Dalarna University's logo and link to the university's website

du.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Canales Carballido, Gloria Fatima
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Can an intervention increase access to higher education for disadvantaged students?: Quasi-experimental evidence from Peru2023Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Heterogeneity in the school education quality plays an important role for those who want to pursue a bachelor's degree in Peru since access to higher education is highly correlated with socioeconomic status. In that sense, an intervention for disadvantaged students took place for the first time in 2022 and was constrained to the assessment of a scholarship called “Beca 18”, the biggest scholarship that the public institution called PRONABEC addresses every year since 2012. The intervention included additional tools for a group of applicants: (i) full-time online classes for 2 to 4 months; (ii) an electronic device with an internet connection; and (iii) the admission exam payment fully covered up to 2 times. The objective of this thesis is to evaluate the effectiveness of this intervention in increasing the likelihood of the treated to access higher education through the 2022 “Beca 18” scholarship process. As the treatment was not randomly assigned, a control group was estimated using the Propensity Score Matching methodology based on individual characteristics. Results showed that there is no statistically significant effect of the intervention in the treated applicants and invite to re-evaluate its design and implementation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 2.
    Chala, Alemu Tulu
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    The Impact of Lending Relationships on the Lead Arrangers’ Retained Share2023In: International Journal of Financial Studies, E-ISSN 2227-7072, Vol. 11, no 4, article id 119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 3.
    Cialani, Catia
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Mortazavi, Reza
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Sectoral analysis of club convergence in EU countries’ CO2 emissions2021In: Energy, ISSN 0360-5442, Vol. 235, p. 1-10, article id 121332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper examines convergence clubs for per capita CO2 emissions among 28 European countries intwo main activity sectors (Industry and Manufacturing) between 1970 and 2018, with a focus on theenergy sector. The method used is the Phillips-Sul log t-test using two ordering criteria to run the algorithmfor the panel countries. The first one is using the last observation and the second one uses thesample average. The results of analyses of data strongly support the existence of convergence clubs,indicating that five groups of European countries are converging to distinct steady states for theaggregate CO2 emissions. We also find evidence of convergence clubs for industry sectors whilemanufacturing sector shows clubs convergence only when we use the first criterion while in the secondcase, we find only a single steady state.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4. Coad, A.
    et al.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. Institute of Retail Economics, Stockholm.
    Halvarsson, D.
    Amundsen versus Scott: are growth paths related to firm performance?2021In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. Institute of Retail Economics, Stockholm.
    Gidehag, A.
    Rudholm, N.
    How Do Firms Respond to Reduced Labor Costs?: Evidence from the 2007 Swedish Payroll Tax Reform2021In: Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, ISSN 1566-1679, E-ISSN 1573-7012, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 315-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. Inst Retail Econ HFI, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Mihaescu, Oana
    Inst Retail Econ HFI, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Oner, Ozge
    Univ Cambridge / Res Inst Ind Econ IFN, Stockholm, Sweden / Jonkoping Int Business School.
    Rudholm, Niklas
    Inst Retail Econ HFI, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Retail and Place Attractiveness: The Effects of Big-Box Entry on Property Values2021In: Geographical Analysis, ISSN 0016-7363, E-ISSN 1538-4632, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 467-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The opponents of big-box entry argue that large retail establishments generate a variety of negative externalities. The advocates, on the contrary, argue that access to a large retail market not only delivers direct economic benefits, but also a variety of positive spill-over effects, and therefore, can be considered a consumer amenity that increases the attractiveness of the entry location. To test the validity of these competing arguments, we use the entry of IKEA in Sweden as a quasi-experiment and investigate if increased access to retail is associated with place attractiveness, where attractiveness is proxied by residential property values. We find that entry by IKEA increases prices of the properties sold in the entry cities by, on average, 4.2% or 62,980 SEK (approximately 6,600 USD), but such an effect is statistically insignificant for the properties in the immediate vicinity of the new IKEA retail trade area. We also observe an attenuation of the effect with distance from the new IKEA store, where the properties located 10 km away experience a 2% price increase. Our results indicate that large retailers have the potential to increase place attractiveness, but perhaps not in the immediate vicinity of the new establishment.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 7. Denver, Sigrid
    et al.
