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  • 1.
    Brorsson, Sofia
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Nilsdotter, Anna
    Pedersen, Eja
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Bremander, Ann
    Lunds universitet.
    Thorstensson, Carina
    Lunds universitet.
    The relationship between finger flexion and extension force in healthy women and women with rheumatoid arthritis2012In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, ISSN 1650-1977, Vol. 44, no 7, p. 605-608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Balance between flexor and extensor muscle activity is essential for optimal function. The purpose of this pilot study was to compare the relationship between maximum finger flexion force and maximum finger extension force in women with rheumatoid arthritis and healthy women.

    METHODS:

    Twenty healthy women (median age 61 years) and 20 women with rheumatoid arthritis (median age 59.5 years, median disease duration 16.5 years) were included in the study. Finger extension force was measured with an electronic device, EX-it, and finger flexion force using Grippit. The Grip Ability Test and the score from the patient-reported outcome Disability Arm Shoulder and Hand were used to evaluate activity limitations.

    RESULTS:

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis showed significantly decreased hand function compared with healthy controls. A correlation was found between extension force and flexion force in the healthy group (r = 0.65, p = 0.002),but not in the rheumatoid arthritis group (r = 0.25, p = 0.289).

    CONCLUSION:

    Impaired hand function appears to influence the relationship between maximum finger flexion and extension force. This study showed a difference in the relationship between maximum finger flexion and extension force in healthy controls and those with rheumatoid arthritis.

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  • 2. Larsson, Anette
    et al.
    Palstam, Annie
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Löfgren, Monika
    Ernberg, Malin
    Bjersing, Jan
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Gerdle, Björn
    Kosek, Eva
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    Pain and fear avoidance partially mediate change in muscle strength during resistance exercise in women with fibromyalgia2017In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 49, no 9, p. 744-750Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Resistance exercise results in health benefits in fibromyalgia. The aim of this study was to determine the factors that mediate change in muscle strength in women with fibromyalgia as a result of resistance exercise.

    METHODS: Sixty-seven women with fibromyalgia (age range 25-64 years) were included. Tests of muscle strength and questionnaires related to pain, fear avoidance and physical activity were carried out. Multivariable stepwise regression was used to analyse explanatory factors for change and predictors for final values of knee-extension force, elbow-flexion force and hand-grip force.

    RESULTS: Change in knee-extension force was explained by fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity at baseline, together with change in pain intensity, knee-extension force at baseline, age and body mass index (BMI) (R2=0.40, p = 0.013). Change in elbow-flexion force was explained by pain intensity at baseline, together with baseline fear avoidance beliefs about physical activity, BMI and elbow-flexion force at baseline (R2 = 0.32, p = 0.043). Change in hand-grip force was explained by hand-grip force at baseline, change in pain intensity and baseline fear avoidance (R2 = 0.37, p = 0.009). Final muscle strength was predicted by the same variables as change, except pain.

    CONCLUSION: Pain and fear avoidance are important factors to consider in rehabilitation using resistance exercise for women with fibromyalgia.

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  • 3.
    Palstam, Annie
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Larsson, Anette
    Bjersing, Jan
    Löfgren, Monika
    Ernberg, Malin
    Bileviciute-Ljungar, Indre
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    Sjörs, Anna
    Larsson, Britt
    Mannerkorpi, Kaisa
    Perceived exertion at work in women with fibromyalgia: explanatory factors and comparison with healthy women.2014In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 773-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate perceived exertion at work in women with fibromyalgia.

    DESIGN: A controlled cross-sectional multi-centre study.

    SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seventy-three women with fibromyalgia and 73 healthy women matched by occupation and physical workload were compared in terms of perceived exertion at work (0-14), muscle strength, 6-min walk test, symptoms rated by Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), work status (25-100%), fear avoidance work beliefs (0-42), physical activity at work (7-21) and physical workload (1-5). Spearman's correlation coefficient and linear regression analysis were conducted.

