du.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1234567 1 - 50 of 739
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Abis, Paolo
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Class Struggle, Elitism and Social Collectivism in Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s Devil on the Cross: A Marxist Approach2011Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Ngugi wa Thiong’o’s Devil on the Cross represents both an insightful interpretation and a scathing critique of Kenyan politics and society during the period of neo-colonialism. The present thesis aims to explore, with the help of Marxist ideology and criticism, the relevance of the issues of class struggle, elitism and social collectivism in the novel. At the same time, this study will attempt to define Devil on the Cross as a "national allegory" depicting situations that are common to almost all post-colonial societies, and in particular, how the novel's ideological and political commitment is an important feature as it reflects Ngugi’s effort to draw attention to how Kenya and Africa as a whole suffered from imperialism, neo-colonialism, and a corrupt and greedy capitalist society.

  • 2.
    Abozidan, Elias
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    On the Second-Generation Migrants’ Hybridity and Otherness in Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of Suburbia. 2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 3.
    Abu Hammad, Omar
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Euphemism: Sweet Talking or Deception?2007Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this paper is to shed light on euphemism in two different senses: sweet talking and deception. I shall treat euphemism from two different perspectives: the usual use of euphemism, sweet talking, in which it is used to maintain one's face and the orthophemistic sense, deception, where 'torture' is referred to as "enhanced interrogation techniques". I shall analyze examples, taken from religious, cultural, political backgrounds, on each case. Moreover, I shall talk about taboo since it is usually associated with euphemism. I shall talk about the referential (semantic) and expletive (pragmatic) aspects of swearing expressions. In this essay, I shall show that euphemism can be used in two different senses: sweet talking and deception.

  • 4.
    Abu Hammad, Omar
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Prosodic Morphology: Gender in Arabic Perfect Active and Passive 3rd Person Singular Verbs2006Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Prosodic /template Morphology, that "draws heavily on the theoretical apparatus and formalisms of the generative phonology model known as autosegmental phonology" (Katamba, F. 1993: 154), is the best analysis that can handle Arabic morphology. Verbs in Arabic are represented on three independent tiers: root tier, the skeletal tier and the vocalic melody tier (Katamba, F. 1993). Vowel morphemes, which are represented by diacritics, are inserted within the consonant morphemes, which are represented by primary symbols, to form words. The morpheme tier hypothesis paves the way to understand the nonconcatenative Arabic morphology. This paper analyzes gender in perfect active and passive 3rd person singular verbs on the basis of PM. The focus of the analysis shall be drawn heavily on the most common Arabic verbs; triconsonantal verbs, with brief introduction of the less common verbs; quadriconsonantal perfect active and passive masculine and feminine 3rd person singular verbs. I shall, too, cast the light on some vowel changes that some verbs undergo when voice changes.

  • 5.
    Agerberg, Alexandra
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Jay Gatsby and Myrtle Wilson – Victims of Illusion and Destined to Fail: A Study of False-Consciousness in The Great Gatsby 2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 6.
    Ahl, Josefin
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    "That Little Box of Light": The Presence of Photography in John Banville’s Ghosts 2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 7.
    Ali, Akbar
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Concreteness in Business letters: a Corpus-based Analysis of British and Pakistani English2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Linguistic features of business letters have been a research target of both linguists and business writers. In this study, the language of British and Pakistani Business letters was compared and contrasted in terms of concreteness and abstractness. A corpus of 100 business letters from Inner Circle and Outer Circle writers were collected for analysis. The findings of the study revealed that British writers use more specific and concrete nouns, definite determiners, numeral, possessive and demonstrative adjectives, cohesive and rhetorical devices than the Pakistani Writers in order to be become concrete and vivid in their communication. The present findings are rather corpus specific since the data include only two countries; however this study may lead to further cross circle research including Expanding Circle research of business letters in terms of concreteness and abstractness. The issue of concreteness in Cross-circle business English can also be studied from psychological, sociological and anthropological perspectives in future Research.

  • 8.
    Alm-Arvius, Christina
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Ädel, Annelie
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Figurative and Non-figurative Aspects of Polysemy in the Word Language2012In: The Stockholm 2012 Metaphor Festival : Table of Contents : Abstracts, 2012, 6-7 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Almgren, Malin
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Motivation in English language acquisition: English as a foreign language in upper secondary school2015Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is about students’ motivation to learn English and the aim is to find out if their scores on the national test can be correlated with their reported level of motivation. As English has become a global language, it is taught in Swedish school as an obligatory subject. When speaking about learning English, it is common to approach the subject of what motivates students to learn. Theories developed on the subject suggest that there are different kinds of motivation and this thesis focuses on integrative and instrumental motivation and the L2 motivational system, which have been said to be important aspects of motivation. The study was done by handing out a questionnaire to 45 students in an upper secondary school, containing statements and questions about their motivation to learn English, and then comparing their answers with their grades. When analyzing the results, it was found that there is a correlation between the answers to the statements and the students’ scores on the national test. The lower scoring students showed more tendencies to disagree with the statements while the higher scoring students more often agreed. These findings suggest that motivation can have a visible effect on students’ performance in English.