    Christensen, Tove
    Nordström, Jonas
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. Department of Food and Resource Economics, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Consumer preferences for low-salt foods - a Danish case study based on a comprehensive supermarket intervention.2021In: Public Health Nutrition, ISSN 1368-9800, E-ISSN 1475-2727, Vol. 24, no 12, p. 3956-3965, article id PII S1368980021002056Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: The objective is to analyze Danish consumers' attitudes to buying food with reduced salt content.

    DESIGN: The study is based on a comprehensive store intervention that included 114 stores belonging to the same supermarket chain. Three different salt claims were tested for eight weeks on six test products within the categories bread, cornflakes and frozen pizzas. Scanner data were supplemented with 134 brief interviews with consumers in nine selected stores.

    SETTING: Stores spread across Denmark.

    PARTICIPANTS: Consumers who buy food in the stores.

    RESULTS: Statistical regression analyses of the scanner data indicated that none of the three claims significantly affected demand for any of the test products. The interviews confirmed that many consumers were more focused on other elements of the official dietary advice than reduced salt consumption, such as eating plenty of vegetables, choosing products with whole grains and reducing their intake of sugar and fat.

    CONCLUSIONS: Overall, both the scanner data and the interviews pointed in the same direction, toward the conclusion that salt content is often a secondary factor when Danish consumers make dietary choices.

  • 8. Denver, Sigrid
    et al.
    Christensen, Tove
    Nordström, Jonas
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. University of Copenhagen; Lund University.
    Ditlevsen, Kia
    Jensen, Jørgen Dejgård
    Sandøe, Peter
    Dietary priorities and consumers’ views of the healthiness of organic food: purity or flexibility?2022In: Organic Agriculture, ISSN 1879-4238, E-ISSN 1879-4246, Vol. 12, p. 165-173Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that belief in the healthiness of organic food is a strong motive for buying organic. Typically, a positive relation between a nutritionally balanced diet (with respect to fruit, vegetables and meat) and organic consumption is also found. As market shares of organic food are much smaller than those of conventional food, consumers may face a trade-off between buying organic and choosing the nutritional composition they prefer. Using data from a survey of around 1300 Danish consumers, we found that almost all respondents believed that organic food contains fewer unwanted substances than non-organic food, and that around a third considered organic food to be nutritionally superior. Respondents with high organic consumption and who believe in the nutritious superiority of organic food products were more likely to belong to a small group of respondents who prioritized buying organic. However, the vast majority, particularly those with low levels of organic consumption, prioritized dietary flexibility over organic produce. Our findings suggest that to motivate those in this large consumer segment to increase their organic consumption, it will be necessary to offer a broader, more nutritionally differentiated, range of organic products. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature B.V.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 9. Denver, Sigrid
    et al.
    Nordström, Jonas
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Christensen, Tove
    Plant-based food – Purchasing intentions, barriers and drivers among different organic consumer groups in Denmark2023In: Journal of Cleaner Production, ISSN 0959-6526, E-ISSN 1879-1786, Vol. 419, article id 138256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How do we design policies that support a shift in eating habits towards a diet that includes more vegetable-basedproducts and less meat, and in particular red meat? To inform policy, more information is needed about consumers’perceptions of the plant-based protein alternatives that have become available on the market. Thepresent study of 1000 Danish consumers examined oat drink and plant-based mince as substitutes for cows’ milkand minced beef. While the popularity of these is increasing, in 2021 70% of Danish consumers had nonethelessnever tried using oat drink or plant-based mince. Respondents who stated that they often bought organic foodwere more likely to associate the plant-based products with benefits as well as being more likely to have triedusing the plant-based products. While plant-based products were associated mainly with public good characteristics,it was private good characteristics that explained consumption of the products. Therefore, improvingtaste – or changing people’s expectations about it – and reducing price are ways to reduce barriers to consumption.Initiatives to improve public understanding of the ways in which plant-based and animal-basedproducts differ are also important, as many respondents were somewhat unclear about which characteristicsthey associated with the two products.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 10. Edenbrandt, A. K.
    et al.
    Lagerkvist, C. J.
    Nordström, Jonas
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. Lund University; University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Interested, indifferent or active information avoiders of carbon labels: Cognitive dissonance and ascription of responsibility as motivating factors2021In: Food Policy, ISSN 0306-9192, E-ISSN 1873-5657, Vol. 101, article id 102036Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 11. Edenbrandt, A. K.
    et al.
