du.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Estampador, Angela C.
    et al.
    Pomeroy, Jeremy
    Renstrom, Frida
    Nelson, Scott M.
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Persson, Margareta
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Sattar, Naveed
    Domellof, Magnus
    Franks, Paul W.
    Infant body composition and adipokine concentrations in relation to maternal gestational weight gain2014In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 37, no 5, p. 1432-1438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate associations of maternal gestational weight gain and body composition and their impact on offspring body composition and adipocytokine, glucose, and insulin concentrations at age 4 months.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS. This was a prospective study including 31 mother-infant pairs (N = 62). Maternal body composition was assessed using doubly labeled water. Infant body composition was assessed at 4 months using air displacement plethysmography, and venous blood was assayed for glucose, insulin, adiponectin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and leptin concentrations.

    RESULTS. Rate of gestational weight gain in midpregnancy was significantly associated with infant fat mass (r = 0.41, P = 0.03); rate of gestational weight in late pregnancy was significantly associated with infant fat-free mass (r = 0.37, P = 0.04). Infant birth weight was also strongly correlated with infant fat-free mass at 4 months (r = 0.63, P = 0.0002). Maternal BMI and maternal fat mass were strongly inversely associated with infant IL-6 concentrations (r = -0.60, P = 0.002 and r = -0.52, P = 0.01, respectively). Infant fat-free mass was inversely related to infant adiponectin concentrations (r = -0.48, P = 0.008) and positively correlated with infant blood glucose adjusted for insulin concentrations (r = 0.42, P = 0.04). No significant associations for leptin were observed.

    CONCLUSIONS. Timing of maternal weight gain differentially impacts body composition of the 4-month-old infant, which in turn appears to affect the infant's glucose and adipokine concentrations.

  • 2.
    Jobs, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Risérus, Ulf
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Sundström, Johan
    Jobs, Magnus
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Nerpin, Elisabet
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Iggman, David
    Basu, Samar
    Larsson, Anders
    Lind, Lars
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Serum cathepsin S is associated with decreased insulin sensitivity and the development of diabetes type 2 in a community-based cohort of elderly men2012In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 163-165Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate associations between serum cathepsin S, impaired insulin sensitivity, defective insulin secretion, and diabetes risk in a community-based sample of elderly men without diabetes.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS. Serum cathepsin S, insulin sensitivity (euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp), and insulin secretion (early insulin response during an oral glucose tolerance test) were measured in 905 participants of the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (mean age, 71 years). Thirty participants developed diabetes during 6 years of follow-up.

    RESULTS. After adjustment for age, anthropometric variables, and inflammatory markers, higher cathepsin S was associated with decreased insulin sensitivity (regression coefficient per SD increase -0.09 [95% CI -0.14 to -0.04], P = 0.001), but no association with early insulin response was found. Moreover, higher cathepsin S was associated with a higher risk for developing diabetes (odds ratio per SD increase 1.48 [1.08-2.01], P = 0.01).

    CONCLUSIONS. Cathepsin S activity appears to be involved in the early dysregulation of glucose and insulin metabolism.

  • 3.
    Nerpin, Elisabet
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Risérus, U
    Ingelsson, E
    Sundström, J
    Jobs, Magnus
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Larsson, A
    Basu, S
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Insulin sensitivity, measured with euglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamp is independently associated with glomerular filtration rate in elderly men2008In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 31, no 8, p. 1550-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the association between insulin sensitivity and glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in the community, with prespecified subgroup analyses in normoglycemic individuals with normal GFR. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—We investigated the cross-sectional association between insulin sensitivity (M/I, assessed using euglycemic clamp) and cystatin C–based GFR in a community-based cohort of elderly men (Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men [ULSAM], n = 1,070). We also investigated whether insulin sensitivity predicted the incidence of renal dysfunction at a follow-up examination after 7 years. RESULTS—Insulin sensitivity was directly related to GFR (multivariable-adjusted regression coefficient for 1-unit higher M/I 1.19 [95% CI 0.69–1.68]; P < 0.001) after adjusting for age, glucometabolic variables (fasting plasma glucose, fasting plasma insulin, and 2-h glucose after an oral glucose tolerance test), cardiovascular risk factors (hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking), and lifestyle factors (BMI, physical activity, and consumption of tea, coffee, and alcohol). The positive multivariable-adjusted association between insulin sensitivity and GFR also remained statistically significant in participants with normal fasting plasma glucose, normal glucose tolerance, and normal GFR (n = 443; P < 0.02). In longitudinal analyses, higher insulin sensitivity at baseline was associated with lower risk of impaired renal function (GFR <50 ml/min per 1.73 m2) during follow-up independently of glucometabolic variables (multivariable-adjusted odds ratio for 1-unit higher of M/I 0.58 [95% CI 0.40–0.84]; P < 0.004). CONCLUSIONS—Our data suggest that impaired insulin sensitivity may be involved in the development of renal dysfunction at an early stage, before the onset of diabetes or prediabetic glucose elevations. Further studies are needed in order to establish causality.

