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  • 1.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Cronqvist, Agneta
    Lützén, Kim
    Andershed, Birgitta
    A lonely life journey bordered with struggle: Being a sibling of an individual with psychosis2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 157-164Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    An integrative review of what contributes to personal recovery in psychiatric disabilities2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 185-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this integrated literature review is to identify what people with psychiatric disabilities experience as contributing to their personal recovery. The study design is based on Whittemore and Knafl's integrative review and includes 14 qualitative peer-reviewed articles. The analysis reveals three main themes: recovery as an inner process; recovery as a contribution from others; and recovery as participating in social and meaningful activities. If mental health nurses adhere to the personal recovery perspective, nursing practice will focus on the patients' needs, conveying hope and supporting the patient in the recovery process.

  • 3.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Röda Korset Högskola.
    Panoptic power and mental health nursing: space and surveillance in relation to staff, patients and neutral places2012In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 33, no 8, p. 500-504Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mental health nurses use manifest and latent approaches for surveillance and observation of patients in the context of mental health care. Patient spaces in mental health organizations are subtly linked to these different means of surveillance. This article investigates these approaches, focusing in particular on the variety of spaces patients occupy and differences in the intensity of observation that can be carried out in them. The aim is to elaborate on space and surveillance in relation to the patients’ and nurses’ environment in psychiatric nursing care. Places where patients were observed were operationalized and categorized, yielding three spaces: those for patients, those for staff, and neutral areas. We demonstrate that different spaces produce different practices in relation to the exercise of panoptic power and that there is room for maneuvering and engaging in alternatives to “keeping an eye on patients” for nurses in mental health nursing. Some spaces offer asylum from panoptic observations and the viewing eyes of psychiatric nurses, but the majority of spaces in mental health nursing serve as a field of visibility within which the patient is constantly watched.

  • 4.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Lützén, Kim
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Ivarsson, Ann-Britt
    Örebro Universitet.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Röda Korset Högskola.
    Achieving equilibrium in a culture of stability: cultural knowing in nursing on psychiatric intensive care units2011In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 255-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents intensive psychiatric nurses' work and nursing care. The aim of the study was to describe expressions of cultural knowing in nursing care in psychiatric intensive care units (PICU). Spradley's ethnographic methodology was applied. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care in psychiatric intensive care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.

  • 5. Williams, C. L.
    et al.
    Newman, D.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Preliminary psychometric properties of the verbal and nonverbal interaction scale: An observational measure for communication in persons with dementia2017In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 38, no 5, p. 381-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little attention has been given to sociable/unsociable communication in persons with dementia despite the importance of these behaviors in maintaining engagement in marital relationships. An observational measure of verbal and nonverbal communication in persons with dementia (Verbal and Nonverbal Interaction Scale-CR) who were engaged in conversations with spouses was tested for reliability and validity. Married persons with dementia were video-recorded at home conversing with spouses over 10 weeks (N = 118 recordings). Reliability [inter-coder (.92), test-retest (r =.61-.77), internal consistency (α =.65 -.79)] were adequate. Following an intervention, the Verbal and Nonverbal Interaction Scale-CR predicted improved communication over 10 weeks. The ratio of sociable to unsociable communication improved by 4.46 points per session [β = 4.46, t(10) = 1.96, p =.039]. VNVIS-CR is recommended to describe sociable and unsociable communication in persons with dementia as they engage in conversations with spouses.

1 - 5 of 5
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