    Nordström, Jonas
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala; Lund University.
    The future of carbon labeling - Factors to consider2023In: Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, ISSN 1068-2805, Vol. 12, no 120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Compared to other policy instruments that aim to change consumer behavior, information provision is perhaps the least controversial. An important question is how information in the form of carbon labels can contribute to direct food consumption toward reduced climate impact. From a policy guidance perspective, there is a need to identify how the labeling strategy affects consumers' ability to identify lower emitting food products and the behavioral change due to carbon information. Key aspects of a carbon label are discussed, as well as the implications of different labeling schemes. Drawing on economic and behavioral theories, we propose that, to assist consumers in identifying changes in consumption that contribute to significant reductions in their climate impact, a carbon label must enable comparisons between product groups and not only within narrowly defined product groups. This suggests mandatory labeling, since producers of high-emission products are less likely to display such labels. However, it is important to consider both costs and benefits of labeling schemes and to consider complementing labeling with other policy instruments. © The Author(s), 2023. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of the Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Gezelius, Mats
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Mortazavi, Reza
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Effect of Having Solar Panels on the Probability of Owning Battery Electric Vehicle2022In: World Electric Vehicle Journal, E-ISSN 2032-6653, Vol. 13, no 7, article id 125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Greenhouse gas emissions, produced by various sectors, including transportation, are significantly impairing the environment and drive climate change. Battery electric vehicles are increasingly seen as a way to alleviate these problems, but they must be charged with electricity produced through environmentally friendly methods. This paper investigates a possible relationship between battery electric vehicles and solar photovoltaic panels using ENABLE.EU household survey data from ten European countries in autumn 2017–spring 2018. Based on the estimates from a recursive bivariate probit model, it is found that the probability that a household owns a battery electric vehicle increases significantly if said household owns solar photovoltaic panels. This suggests that a policy encouraging the home charging of battery electric vehicles using solar photovoltaic panels that includes an energy storage facility could speed up the transition to the use of these vehicles.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 13.
    Hammarlund, Cecilia
    et al.
    AgriFood Economics Centre, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Andersson, Anna
    Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lund, Sweden.
    Nordström, Jonas
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. AgriFood Economics Centre, Lund University, Lund, Sweden;Department of Business, Economics and Law, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Nutrient policies and the performance of aquaculture in developed countries: a literature review2024In: Aquaculture Economics & Management, ISSN 1365-7305, E-ISSN 1551-8663, p. 1-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Eutrophication is  a  serious problem in  many parts of  the world, and aquaculture production can  contribute to  the problem as  well  as  be  part  of  its  solution. Nutrient polices in developed countries are  often command-and-control policies that  may  have contributed to  the  slow growth of  the  sector. We  perform a  literature review to  investigate how current nutrient polices affect the  sector and  if  economic incentive policies have greater potential to  support sector growth. Although the  literature is  limited in  many aspects, the  results indicate that  this  may be  the  case. Given that  the  ability to measure, monitor and  control has  improved over time, possi-bilities for  using economic incentive policies have increased. For  example, subsidies that  are  results-based, i.e.,  based on the amount of emissions that are reduced, could be used. It is also possible for aquaculture production to benefit from being included in  emissions trading systems, where these are available.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    Huq, Asif M
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Information and Engineering, Microdata Analysis.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. Institute of Retail Economics, Stockholm.
    Hartwig, Fredrik
    University of Gävle.
    Rudholm, Niklas
    Institute of Retail Economics, Stockholm.
    Free to Choose: Do Voluntary Audit Reforms Increase Employment Growth?2021In: International Journal of the Economics of Business, ISSN 1357-1516, E-ISSN 1466-1829, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 163-178Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Jussila Hammes, Johanna
    et al.
    VTI, Statens väg- och transportforskningsinstitut.