  • 4. Pomeroy, Jeremy
    et al.
    Renström, Frida
    Gradmark, Anna M
    Mogren, Ingrid
    Persson, Margareta
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Bluck, Les
    Wright, Antony
    Kahn, Steven E
    Domellöf, Magnus
    Franks, Paul W
    Maternal physical activity and insulin action in pregnancy and their relationships with infant body composition2013In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 267-269Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE We sought to assess the association between maternal gestational physical activity and insulin action and body composition in early infancy.

    RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS At 28-32 weeks, gestation, pregnant women participating in an observational study in Sweden underwent assessments of height, weight, and body composition, an oral glucose tolerance test, and 10 days of objective physical activity assessment. Thirty mothers and infants returned at 11-19 weeks, postpartum. Infants underwent assessments of weight, length, and body composition.

    RESULTS Early insulin response was correlated with total physical activity (r = -0.47; P = 0.007). Early insulin response (r = -0.36; P = 0.045) and total physical activity (r = 0.52; P = 0.037) were also correlated with infant fat-free mass. No maternal variable was significantly correlated with infant adiposity.

    CONCLUSIONS The relationships between maternal physical activity, insulin response, and infant fat-free mass suggest that physical activity during pregnancy may affect metabolic outcomes in the mother and her offspring.

  • 5.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Sundström, J
    Ingelsson, E
    Lind, L
    The impact of body mass index and the metabolic syndrome on the risk of diabetes in middle-aged men2011In: Diabetes Care, ISSN 0149-5992, E-ISSN 1935-5548, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 61-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The existence of an obese subgroup with a healthy metabolic profile and low diabetes risk has been proposed; yet long-term data are lacking. We aimed to investigate associations between combinations of BMI categories and metabolic syndrome and risk of type 2 diabetes in middle-aged men.

    Research design and methods: At age 50, cardiovascular risk factors were assessed in 1,675 participants without diabetes in the community-based Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men (ULSAM) study. According to BMI/metabolic syndrome status, they were categorized as normal weight (BMI <25 kg/m2) without metabolic syndrome (National Cholesterol Education Program criteria, n = 853), normal weight with metabolic syndrome (n = 60), overweight (BMI 25–30 kg/m2) without metabolic syndrome (n = 557), overweight with metabolic syndrome (n = 117), obese (BMI >30 kg/m2) without metabolic syndrome (n = 28), and obese with metabolic syndrome (n = 60). We investigated the associations between BMI/metabolic syndrome categories at baseline and diabetes incidence.

    Results: After 20 years, 160 participants had developed diabetes. In logistic regression models adjusting for age, smoking, and physical activity, increased risks for diabetes were observed in the normal weight with metabolic syndrome (odds ratio 3.28 [95% CI] 1.38–7.81; P = 0.007), overweight without metabolic syndrome (3.49 [2.26–5.42]; P < 0.001), overweight with metabolic syndrome (7.77 [4.44–13.62]; P < 0.001), obese without metabolic syndrome (11.72 [4.88–28.16]; P < 0.001), and obese with metabolic syndrome (10.06 [5.19–19.51]; P < 0.001) categories compared with the normal weight without metabolic syndrome category.

    Conclusions: Overweight or obese men without metabolic syndrome were at increased risk for diabetes. Our data provide further evidence that overweight and obesity in the absence of the metabolic syndrome should not be considered a harmless condition.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf