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  • 1.
    Carlsson, Magnus
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Carlsson, Tomas
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Hammarström, Daniel
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    Granath, Johan
    Westergren, Jens
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    Malm, Christer
    Tonkonogi, Michail
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    Validation of off-season physiological tests with ski ranking in elite male junior cross-country skiing2012In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 44, no s2, p. 516-516Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2. Walsh, Brandon
    et al.
    Tonkonogi, Michail
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Malm, Christer
    Ekblom, Björn
    Sahlin, Kent
    Effect of eccentric exercise on muscle oxidative function in man.2001In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 436-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of eccentric exercise on muscle oxidative function. Methods: Thirteen subjects performed high-intensity eccentric cycling for 30 min. Muscle oxidative function in vastus lateralis was evaluated by measurements of respiration in permeabilized muscle fibers (skinned fibers) and from the kinetics of oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) saturation measured with near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). Results: After eccentric cycling, all subjects reported extensive delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), but plasma markers of muscle damage (creatine kinase and [beta]-glucuronidase activity) were not significantly altered. The half time of oxyHb desaturation after circulatory occlusion (128 +/- 11 s, mean +/- SE) and oxyHb resaturation after restoration of blood flow (13.8 +/- 0.7 s) were not significantly changed after eccentric cycling (N = 7). Respiration in skinned muscle fibers measured in the absence of ADP and in the presence of a submaximal (0.1 mM) or maximal ADP concentration (1 mM) was not significantly changed after eccentric cycling (N = 6). The sensitivity of respiration to ADP was not significantly changed after eccentric cycling. Conclusions: Muscle oxidative function (maximal respiration and respiratory control by ADP) was not compromised after high-intensity eccentric cycle exercise. Furthermore, NIRS indicates that after eccentric cycling muscle oxygen utilization and local oxygen transport at rest are unchanged. It is concluded that eccentric cycling, although causing DOMS, does not negatively affect skeletal muscle oxidative function.

  • 3. Wang, Li
    et al.
    Psilander, Niklas
    Tonkonogi, Michail
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    Ding, Shuzhe
    Sahlin, Kent
    Similar expression of oxidative genes after interval and continuous exercise2009In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 41, no 12, p. 2136-2144Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: There is a debate whether interval or traditional endurance training is the most effective stimulus of mitochondrial biogenesis. Here, we compared the effects of acute interval exercise (IE) or continuous exercise (CE) on the muscle messenger RNA (mRNA) content for several genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid metabolism.

    Methods: Nine sedentary subjects cycled for 90 min with two protocols: CE (at 67% V?O2max) and IE (12 s at 120% and 18 s at 20% of V?O2max). The duration of exercise and work performed with CE and IE was identical. Muscle biopsies were taken before and 3 h after exercise. Results: There were no significant differences between the two exercise protocols in the increases in V?O2 and HR, the reduction in muscle glycogen (35%-40% with both protocols) or the changes in blood metabolites (lactate, glucose, and fatty acids). The mRNA content for major regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) ? coactivator 1a (PGC-1a), PGC-1-related coactivator, PPAR/d] and of lipid metabolism [pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase isozyme 4 (PDK4)] increased after exercise, but there was no significant difference between IE and CE. However, the mRNA content for several downstream targets of PGC-1a increased significantly only after CE, and mRNA content for nuclear respiratory factor 2 was significantly higher after CE (P < 0.025 vs IE).

    Conclusions: The present findings demonstrate that, when the duration of exercise and work performed is the same, IE and CE influence the transcription of genes involved in oxidative metabolism in a similar manner.

  • 4.
    Westergren, Jens
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    Tonkonogi, Michail
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sport and Health Science.
    No difference in sprint cycling performance tests on a stationary and mobile ergometer2011In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, ISSN 0195-9131, E-ISSN 1530-0315, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 161-161Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 4 of 4
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