    Nerhagen, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Ex ante eller ex post – när bör Sverige bedöma EU-lagstiftningens konsekvenser?2023In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 39-51Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi föreslår en förbättrad process för arbetet med EU-lagstiftning i Sverige, baserad på exempel från Danmark och Finland. Sverige gör i bästa fall kon­sekvensanalyser när lagstiftningsprocessen har kommit till fasen för nationell implementering. EU:s lagstiftningsprocess börjar dock redan när rykten börjar cirkulera om att kommissionen ska föreslå ny reglering. I nästa fas får medlems­länderna mer information om kommissionens planer i form av kommissionens arbetsprogram, en färdplan, eller en grön- eller vitbok. Senast i detta skede bör en ex ante nuläges- och konsekvensanalys göras enligt finsk modell. Effektivare ex post-implementering kan stödjas av införandet av ett implementeringsråd enligt dansk modell.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Jussila Hammes, Johanna
    et al.
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Nerhagen, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Congdon Fors, Heather
    Gothenburg University.
    The Influence of Individual Charactersitics and Institutional Norms on Bureaucrats’ Use of Cost–Benefit Analysis: A Choice Experiment2021In: Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, ISSN 2194-5888, E-ISSN 2152-2812, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 258-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A commonly assumed reason for the delegation of authority from a legislature (politicians) to bureaucracies is that the bureaucrats have an information advantage over the politicians, including knowledge of cost–benefit analysis (CBA). But it is reasonable to assume that the bureaucrats use their information advantage by taking all relevant aspects of policy into account? We model the use of CBA using a delegation model and then test the theoretical predictions with empirical data collected from five Swedish government agencies. The empirical results lend support both for the hypothesis that risk aversion concerning the environmental outcome, the bureaucrats’ environmental attitudes, and the cost of taking CBA information into account have a considerable impact on the probability of using information from a CBA. Hence risk averse and bureaucrats with strong environmental preferences are less likely and bureaucrats with low cost of doing a CBA more likely than other bureaucrats to use CBA information. Finally, a binding governmental budget constraint may positively influence a bureaucrat’s choice of using CBA information. A tentative conclusion is therefore that it may be possible to increase the use of CBA by making the budgetary consequences of policies much clearer and demanding due consideration of costs.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Lindgren, Charlie
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Information and Engineering, Microdata Analysis.
    Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. Institute of Retail Economics, Stockholm.
    Rudholm, N.
    Yella, Siril
    Dalarna University, School of Information and Engineering, Computer Engineering.
    Is intertemporal price discrimination the cause of price dispersion in markets with low search costs?2021In: Applied Economics Letters, ISSN 1350-4851, E-ISSN 1466-4291, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 968-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18.
    Malek, Wasim
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Information and Engineering, Microdata Analysis.
    Mortazavi, Reza
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Cialani, Catia
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Nordström, Jonas
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    How have waste management policies impacted the flow of municipal waste? An empirical analysis of 14 European countries2023In: Waste Management, ISSN 0956-053X, E-ISSN 1879-2456, Vol. 164, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Waste management policies aim to divert waste from lower positions on the waste hierarchy such as landfill and incineration to higher positions in the hierarchy such as energy recovery and recycling. However, empirical evaluations of such policies are scarce. This study highlighted the effect of waste management policies on the amount of waste treated with landfill, incineration, energy recovery and recycling by analysing a panel dataset consisting of 14 European countries and the period 1996 to 2018. Findings from a seemingly unrelated regression model suggest that the landfill ban is associated with a decrease in landfill waste, but an increase in incineration, energy recovery and recycling waste. The landfill tax is also correlated with an increase in energy recovery waste but, in contrast, it is associated with a reduction in incineration and recycling waste. Meanwhile, the deposit refund scheme is associated with a decrease in the amount of landfill waste. Concerning the effects on total waste generated, regression results from a fixed effects model indicate that the landfill tax and the deposit refund scheme are both correlated with a reduction in the amount of waste generated. These findings contribute to the scarce academic literature evaluating waste management policies and may better inform policy makers on their longer-term implications.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19.
    Mortazavi, Reza
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    The relationship between visitor satisfaction, expectation and spending in a sport event2021In: European Research on Management and Business Economics, ISSN 2444-8834, Vol. 27, no 1, article id 100132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 20. Mottaghi, M.
    et al.
    Nordström, Jonas
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. Lund University; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lund.
    Haghighatafshar, S.
    Jönsson, K.
    Kärrholm, M.
    Sternudd, C.
