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  • 1.
    de Bernardi, Cecilia
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Tourism Studies.
    Edelheim, J.
    Crossley, É.
    The Role of Catteries and Boarding Kennels In Enabling Tourist Mobility2022In: Tourism, Culture & Communication, ISSN 1098-304X, E-ISSN 1943-4146, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 387-392Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Pets are increasingly being recognized as family members, leaving their owners with difficult decisions about how to care for them during periods of travel. Tourists can either travel with their pets, leave them in the care of family or friends, or use a paid service provided by an animal boarding facility or “pet hotel.” We empirically explore the latter option and theorize pet hotels as enablers of tourist mobility in tourist-generating regions. User-generated content (UGC) consisting of textual pet owner reviews on Google Reviews and Facebook from boarding kennels and catteries across six countries are analyzed using qualitative content analysis. We identify three key themes revealing what users of these services emphasize in their reviews: first, catteries and boarding kennel enable pet owners to travel; second, these facilities alleviate tourists’ feelings of guilt or worry; third, pets are imagined to be enjoying their own holidays while at the facilities. This research note sheds light on a growing cultural phenomenon relating to tourism among a globally mobile population for whom pets substitute or extend their human families. © 2022 Cognizant, LLC.

  • 2.
    Hanefors, Monica
    Dalarna University, School of Education and Humanities, Social Anthropology.
    Book review: The Tourist Experience2003In: Tourism, Culture & Communication, ISSN 1098-304X, E-ISSN 1943-4146, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 177-178Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Heldt Cassel, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Human Geography.
    de Bernardi, Cecilia
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Tourism Studies.
    Visual representations of indigenous tourism places in social media2021In: Tourism, Culture & Communication, ISSN 1098-304X, E-ISSN 1943-4146, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 95-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focused the analysis on social media representations of Sapmi using the hashtags #visit-sapmi and #visitsapmi, which nuance official, top-down versions of the place communicated in other contexts, but simultaneously are more focused on visitors and their experiences. The results show that the making of the Sapmi region as a place and a tourism destination through social media content is an ongoing process of interpretation and reinterpretation of what indigenous Sami culture is and how it connects to specific localities. Future research should look at the broader understanding of places that can be accessed through social media analysis. The main argument is that visual communication is a very important tool when constructing the brand of a destination. Considering the growing role of social media, the process of place-making through visual communication is explored in the case of the destination VisitSapmi, as it is coconstructed in online user generated content (UGC). From a theoretical viewpoint, we discuss the social construction of places and destinations as well as the production of meaning through coconstruction of images and brands in tourism contexts. The focus is on how places are created, branded, and made meaningful by visualizing the place in a framework of tourism experiences, in this case specifically examined through indigenous tourism. We use a content analysis of texts, photographs, and narratives communicated on social media platforms. Regardless of negotiated brand management's efforts at official marketing, branding, and tourism planning, the evolution of Sapmi as a place to visit in social media has its own logic, full of contradictions and plausible interpretations, related to the uncontrollable and bottom-up processes of UGC.

  • 4.
    Heldt Cassel, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Hay Walters, Nicole
    School of Hospitality and Tourism Management, College of Business and Management,.
    Still a white paradise?: Photographic representations of Jamaica as a tourism destination2016In: Tourism, Culture & Communication, ISSN 1098-304X, E-ISSN 1943-4146, Vol. 16, no 1/2, p. 59-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Visual images, from travel brochures and television commercials to internet advertisements, represent a powerful element of tourist destination marketing. This article seeks to understand how destination marketing represents people and places through visual images while examining the role of tourism discourse in the construction of cultural meanings and identity. Using Jamaica as a case study, the researchers explore the issue of contemporary touristic images. A combination of content and discourse analysis was used to examine images included in printed marketing materials and on the DMO’s website drawing upon postcolonial theory as a critical and contextual perspective that provides an interpretation of the meanings that are conveyed by these representations. The main findings indicate that decades after the end of colonialism in Jamaica, marketers perpetuate the presentation of paradisal destination images using visual representations. It is argued that colonial tropes and practices of “Othering” remain fundamental to the meaning and rationale of seeing Jamaica and the travel experience. However, this study also identified strategies that could be further explored in an effort to counteract colonial discourse, as the use of culture and local folkways opens up avenues for the (re)evaluation and (re)representation of Jamaica and the holiday experience

  • 5.
    Heldt Cassel, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Pashkevich, Albina
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Tourism Studies.
    Tourism development in the Russian Arctic: Reproducing or challenging the hegemonic masculinities of the frontier2018In: Tourism, Culture & Communication, ISSN 1098-304X, E-ISSN 1943-4146, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 67-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The image of the Arctic can be understood as a part of a larger discourse of the north as an uncivilized, untamed frontier, not suitable or accessible for modern, urban people, but a place for strong adventurers, hunters, and explorers. In this study, we seek to understand how hegemonic masculinities of the north both inform and are challenged by tourism and its representations and practices in the Russian Arctic, in particular the Nenets Autonomous District (NAD). The study is based on the analysis of data collected during several field trips to the region during the period of 2012-2013 and 2014, including semistructured interviews with key stakeholders and observations of tourism practices, as well as content analysis of promotional images of selected tourism companies. Tourism in the NAD is typically adventure based: snowmobile safaris, fishing, hunting, and white-water rafting. There are also different types of indigenous tourism, such as living with reindeer herders for a period of time. The tourism industry covered herein consisted of microfirms and small businesses. The entrepreneurs were all middle-aged Russian men and the tourists were predominantly male middle class Russians from metropolitan regions, traveling as groups of friends or colleagues. The results show that despite the willingness of the tourism entrepreneurs to broaden their customer groups and offerings, the products reproduce the destination as a playground for (male) "hook and bullet" tourists. However, there are also examples of how tourism may challenge or reconstruct the understandings of typically masculine or feminine duties or roles in some specific local contexts.

  • 6.
    Mörner, Cecilia
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Heldt Cassel, Susanna
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    The Legacy of Mining: Visual Representations and Narrative Constructions of a Swedish Heritage Tourist Destination2011In: Tourism, Culture & Communication, ISSN 1098-304X, E-ISSN 1943-4146, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines the marketing and management efforts that have been undertaken to make the Falun World Heritage Site a successful tourist destination in terms of hegemonic, visual representations and narrative constructions. Visual representation is assumed to be a vital aspect of the construction of narratives used to promote tourist destinations. The idea of a narrative as something that constructs sites as comprehensible places through visual representation can be used to illuminate the logic of heritage tourism and branding destinations. The paper argues that representations of a heritage site that are closely related to hegemonic ideas of the site’s history are not necessarily the most profitable ones. If the heritage site is to contribute to local development and tourism, it is essential to understand what the representations of heritage communicate. Using the Falun World Heritage Site as a case study, the article aims to show how the attraction of a site can be hindered by hegemonic assumptions of its history, and therefore of its most interesting and valuable aspects. Analyses of Falun’s marketing, as well as the site itself, show that the constructed hegemonic narratives about the Falun Mine primarily concern men, masculinity and nationalism. Visitors are offered an opportunity to take part through narratives of the Swedish Great Power Period, as constructed and experienced by male geniuses and male mineworkers. These are the stories that correspond to the hegemonic view of those who manage and market the site.

  • 7.
    Nowak, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Tourism Studies.
    Book Review: Handbook of Social Tourism2022In: Tourism, Culture & Communication, ISSN 1098-304X, E-ISSN 1943-4146, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 101-103Article, book review (Other academic)
1 - 7 of 7
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