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  • 1.
    Mantell, Andy
    et al.
    School of Health and Social Care, London South Bank University, London, UK.
    Simpson, Grahame Kenneth
    Brain Injury Rehabilitation Research Group, Ingham Institute of Applied Medical Research, Sydney, Australia; Liverpool Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit, Liverpool Hospital, Sydney, Australia.
    Vungkhanching, Martha
    Department of Social Work Education, California State University, Fresno CA, USA.
    Jones, Kate Fiona
    Royal Rehab, Sydney NSW, Australia.
    Strandberg, Thomas
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för juridik, psykologi och socialt arbete.
    Simonson, Patti
    Licensed Social Worker in Private Practice, London, UK.
    Social work-generated evidence in traumatic brain injury from 1975 to 2014: A systematic scoping review2018Ingår i: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 26, nr 4, s. 433-448Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Network for Social Workers in Acquired Brain Injury (INSWABI) com-missioned a systematic scoping review to ascertain the social work-generated evidence base on people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) of working age. The review aimed to identify the output, impact and quality of publications authored by social workers on this topic. Study quality was evaluated through assessment frameworks drawn from the United Kingdom National Service Framework for Long- Term Conditions. In the 40- year period from 1975 to 2014, 115 items were published that met the search criteria (inter-vention studies, n = 10; observational studies, n = 52; literature reviews, n = 6; expert opinion or policy analysis, n = 39; and others, n = 8). The publications could be grouped into five major fields of practice: families, social inclusion, military, inequalities and psy-chological adjustment. There was a significant increase in the number of publications over each decade. Impact was demonstrated in that the great majority of publications had been cited at least once (80.6%, 103/115). Articles published in rehabilitation jour-nals were cited significantly more often than articles published in social work journals. A significant improvement in publication quality was observed across the four decades, with the majority of studies in the last decade rated as high quality.

  • 2.
    Marcheschi, Elizabeth
    et al.
    Chalmers Tekniska Högskola.
    von Koch, Lena
    Karolinska Institutet .
    Pessah-Rasmussen, Hélène
    Lunds Universitet.
    Elf, Marie
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Omvårdnad.
    Home setting after stroke, facilitators and barriers: a systematic literature review2018Ingår i: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 26, nr 4, s. E451-E459Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper seeks to improve the understanding of the interaction between patients with stroke and the physical environment in their home settings. Stroke care is increasingly performed in the patient's home. Therefore, a systematic review was conducted to identify the existing knowledge about facilitators and barriers in the physical environment of home settings for the stroke rehabilitation process. Based upon Arksey and O'Malley's framework, a Boolean search strategy was performed in the databases; CINAHL, Medline, Web of Science and Scopus. Fifteen articles were retained from the literature search conducted between August and November 2016, and two researchers independently assessed their quality based on the Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment guidelines. The results suggest that despite the healthcare system's ongoing shift towards home-based rehabilitation, the role played by the physical environment of home settings is still considered a side finding. Moreover, the research appears to focus mainly on how this environment supports mobility and activities of daily living, whereas information regarding the psychosocial and emotional processes that mediate the interaction between stroke survivors and their home setting are missing. A lack of information was also found with regard to the influence of different geographic locations on the stroke rehabilitation process. Future investigations are therefore needed to advance the understanding of the role played by the physical environment of home settings in supporting stroke recovery.

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  • 3.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Omvårdnad.
    Eriksson, Henrik
    Röda Korset Högskola.
    Fathers sharing about early parental support in healthcare: virtual discussions on an internet forum2013Ingår i: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 21, nr 4, s. 381-390Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    Becoming a father is a life changing event and this transition is associated with various emotions. Educational activities aimed at new parents are important in healthcare parental support (HCPS). HCPS has been critiqued for its predominant focus on mothers, while the needs of fathers seem to have been downplayed. As a result, fathers often turn to Internet-based forums for support. As virtual discussions and mutual support among fathers take place in cyberspace, it is important to monitor these forums to observe the ways in which the fathers discuss HCPS. The aim of this study is to explore the ways in which new fathers visiting an Internet-based forum for fathers communicated their experiences of HCPS. A netnographic method consisting of six steps was used to gather and analyse the data. The findings show that fathers shared with one another their experiences of the attitudes expressed by HCPS workers as well as their own attitudes towards HCPS. The attitudes of HCPS workers that were directed towards the fathers were perceived as highly personal and individual, while fathers described their attitudes towards the HCPS in general terms, towards HCPS as a system. Overall, the fathers described HCPS as a valuable confirmatory support that eased their worries concerning sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), colic, weight gain, fever and teething. Although the fathers expressed gratitude towards HCPS, they also shared their negative experiences, such as feeling invisible, disregarded and insulted. In fact, the twofold attitudes that exist in the relationship between the fathers and HCPS can act as a barrier rather than being a confirmatory support. We recommend that HCPS adopts a broader approach using more targeted and strategic didactic methods for supporting fathers in the growth of their own personal awareness, as such an approach would offer a competitive and professional alternative to the support offered in informal experience-based Internet forums.

  • 4.
    Vethanayagam, Natalie
    et al.
    Barnsley Hospital, Barnsley, United Kingdom.
    Orrell, Alison
    Bangor University, School of Social Sciences, Bangor, United Kingdom.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Socialt arbete.
    McKee, Kevin
    Högskolan Dalarna, Akademin Utbildning, hälsa och samhälle, Socialt arbete.
    Orme, Susan
    Barnsley Hospital, Barnsley, United Kingdom.
    Parker, Stuart G
    Newcastle University, Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle, United Kingdom.
    Gilhooly, Mary
    Brunel University London, Department of Clinical Sciences, London, United Kingdom.
    Understanding help-seeking in older people with urinary incontinence: An interview study2017Ingår i: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 25, nr 3, s. 1061-1069Artikel i tidskrift (Refereegranskat)
    Abstract [en]

    The prevalence of urinary incontinence (UI) increases with age and can negatively affect quality of life.  However, relatively few older people with UI seek treatment.  The aim of this study was to explore the views of older people with UI on the process of seeking help.

    Older people with UI were recruited to the study from three continence services in the north of England: a geriatrician-led hospital outpatient clinic (n=18), a community based nurse-led service (n=22) and a consultant gynaecologist-led service specialising in surgical treatment (n=10). Participants took part in semi-structured interviews, which were transcribed and underwent thematic content analysis.

    Three main themes emerged: Being brushed aside, in which participants expressed the feeling that general practitioners did not prioritise or recognise their concerns; Putting up with it, in which participants delayed seeking help for their UI due to various reasons including embarrassment, the development of coping mechanisms, perceiving UI as a normal part of the ageing process, or being unaware that help was available; and Something has to be done, in which help-seeking was prompted by the recognition that their UI was a serious problem, whether as a result of experiencing UI in public, the remark of a relative, the belief that they had a serious illness, or the detection of UI during comprehensive geriatric assessment.

    Greater awareness that UI is a treatable condition and not a normal part of ageing is needed in the population and amongst health professionals. Comprehensive geriatric assessment appeared an important trigger for referral and treatment in our participants.  Screening questions by health care professionals could be a means to identify, assess and treat older people with UI.

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