    Correction to: Caring for Blue-Green Solutions (BGS) in Everyday Life: An Investigation of Recreational Use, Neighborhood Preferences and Willingness to Pay in Augustenborg, Malmö (Land, (2023), 12, 2, (336), 10.3390/land12020336)2023In: Land, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 12, no 7, article id 1449Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There was an error in the original publication [1]. “Building awareness about BGS seems to increase the willingness to pay, whereas recreational use seems to decrease it.” A correction has been made to Abstract, lines 10–11 of the paragraph: In addition, recreational use and building awareness about BGS flood mitigation seem to increase the willingness to pay, whereas living longer in the area seems to decrease it. There was an error in the original publication [1]. “Furthermore, learning about BGS seems to increase the willingness to pay for it, whereas caring to use it seems to decrease the willingness to pay for it.” A correction (the same as in the Abstract) has been made to Conclusions, lines 8–9 of the paragraph 3: Furthermore, recreational use and building awareness about BGS flood mitigation seem to increase the willingness to pay, whereas living longer in the area seems to decrease it. The authors state that the scientific conclusions are unaffected. This correction was approved by the Academic Editor. The original publication has also been updated. © 2023 by the authors.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Mottaghi, Misagh
    et al.
    Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden;Sweden Water Research AB, SE-223 70 Lund, Sweden.
    Nordström, Jonas
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. School of Economics and Management, Agrifood Economics Centre, Lund University, SE-220 07 Lund, Sweden;Department of Economics, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, SE-220 07 Lund, Sweden;Department of Business, Economics and Law, Dalarna University, SE-791 88 Falun, Sweden.
    Haghighatafshar, Salar
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Jönsson, Karin
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Water and Environmental Engineering, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Kärrholm, Mattias
    Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Sternudd, Catharina
    Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Lund University, SE-221 00 Lund, Sweden.
    Caring for Blue-Green Solutions (BGS) in Everyday Life: An Investigation of Recreational Use, Neighborhood Preferences and Willingness to Pay in Augustenborg, Malmö2023In: Land, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 12, no 2, article id 336Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we explore the production of socio-cultural values around blue-green solutions (BGS) through the perspective of care. We explore how values and preferences are formed through the complexity of everyday life engagements in a BGS environment. The data come from a questionnaire answered by 328 households in the neighborhood of Augustenborg in Malmö, Sweden. The questionnaire collects detailed information about inhabitants’ possible recreational use (through Likert scale questions) and willingness to pay (WTP) (estimated through contingent valuation). The study evaluates if and how people care to use, care to live with, and care to pay for BGS. The result shows that people in Augustenborg relate in different and sometimes contradictory ways to BGS. A well-used BGS environment does not per se make the environment successful or result in people preferring a BGS environment in the future. Building awareness about BGS seems to increase the willingness to pay, whereas recreational use seems to decrease it. The study reveals a landscape of care that is constantly being formed and transformed. This suggests that both planning and research needs to focus more on the relation between BGS and social use over time.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Nerhagen, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    A tale of an island – on changing circumstances and the need for adaptive governance2021In: Baltic Rim Economies, no 5Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Nerhagen, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Gränsvärden i lagstiftning– man måste veta vad, var och hur man ska mäta!2023In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 51, no 6, p. 52-56Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 24.
    Nerhagen, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Brandt, Daniel
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Human Geography.
    Mortazavi, Reza
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Use of public transport as a means to reach national climate objectives - On the importance of accounting for spatial differences and costs, Transport Policy2023In: Transport Policy, ISSN 0967-070X, E-ISSN 1879-310X, Vol. 131, p. 56-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden has since the end of the 1990s, when the environmental objective system was adopted, had the ambitionof being an environmental frontrunner. In line with this, in 2009 the Parliament adopted the goal of achieving afossil free vehicle fleet in 2030. Replacing private car use with public transport is expected to contribute to thisgoal. In 2008, a co-operation between actors in the public transport sector was launched with support from theGovernment with the aim to double its use. Sweden however is a country with important geographical differ-ences. Much of the country is sparsely populated, especially in the north. From previous research it is well knownthat usage of public transport is dependent on population density and accessibility to employment and schools.Understanding how spatial differences influence the cost of public transport provision is therefore crucial whendiscussing if public transport is a cost-efficient way to achieve national goals for the transport sector. In thispaper, Swedish county level panel data, including variables that provide information on geographical differencesbetween the counties, have been used to estimate average marginal costs of boardings. Results show that theseare much lower in the three counties with the largest urbanized areas. In the other counties there is a variationwhich illustrates that there are a number of factors that influence the average marginal costs. In relation to policy, we find that the doubling ambition established in 2008 has not been achieved.

