweden giving birth between 2001 and 2009.

    Main outcome measures: Utilisation of antenatal health care (timing and number of visits), pregnancy complications (severe hyperemesis, anaemia, preeclampsia, urinary tract infections), mode of birth (normal vaginal, operative vaginal, caesarean), and infant outcomes (preterm birth, birth weight, and perinatal mortality)

    Results: Compared to the 523 Swedish-born women the 262 Somali women booked later and made less visits for antenatal care. They were more likely to have anaemia, severe hyperemesis and recurrent urinary tract infection. Emergency caesarean section (OR 9.90, CI 1.16-3.10), especially before start of labour (OR 4.96, CI 1.73-14.22), high perinatal mortality  with seven versus one perinatal deaths and small for date infants (OR 2.95, CI 1.49-5.82) was also more prevalent.

    Conclusion: Pregnant Somali immigrant women constitutes a vulnerable group that needs targeted attention. There is an increased risk for intrauterine foetal death, small for date and low birth weight infants as well as serious maternal morbidity.

     

     

     

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