du.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Leksell, Janeth
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Gardulf, Ann
    Department of Labaratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Jan
    The Department of Health Science, Faculity of Health, Science, and Technology, Karlstad University, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Lepp, Margret
    The Institute of Health and Care Science, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Self-reported conflict management competence among nursing students on the point of graduating and registered nurses with professional experience2015In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 5, no 8, p. 82-89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: It has been shown that specific competence is necessary for preventing and managing conflicts in healthcare settings. The aim of this descriptive and correlation study was to investigate and compare the self-reported conflict management competence (CMC) of nursing students who were on the point of graduating (NSPGs), and the CMC of registered nurses (RNs) with professional experience.

    Methods: The data collection, which consisted of soliciting answers to items measuring CMC in the Nurse Professional Competence (NPC) Scale, was performed as a purposive selection of 11 higher education institutions (HEIs) in Sweden. Three CMC items from the NPC Scale were answered by a total of 569 nursing students who were on the point of graduating and 227 RN registered nurses with professional experience.

    Results: No significant differences between NSPGs and RNs were found, and both groups showed a similar score pattern, with the lowest score for the item: “How do you perceive your ability to develop the group and strengthen competence in conflict management and problem-solving, based on knowledge of group dynamics?”. RNs with long professional experience (>24 months) rated their overall CMC as significantly better than RNs with short (<24 months) professional experience did (p = .05). NSPGs who had experience of international studies during their nursing education reported higher CMC, compared with those who did not have this experience (p = .03). RNs who reported a high degree of utilisation of CMC during the previous month scored higher regarding self-reported overall CMC (p < .0001).

    Conclusions: Experience of international studies during nursing education, or long professional experience, resulted in higher self-reported CMC. Hence, the CMC items in the NPC Scale can be suitable for identifying self-reported conflict management competence among NSPGs and RNs

  • 2.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Williamn, Christine
    Florida Atlantic University.
    Swall, Anna
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Engström, Gabriella
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Humming as a mean of communicating during meal time situations: A Single Case study involving a women with severe dementia and her caregiver2012In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 93-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    ‘Music Therapeutic Caregiving’, when caregivers sing for or together with persons with dementia during morning care situations, has been shown to increase verbal and nonverbal communication between persons with dementia and their caregivers, as well as enhance positive and decrease negative emotions in persons with dementia. No studies about singing during mealtimes have been conducted, and this pilot project was designed to elucidate this. However, since previous studies have shown that there is a risk that persons with dementia will start to sing along with the caregiver, the caregiver in this study hummed such that the person with dementia did not sing instead of eat. The aim of this pilot project was threefold: to describe expressed emotions in a woman with severe dementia, and describe communication between her and her caregivers without and with the caregiver humming. The aim was also to measure food and liquid intake without and with humming.

    Method: The study was constructed as a Single Case ABA design in which the ordinary mealtime constituted a baseline which comprised a woman with severe dementia being fed by her caregivers in the usual way. The intervention included the same woman being fed by the same caregiver who hummed while feeding her. Data comprised video observations that were collected once per week over 5 consecutive weeks. The Verbal and Nonverbal Interaction Scale and Observed Emotion Rating Scale were used to analyze the recorded interactions.

    Results:

    A slightly positive influence of communication was shown for the woman with dementia, as well as for the caregiver. Further, the women with dementia showed a slight increase in expressions of positive emotions, and she ate more during the intervention.

    Conclusion:

    Based on this pilot study no general conclusions can be drawn. It can be concluded, however, that humming while feeding persons with dementia might slightly enhance communication, and positive expressed emotions in persons with dementia. To confirm this, more studies on group levels are needed. Because previous studies have found that caregiver singing during caring situations influences persons with dementia positively it might be desirable to test the same during mealtime.

  • 3. Mattsson, Janet
    et al.
    Forsner, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Castrén, Maaret
    Bolander Laksov, Klara
    Arman, Maria
    A qualitative national study of nurses’ clinical knowledge development of pain in pediatric intensive care2012In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 2, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Vulnerable children undergoing intensive care might still experience pain when they should not, due tonurses and pediatricians insufficient knowledge about how critical illness affects childrens’ signs of pain. How signs ofpain are learned in clinical practice might be one of the remaining aspects in nurses insufficient pain alleviation. In theworkplace learning is directed by what the units shared meaning finds as significant and meaningful to learn. However,what it is viewed as meaningful to learn about pain from the nurses’ perspective might not be meaningful from the child’sperspective. When working together in the PICU, nurses rely on each other and interact in many ways, and theirunderstanding is related to situated knowledge and facilitated by a personal reference group of colleagues. Professionalconcern, depending on culture, traditions, habits, and workplace structures forms the clinical learning patterns in thePICU. However little is known about nurses’ clinical learning patterns or collegial facilitation within the PICU. Theseassumptions lead to the aim of the study: to elucidate patterns in clinical knowledge development and unfold the role offacilitator nurses in relation to pain management in the PICU.

    Method: The study had a qualitative interpretive design approach using semi-structured interviews, analyzed withqualitative content analysis to elucidate both manifest and latent content.

    Results: The findings elucidates that the workplace culture supports or hinders learning and collaboration. Knowledgedevelopment within practice is closely connected to the workplace culture and to nurses’ significant networks. Thefindings also clarify that nurses needs to feel safe in the workplace and on an individual level to build and rely onsignificant networks that facilitates their own personal knowledge development. There is an ongoing interaction betweenthe learning patterns and the facilitation the significant networks offer.

    Conclusions: Nurses need to embrace effective learning about children’s pain from day one. Lack of a facilitatingstructure for learning, lack of assessment within clinical practice, and the focus on the individual nurses’ learning areremaining considerable problems when it comes to alleviating the vulnerable child’s pain. To increase the possibility ofpain alleviation in the clinical setting, it is of importance to attend to the caring culture and build a safe collaborative culture that is patient centered. This requires an environment that allows for open discussion, where questioning andreflecting is a natural part of the culture within the group. These factors need highlighting and thorough examination fromthe organization. Nurses focus on learning, and interact in a learning community of practice that is furthered when theyexperience a safe environment and find that their questions are taken seriously. Approaches to promote a scholarship ofnursing care are needed to develop clinical learning and, consequently, raise the quality of pain care.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf