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  • 1.
    Palstam, Annie
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Westerlind, Emma
    Persson, Hanna C
    Sunnerhagen, Katharina S
    Work-related predictors for return to work after stroke.2019In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 139, no 4, p. 382-388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Disability due to stroke imposes a large burden on individuals, and on society, in terms of impaired work ability and sick leave. The reported return to work (RTW) rate after stroke varies globally and is influenced by a range of different aspects. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of work-related factors on time to RTW after stroke, and possible differences between the sexes.

    MATERIALS & METHODS: Data from 204 persons with first-time stroke in the years 2009-2010 in Gothenburg, Sweden, who were of working age and had worked prior to their stroke, were analysed. Disease-related characteristics were retrieved from medical records, and work-related- and socio-economic data were collected up to 6 years post-stroke from Statistics Sweden and the Swedish Social Insurance Agency. Cox regression was used to analyse predictors for time to RTW.

    RESULTS: We identified qualified occupation and large organizational size as work-related predictors for shorter time to RTW after stroke. Being male predicted a faster and higher frequency of RTW. Qualified occupation predicted shorter time to RTW in men but not in women. For women, the only predictor for RTW was physical dependency at discharge.

    CONCLUSION: Type of work and organizational size are work-related factors of importance for RTW after stroke. Work-related factors were important for RTW in men, but not in women. Reasons for differences between men and women in work-related factors that influence RTW need to be further investigated to better understand how to support women in the RTW process.

  • 2.
    Thomas, Ilias
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Microdata Analysis.
    Memedi, Mevludin
    Westin, Jerker
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Computer Engineering.
    Nyholm, Dag
    The effect of continuous levodopa treatment during the afternoon hours2019In: Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-6314, E-ISSN 1600-0404, Vol. 139, no 1, p. 70-75Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate if patients with PD, who are treated with levodopa-carbidopa intestinal gel (LCIG), clinically worsen during the afternoon hours and if so, to evaluate whether this occurs in all LCIG-treated patients or in a sub-group of patients.

    METHODS: Three published studies were identified and included in the analysis. All studies provided individual response data assessed on the treatment response scale (TRS) and patients were treated with continuous LCIG. Ninety-eight patients from the three studies fulfilled the criteria. T-tests were performed to find differences on the TRS values between the morning and the afternoon hours, linear mixed effect models were fitted on the afternoon hours' evaluations to find trends of wearing-off, and patients were classified into three TRS categories (meaningful increase in TRS, meaningful decrease in TRS, non -meaningful increase or decrease).

    RESULTS: In all three studies significant statistical differences were found between the morning TRS values and the afternoon TRS values (p-value <= 0.001 in all studies). The linear mixed effect models had significant negative coefficients for time in two studies, and 48 out of 98 patients (49%) showed a meaningful decrease of TRS during the afternoon hours.

    CONCLUSION: The results from all studies were consistent, both in the proportion of patients in the three groups and the value of TRS decrease in the afternoon hours. Based on these findings there seems to be a group of patients with predictable "off" behavior in the later parts of the day. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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