  • 25.
    Nerhagen, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Jussila Hammes, Johanna
    Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute, Stockholm.
    Policy Diffusion, Environmental Federalism, and Economic Efficiency - How Institutions Influence the Implementation of EU Legislation in Two Nordic Countries2024In: Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, ISSN 2194-5888, E-ISSN 2152-2812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We explore the changes in central government administration due to European Union (EU) membership and its consequences for policy outcomes and economic efficiency in Finland and Sweden. Both countries became members of the EU in 1995. Upon joining the union, member states are expected to adopt common legislation and are encouraged to develop similar rule-making procedures. The actual implementation of EU directives varies considerably between member states, however. This is also the case for Finland and Sweden. Despite the two Nordic countries for historical reasons having had similar government systems, upon becoming members of the EU, they started to diverge. Using a model of delegation and comparing the more centralized Finnish system with the decentralized institutional setup in Sweden, we show that the Swedish approach leads to a stricter than optimal environmental policy, which in turn makes EU policy non-optimal from a global point of view, ceteris paribus. We also provide empirical support for our findings in the form of some example cases. We focus on environmental policy since this is an area that has been high on the EU agenda. © The Author(s), 2024. Published by Cambridge University Press on behalf of Society for Benefit-Cost Analysis.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Nerhagen, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Jussila Hammes, Johanna
    VTI, Swedish National Road and Transport Research Institute.
    Policy diffusion, environmental federalism and economic efficiency: how culture and institutions influence the implementation of EU legislation in two Nordic countries2023Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the changes in central government administration due to European Union (EU) membership and their consequences for policy outcomes and economic efficiency in Finland and Sweden. Both countries became members of the EU in 1995. Upon joining the union, member states are expected to adopt common legislation and encouraged to develop similar rule-making procedures. The actual implementation of EU directives varies considerably between member states, however. This is also the case for Finland and Sweden. Despite the two Nordic countries for historical reasons having had similar government systems, upon becoming members of the EU they started to diverge. Using a model of delegation and comparing the more centralized Finnish system with the decentralized institutional setup in Sweden, we show that the Swedish approach leads to stricter than optimal environmental policy, which in turn makes EU policy non-optimal from a global point of view, ceteris paribus. We also provide empirical support for our findings in the form of some example-cases. We focus on environmental policy since this is an area that has been high on the EU agenda.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 27.
    Nerhagen, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Jussila Hammes, Johanna
    VTI.
    Pyddoke, Roger
    VTI.
    Brist på samhällsekonomisk effektivitet i den svenska miljöpolitiken försvårar EU:s miljöarbete2021In: Ekonomisk Debatt, ISSN 0345-2646, Vol. 49, no 8, p. 28-38Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 28.
    Nordström, Jonas
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark; Lund University; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Lund, Sweden; n.
    Denver, Sigrid
    University of Copenhagen, Frederiksberg, Denmark.