    RESULTS: Perceived exertion at work was significantly higher in the fibromyalgia group than in the reference group (p = 0.002), while physical activity at work did not differ between the groups. Physical capacity was lower and symptom severity higher in fibromyalgia compared with references (p < 0.05). In fibromyalgia, perceived exertion at work showed moderate correlation with physical activity at work, physical workload and fear avoidance work beliefs (rs = 0.53-0.65, p < 0.001) and a fair correlation with anxiety (rs = 0.26, p = 0.027). Regression analysis indicated that the physical activity at work and fear avoidance work beliefs explained 50% of the perceived exertion at work.

    CONCLUSION: Women with fibromyalgia perceive an elevated exertion at work, which is associated with physical work-related factors and factors related to fear and anxiety.

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  • 4.
    Tseli, Elena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Karolinska Institutet.
    Vixner, Linda
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Lo Martire, Riccardo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Karolinska Institutet.
    Grooten, Wilhelmus J A
    Gerdle, Björn
    Äng, Björn
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Karolinska Institutet; Center for Clinical Research Dalarna - Uppsala University, Falun.
    Prognostic factors for improved physical and emotional functioning one year after interdisciplinary rehabilitation in patients with chronic pain: Results from a national quality registry in Sweden2020In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 52, no 2, article id UNSP jrm00019Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate prognostic factors for physical and emotional functioning following interdisciplinary multimodal pain rehabilitation, by targeting patients' baseline characteristics and health measures.

    METHODS: A prospective cohort of 2,876 patients from 38 specialist clinics across Sweden, who were completing interdisciplinary multimodal pain rehabilitation programmes, was followed through the Swedish Quality Registry for Pain Rehabilitation, from initial assessment to 12-month follow-up. Using logistic regression, baseline data were regressed to predict improvement in Physical functioning and Emotional functioning, fused by principal component analyses using the 36-item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS).

    RESULTS: Employment status emerged as having the largest effect sizes in both Physical functioning and Emotional functioning; Working: odds ratio (OR) 2.05 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.64-2.56) and OR 1.59 (95% CI 1.27-1.98), respectively. Strong beliefs in restored health, better initial emotional health, lower levels of pain and pain interference, and younger age all predicted Physical functioning. European origin, higher levels of general activity, and sense of life control all predicted Emotional functioning. Worse initial physical and emotional health predicted the corresponding dependent outcomes.

    CONCLUSION: Employment was consistently found to be an important prognostic factor, suggesting the significance of avoiding delay in interdisciplinary multimodal pain rehabilitation. A positive treatment expectancy was of importance. In general, multidimensional measures indicated that better initial status was more favourable; however, inconsistency implies a complex prognostic picture.

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  • 5.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala ; The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation/Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Department of Health Science/Health and Rehabilitation, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Implementation of evidence-based prevention of falls in rehabilitation units: a staff's interactive approach2009In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 13, p. 1034-1040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To provide strategies to assist healthcare professionals in the area of rehabilitation to improve prevention of falls. DESIGN: A conceptual framework is described as a foundation for the proposal of 2 intertwined strategies, of intervention and implementation, which target the questions: Which strategies for intervention represent the current best evidence? and: How can these strategies be implemented and continuously developed? RESULTS: Strategies for multifactorial and multiprofessional fall preventive interventions are presented in terms of a "fall prevention pyramid model", including general, individualized, and acute interventions. A systematic global fall risk rating by the staff is recommended as an initial procedure. Fall event recording and follow-up are stressed as important components of local learning and safety improvement. Development of implementation strategies in 3 phases, focusing on interaction, facilitation and organizational culture, is described. CONCLUSION: A well-developed patient safety culture focusing on prevention of falls will, when successfully achieved, be seen by staff, patients and their significant others as being characteristic of the organization, and will be evident in attitudes, routines and actions. Moreover, it provides potential for positive side-effects concerning organizational and clinical improvements in additional areas.

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