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  • 1.
    Carstensen, Gunilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sociology.
    Rosberg, Birgitta
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Before evening falls: Perspectives of a good old age and healthy ageing among oldest-old Swedish men2019In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 82, p. 35-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The late life experiences of men in the oldest-old age group have been under-researched, and their perspectives on ageing successfully neglected. This study explored the perspectives of oldest-old Swedish men on what a ‘good old age’ and ageing successfully meant to them. A purposive sample of 17 men, aged 85-90 years, was drawn from the Uppsala Longitudinal Study of Adult Men. An interview guide explored participants’ perspectives on their ageing experiences and how they viewed ageing successfully. Participants were interviewed twice, with 1–2 weeks between interviews, and both interviews were recorded and transcribed. Content analysis identified four themes: i) Adaptation, concerning the ability to adapt to growing old with increasing limitations; ii) Sustaining Independence, related to financial resources and good health as the foundation for independence; iii) Belongingness, representing close relationships, established friendships, and the significance of the spouse; and iv) Perspectives of Time, also a common thread in all themes, in which past life experiences create an existential link between the past, the present and the future, establishing continuity of the self and enhancing life satisfaction. The participants presented themselves as active agents involved in maintaining meaning and achieving life satisfaction; a process related to the ability to manage changes in life. Our findings have resonance with models of healthy or successful ageing, but also diverge in important ways, since such models do not consider the significance of an individual’s life history for their present well-being, and primarily conceptualise health as an outcome, rather than as a resource.

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  • 2.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet.
    Agahi, Neda
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lonelier than ever?: Loneliness of older people over two decades2018In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 75, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To live with feelings of loneliness has negative implications for quality of life, health and survival. This study aimed to examine changes in loneliness among older people, both with regard to prevalence rates, and socio-demographic, social and health-related correlates of loneliness. This study had a repeated cross-sectional design and was based on the nationally representative Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD). Analyses of trends in loneliness covered the years 1992, 2002, 2004, 2011 and 2014, and included people aged 77 years or older (n=2 572). Analyses of correlates of loneliness covered 2004 and 2014, and included people aged 70 years or older (n=1 962). Logistic regression analyses were conducted with findings presented as average marginal effects. Contrary to what is often assumed, there has been no increase in loneliness among older people over time (1992-2014). Regression analyses for 2004 and 2014 showed that social and health-related correlates were more strongly associated with loneliness than socio-demographic correlates. Psychological distress was most strongly associated with loneliness, followed by widowhood. Most associations between the correlates and loneliness were stable over time.

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  • 3.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Social exclusion and well-being among older adults in rural and urban areas2018In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 79, p. 176-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social exclusion (SE) is a process that limits participation in society across life domains, and is associated with poor quality of life. Neighbourhood exclusion has been identified as particularly important for older adults. This paper examines the association between SE and well-being in older adults from urban and rural areas, focusing on neighbourhood exclusion.

    Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey design with a stratified sampling frame, participants (aged 65+) from rural (n=628) and urban (n=627) areas of Barnsley, United Kingdom, completed a questionnaire containing indicators of five SE domains: civic activity, material resources, social relationships, services and neighbourhood. Sequential linear regression models were developed for 1) total sample; 2) rural areas; and 3) urban areas, with well-being regressed on SE indicators after controlling for self-reported health.

    Results: SE indicators explained 13.4% of the variance in well-being in the total sample (of which neighbourhood exclusion explained 1.2%); corresponding figures for the rural model were 13.8% (3.8%) and for the urban model 18.0% (1.7%); the addition of neighbourhood exclusion significantly improved all three models.  Five SE indicators were significant in the rural model, compared with seven in the urban model, with four common to both.

    Discussion: Neighbourhood exclusion explained more variance in well-being in rural than urban areas, whereas exclusion from services explained more variance in urban than rural areas. Area characteristics and the role of neighbourhood should be considered in policy initiatives to reduce SE and promote well-being.

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  • 4.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm University.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Fritzell, J.
    Heap, J.
    Lennartsson, C.
    Trends and gender associations in social exclusion in older adults in Sweden over two decades2020In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 89, article id 104032Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 5. Kabir, Z
    et al.
    Tischelman, C
    Aguero-Torres, H
    Chowdury, AMR
    Höjer, Bengt
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Gender and rural-urban differences in reported health status by older people in Bangladesh2003In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, no 37, p. 77-91Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Naseer, Mahwish
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet; Stockholm University.
    Agerholm, Janne
    Fastbom, Johan
    Schön, Pär
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet; Stockholm University.
    Factors associated with emergency department revisits among older adults in two Swedish regions: A prospective cohort study2020In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 86, article id 103960Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To assess the association between baseline characteristics at an index ED visit and ED revisit within 30 days among adults aged ≥ 65 years in two Swedish regions.

    Methods

    This was a register-based prospective cohort study. The sample included (N=16 688; N=101 017) older adults who have had an index ED visit in 2014 at hospital based EDs in the regions of Dalarna and Stockholm, Sweden. Several registers were linked to obtain information on sociodemographic factors, living conditions, social care, polypharmacy and health care use. Multivariate logistic regression was used to analyse the data.

    Results

    Seventeen percent of the study sample in Dalarna and 20.1% in Stockholm revisited ED within 30 days after an index ED visit. In both regions, male gender, being in the last year of life, excessive polypharmacy (≥ 10 drugs), ≥11 primary care visits and ED care utilization were positively associated with ED revisits. In Stockholm, but not in Dalarna, low level of education, polypharmacy, and institutional care was also associated with ED revisits. In contrast, home help was associated with ED revisits in Dalarna but not in Stockholm.

    Conclusion

    These findings call for further in-depth examinations of variations within single countries. ED revisits among older adults are driven by need of care but also by the social and care situation.

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  • 7.
    Naseer, Mahwish
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet.
    Agerholm, Janne
    Fastbom, Johan
    Schön, Pär
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet.
    Factors associated with emergency department revisits among older adults in two Swedish regions: A prospective cohort study2020In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 86, article id 103960Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Örebro universitet.
    Inpatient geriatric care in Sweden: Important factors from an inter-disciplinary team perspective2017In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 172, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe factors of importance for the quality of inpatient geriatric care from an inter-disciplinary team perspective, an area that has not been previously studied to our knowledge. The study design was qualitative descriptive with data being collected from focus-group interviews with members of geriatric care teams. The data collection was conducted at a Swedish university hospital with 69 beds for geriatric care. It comprised five group interviews with a total of 32 staff members, including representatives of all the seven professions working with geriatric care. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis and a thematic framework approach. Three main themes were identified as being perceived as characterising important factors essential for quality geriatric care:

    • Interactive assessment processes,
    • A holistic care approach, and
    • Proactive non-hierarchical interaction

    Aspects of time and goal-orientation were additionally running like common threads through these themes and informed them. Accessibility, open communication, and staff continuity were experienced as prerequisites for well-functioning teamwork. Including patients and relatives in care planning and implementation was seen as essential for good care, but was at risk due to budget cuts that imposed shortened hospital stays. To meet the care demands of the growing population of older frail people, more specialised team-based care according to the concept of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment – which is possibly best provided by older-friendly hospitals – appears as a constructive solution for reaching high degrees of both staff and patient satisfaction in geriatric care. More research is needed in this area.

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1 - 8 of 8
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