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  • 1.
    Olsson, Helén
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Reducing violence in forensic care: how does it resemble the domains of a recovery-oriented care?2016In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 506-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Forensic psychiatry is characterized by involuntary treatment and risk of violence. The concept of recovery is rarely in focus as the primary focus is on risk assessment, violence prevention and reducing coercion in care.

    Aim: To determine what resources forensic staff use to avoid or prevent violent situations, and to explore how these practices resemble the domains of recovery-oriented care.

    Method: Semi-structured interviews with staff who were identified by forensic patients as key workers in their recovery process. Interview texts were analyzed using interpretive content analysis.

    Results: Staff prevent violent situations using tacit knowledge and experience, and through a shared collegial responsibility. Staff safeguard patients, encourage patient participation, and provide staff consistency.

    Conclusions: The results have implications for forensic care as well as psychiatry regarding the process of making recovery a reality for patients in the forensic care setting.

  • 2. Rosenberg, David
    et al.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Nyholm, Maria
    Grim, Katarina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Svedberg, Petra
    Shared decision making in Swedish community mental health services - an evaluation of three self-reporting instruments.2017In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 142-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite the potential impact of shared decision making on users satisfaction with care and quality in health care decisions, there is a lack of knowledge and skills regarding how to work with shared decision making among health care providers.

    AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of three instruments that measure varied dimensions of shared decision making, based on self-reports by clients, in a Swedish community mental health context.

    METHOD: The study sample consisted of 121 clients with experience of community mental health care, and involved in a wide range of decisions regarding both social support and treatment. The questionnaires were examined for face and content validity, internal consistency, test-retest reliability and construct validity.

    RESULTS: The instruments displayed good face and content validity, satisfactory internal consistency and a moderate to good level of stability in test-retest reliability with fair to moderate construct correlations, in a sample of clients with serious mental illness and experience of community mental health services in Sweden.

    CONCLUSIONS: The questionnaires are considered to be relevant to the decision making process, user-friendly and appropriate in a Swedish community mental health care context. They functioned well in settings where non-medical decisions, regarding social and support services, are the primary focus. The use of instruments that measure various dimensions of the self-reported experience of clients, can be a key factor in developing knowledge of how best to implement shared decision making in mental health services.

  • 3.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för socialt arbete - Socialhögskolan.
    How men and women in recovery make meaning to severe mental illness2009In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 433-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Creating a new meaning of the illness, changing values and expectations due to the illness are seen as important factors in recovery from mental illness.

    Aims: In this study, conducted in Sweden, male and female meaning making of severe mental illness is explored and how these meanings compass the recovery process.

    Method: Through 30 in-depth interviews male and female meaning of mental illness are explored through a grounded theory analysis. Results: In the process of making meaning illness reason emerged as the core category. But the reasons differed both in relation to gender and within the two genders. Four patterns of response were found in the analysis of the material. These four patterns influenced how the recovery process was encompassed. Three of the four groups were restructing the meaning of the illness in a more favorable way contributing to a redirection of life towards authenticity.

    Conclusions: The results underline a demand for further research on recovery achievements connected to meaning making and changes in attitude. One such area is to create a meaning in one’s life where gender is reconsidered in relation to the individual’s capacity and life situation.

  • 4.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Recovery in involuntary psychiatric care: is there a gender difference?2013In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 420-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Research on recovery from mental illness and the influence of compulsory psychiatric institutional care has revealed the complexity of this concept. There is also limited knowledge regarding the impact of gender-role expectations in these contexts, and how such expectations may influence both the care and individuals’ recovery processes.

    Aim: To explore women’s and men’s perceptions of the impact of compulsory inpatient care on recovery from severe mental illness.

    Method: Grounded theory was used to analyse 30 first-person accounts of recovery from mental illness, elicited via interviews with individuals who had been compulsorily treated in hospital and diagnosed with a severe mental illness.

    Results: Inpatient care at an early stage was crucial for the informants’ recovery. However, there was ambivalence in their perceptions of the impact of compulsory inpatient care. The narratives confirmed gender differences as well as gender stereotypes.

    Conclusions: The results have implications for recovery research, in that they emphasise the importance of understanding recovery as a gender-influenced process.

  • 5.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Rosenberg, David
    Department of Social Work, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden .
    Transplanting recovery?: Research and practice in the Nordic countries2013In: Journal of Mental Health, ISSN 0963-8237, E-ISSN 1360-0567, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 563-569Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The conceptual framework which describes recovery from mental illness is based primarily on studies conducted in English-speaking countries. Knowledge and development of recovery orientation within other cultures and mental health systems is still limited.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to compile, describe, and discuss the research on personal recovery and recovery-oriented practice within the psychiatric and social fields in the Nordic countries.   

    Method: A systematic literature review of Nordic research on recovery from mental illness.

     

    Results: The research literature is limited, and primarily replicates designs and confirms findings first presented in studies conducted in the USA and Great Britain.

    The majority of the studies are qualitative, and point to the importance of social relations, environmental factors, and peer support.

     

    Conclusions: There is a need to identify and describe factors in Nordic mental health systems that may influence the recovery process. A corresponding challenge will be to translate and further develop outcome indicators that can promote a recovery-oriented health system.

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