    The impact of voluntary sustainability adjustments on greenhouse gas emissions from food consumption – The case of Denmark2024In: Cleaner and Responsible Consumption, ISSN 2666-7843, Vol. 12, article id 100164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study we ask how a range of environmental sustainability adjustments that consumers find it easy to adoptaffect the carbon footprint of their food consumption. The study is based on information about real purchases offood products and responses to a questionnaire about the various sustainability adjustments that the studyparticipants apply and their concern about climate change. Based on principal component and regressionanalysis the results from the study indicate that sustainability adjustments such as organic consumption, buyingdomestically produced food and eating seasonal produce, as well as concern about climate change, are associatedwith a reduced carbon footprint from food consumption. The largest reductions were found for organic consumers.The results suggested that most committed organic consumers have a carbon footprint that is about onethird smaller than that of consumers who seldom buy organic food products. The results also indicate that thesevoluntary sustainability adjustments are not sufficient to secure conformity with today’s goals for reducedgreenhouse gas emissions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Nordström, Jonas
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Hammarlund, Cecilia
    You Win Some, You Lose Some: Compensating the Loss of Green Space in Cities Considering Heterogeneous Population Characteristics2021In: Land, E-ISSN 2073-445X, Vol. 10, no 11, p. 1156-1156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The increased urbanization and human population growth of the recent decades have resulted in the loss of urban green spaces. One policy used to prevent the loss of urban green space is ecological compensation. Ecological compensation is the final step in the mitigation hierarchy; compensation measures should thus be a last resort after all opportunities to implement the earlier steps of the hierarchy have been exhausted. Ecological compensation should balance the ecological damage, aiming for a “no net loss” of biodiversity and ecosystem services. In this study, we develop a simple model that can be used as tool to study the welfare effects of applying ecological compensation when green space is at risk of being exploited, both at an aggregate level for society and for different groups of individuals. Our focus is on urban green space and the value of the ecosystem service—recreation—that urban green space provides. In a case study, we show how the model can be used in the planning process to evaluate the welfare effects of compensation measures at various sites within the city. The results from the case study indicate that factors such as population density and proximity to green space have a large impact on aggregate welfare from green space and on net welfare when different compensation sites are compared against each other.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30. Saha, Sanjib
    et al.
    Nordström, Jonas
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics. Lund University; University of Copenhagen.
    Scarborough, Peter
    Thunström, Linda
    Gerdtham, Ulf-G
    In search of an appropriate mix of taxes and subsidies on nutrients and food: A modelling study of the effectiveness on health-related consumption and mortality.2021In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 287, article id 114388Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Taxes and subsidies on foods and nutrients have the potential to promote healthier diets and thereby reduce mortality. In this study, we examine the effects of such policy instruments on Swedish public health. Specifically, we estimate the effects of food and nutrient taxes and subsidies on mortality averted and postponed in Sweden, using both demand system estimations and simulation models. We evaluate different Value Added Tax (VAT) reforms. The VAT is raised on food products that are particularly rich in saturated fat or salt and lowered on fruit and vegetables. Our models predict that an increase in the current VAT of 12% on food, to 25% VAT on products rich in saturated fat plus a 0% VAT on fruits and vegetables would result in almost 1100 deaths (95% CI: -832; -1363) averted or postponed in a year in Sweden, while the combination of a 34.4% VAT on products rich in saturated fat and a -10.4% VAT (i.e. a subsidy) on fruits and vegetables would result in almost 2100 (95% CI: -1572; -2311) deaths averted or postponed corresponding to a 4.8% reduction in diet-related annual death. Most of the deaths averted or delayed from this reform would be deaths from coronary heart disease (-1,148, 95% CI: -728; -1586), followed by stroke -641 (95% CI: -408; -887) and diet-related cancer deaths (-288, 95% CI: -11; -435). We find that health-related food taxes and subsidies improve dietary habits as well as reduce the mortality of the Swedish population. However, the effect of these reforms on different socioeconomic classes and which reforms provide the best value for money, i.e., cost-effectiveness of these reforms needs to be established first before implementation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 31.
    Sörling, Andreas
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Economics.
    Are renewable sources displacing fossil fuels in electricity generation?: A panel data investigation on global data2023Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As the consequences of climate change is increasing the need of replacing fossil fuels with renewable energy globally is becoming more urgent. A central question that has been questioned in the literature is that if the world is on track on a transition away from fossil fuels or if we are only adding renewable energy to the energy mix in a world that continues to grow and consume more energy. Because of the above mentioned, this thesis aims to investigate if the increased generation of electricity from renewable sources are displacing the generation of electricity from fossil fuels. This is tested using a time and country fixed effects model including 176 countries with yearly observations from 2000 to 2020. The result from the regression showed that one additional kWh electricity generated from renewable sources has not statistically managed to displace one kWh of electricity generated from fossil fuels, net of controls. Previous studies using a similar methodology but on older time frames has shown result were almost no displacement has occurred when renewable sources have been added. The result from this thesis should not be interpreted as that the transition is not going to happen since it might be that the global initiatives taken around the globe to make the transition happenis not get visible in the numbers used in thesis, but the result does on the other hand indicate that several economic, political, and social factors has made the transition to renewables difficult, and that we should not assume that renewable energy will replace fossil fuels for electricity generation without policy measures that supports the transition.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
1 - 31 of 31
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf