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  • 1.
    Bellardini, Helena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    Tonkonogi, Michail
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    Mckee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    The effect of gender on strength training in older people: a Swedish population study2012In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 27, no s1, p. 155-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physical exercise contributes to healthy ageing, and strength training has beenshown to improve independence in older people.

    Method: Six hundred older people wererandomly selected from the Swedish population, and sent a self-completion questionnaire(57% response rate, n¼343) examining exercise history, current strength training, andperceived benefits and barriers to strength training.

    Results: Gender was associated with aperceived positive effect of strength training on quality of life (Women 42% vs. Men 27%).The most commonly reported benefits of strength training were better mobility (71%), energy(70%), and muscle strength (69%), with most benefits endorsed more commonly by womenthan men. The most commonly reported barriers to strength training were believing otherforms of exercise more suitable (49%) and cost (20%; Women 31% vs. Men 13%).

    Discussion:To better promote healthy ageing, interventions should be embedded in an understanding ofthe effect of gender on exercise behaviour.

  • 2.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Austin, C
    Causal attributions following a fall and health outcomes at 6 months post-fall2009In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 24, no Suppl.1, p. 268-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Falls in older people decrease quality of life and increase mortality. There is littleresearch on perceptions of the cause of a fall and their influence on health outcomes. Method.A survey (N¼196) of older people hospitalised after a fall recorded attributions for the causeof the fall. A follow-up survey at 6 months measured functional limitation, anxiety anddepression. Findings. of the participants, 44.3% saw their fall as due to their character, 15.6%due to their behaviour, and 40.1% due to external factors. A hopelessness explanatory stylewas found in 21.1% of participants. Perceiving age as the cause of the fall predicted (p5.06)higher levels of depression at 6 months, while having hopelessness explanatory stylesignificantly predicted higher functional limitation (p¼.001). Discussion. Causal attributionsof fall events impact on physical and mental health outcomes, offering a route forpsychological intervention to reframe the meaning attached to a fall.

  • 3.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Bien, B
    Wojszel, B
    Kofahl, C
    Krevers, B
    Melchiorre, M G
    Mnich, E
    Prouskas, C
    The willingness of informal carers of older people to continue caring: results of the EUROFAMCARE study2010In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 25, no Suppl. 1, p. 59-59Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: The willingness to continue in the caregiving role has been shown to be one of the most significant factors in the breakdown of family care of an older person. Willingness to care was considered in the EUROFAMCARE study, which examined the characteristics of caregiving in six European countries. Methods: Nearly 6000 informal carers of older people (n = 1000 in Germany, Italy, Sweden, Greece, Poland and the UK) were recruited using a shared sampling protocol and interviewed using a standardized questionnaire. Logistic regression procedures determined the best model of willingness to care in each country. Results: Between 29% and 14% of the variance in willingness to care was explained by the models. No single variable was significant in the models across all countries, but the negative impact of care was associated with low willingness in five countries, while being a son/daughter carer was associated with high willingness in four. The category of variables that explained the most variance in willingness to care was ‘caregiving circumstances and relationships’. Conclusions: If a carer's motivation for caregiving is to be maintained, support for carers must adequately address any negative impact of their role, and use a relationship-centred approach.

  • 4.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Psychological, health and social predictors of emotional and social loneliness in older people2012In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 27, no s1, p. 89-90Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    The association between receipt of informal care and health in older people2011In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 26, no Suppl. 2, p. 173-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Older people as care-receivers are under-researched. We examined the health and well-being of older people with differing levels of care need and receipt. Methods: Community resident older people (N = 1250) from a single UK metropolitan area were randomly recruited, and completed a questionnaire on social exclusion via interview. Participants were categorised into one of the four groups: receiving informal care; receiving informal support; no receipt of informal care/support despite need and no receipt of informal care/support, no need. Findings: Associations (p < 0.001) between group membership and health status (F = 75.7), functional status (F = 159.1), well-being (F = 29.5) and loneliness (F = 28.9) indicated the ‘receiving care’ and ‘no receipt of care/support despite need’ groups had the poorest health profiles. Logistic regression determined primary predictors of group membership. Discussion: A significant group of older people receives no informal care/support despite frailty. Research is needed to determine why some older people do not receive informal care appropriate to their needs.

  • 6.
    McKee, Kevin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Schüz, Benjamin
    University of Tasmania.
    Psychosocial factors in healthy ageing2015In: Psychology and Health, ISSN 0887-0446, E-ISSN 1476-8321, Vol. 30, no 6, p. 607-626Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 6 of 6
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