  • 10.
    Altéus-Stenqvist, Charlotte
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    The difference in usage of first-person pronouns Between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study has been looking for any differences in the use of first-person

    pronouns between Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, and it has also tried to

    clarify whether Hillary Clinton uses I-words more frequently than we-words.

    The data has been gathered from pre-election speeches, and frequencies,

    rankings and referent categories have been analyzed. The study has found that

    there are some differences in the use of first-person pronouns between Hillary

    Clinton and Bernie Sanders. The singular pronouns show us how they choose to

    present themselves to the voter. The plural pronouns show us which referent

    categories, or ingroups, the candidates identify themselves with, and if there are

    any signs of what Billig calls Banal Nationalism (1995) in their speeches.

    Overall, the results show that Hillary Clinton uses I-words and we-words more

    frequently than Bernie Sanders does, but opposite to what some online news

    sites have suggested, this study show that her frequencies of we-words are

    higher than her frequencies of I-words.

  • 11.
    Amukena Nyqvist, Sisiwe
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    English as a Lingua Franca in Namibia:: Teachers’ Attitudes Towards English as a Medium of Instruction in Classrooms2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to investigate Namibian teachers’ attitudes towards English as a medium of instruction in Namibian classrooms. Regardless of the fact that English has no historical ties with Namibia, English still operates as the official language and the language of instruction in schools. This study briefly discusses the probable reasons for choosing English as an official language in Namibia, and as the medium of instruction in educational institutions. Furthermore, it discusses the attitudes that Namibian teachers have towards English as a medium of instruction in Namibian classrooms. A pilot electronic questionnaire, a revised questionnaire, and telephone interviews were used to acquire data for the study. The results indicate that English is a challenge for many learners and this poses a challenge to teachers as well. However, a majority of teachers from this study portray English as the language that is capable of uniting Namibian learners from different backgrounds, and a language that makes education possible in Namibia. In addition, teachers also reported that knowledge of English opens up educational opportunities for learners to study abroad.

  • 12.
    Andersson Falk, Erik
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Occupying a cage:: The construction of femininity in Tennessee Williams’ Cat on a Hot Tin Roof.2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 13.
    Arcos López, Victor Hugo
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Characterising International English: A Description of English among International Students at DalaUniversity2004Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
  • 14.
    Assadnassab, Afshin
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Displacement, an Unknown Freedom: Cultural Identity in Jhumpa Lahiri's The Namesake2012Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 15.
    Assmundson, Mikael
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Persuading the Public: A Linguistic Analysis of Barack Obama’s Speech on “Super Tuesday” 20082008Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This essay examines the persuasive side of language in a speech given by Senator Barack Obama on Super Tuesday in February 2008. It studies how Senator Obama utilizes language to convince and persuade his audience. This is done from an Aristotelian point of view, meaning that the study focuses foremost on how the senator’s word choices relate to Aristotle’s three means of persuasion, ethos, pathos and logos. Those basic guiding principles are relevant to use since Aristotle’s work on the subject of rhetoric is still today one of the most relevant works in that field. The analysis is basically performed through personal observations guided by previous studies, within the frame of Aristotelian rhetoric. The results show how Senator Obama enforces the three means of persuasion through language and how it can be considered persuasive. The study might add to rhetoric studies from a linguistic perspective since it reaches a better understanding of language used in the field of politics, where rhetoric is a prominent component.

  • 16.
    Astrén, Johanna
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Hogwarts, Muggles and Quidditch: A Study of the Translation of Names in J.K. Rowling's Harry Potter Books2004Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this C-essay is to discuss the translation of some of the names in J.K. Rowling’s immensely popular Harry Potter books and look at how the translation agrees with and/or deviates from the original. Special focus is put on features such as alliterations, allusions and imaginative inventions, which are characteristic of J.K Rowling’s style and may be particularly tricky and challenging when translating. A comparison is made between the names in the original texts and the translated texts. The names are divided into different categories, such as names of characters, places etc. I argue that the translator uses different strategies when translating different types of names. Focus is on the Swedish translation, but Norwegian examples are included too.

  • 17.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    A case study of a distance degree program in Vietnam: Examples from a learner-centered approach to distance education.2010In: Cases on Professional Distance Education Degree Programs and Practices: Successes, Challenges and Issues / [ed] Sullivan, Kirk; Czigler, Peter; Hellgren, Jenny, Hershey, PA: Information Science Publishing , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The English Department at Högskolan Dalarna, Sweden, participates in a distance learning program with the Faculty of Education at Vietnam National University. Students who enroll in this program are teachers of English at secondary or tertiary institutions, and will study half-time for two years to complete a Master’s degree in English Linguistics. The distance program, adapted specifically to accommodate the Vietnamese students in terms of cultural differences as well as inexperience with distance methodology, is characterized by three design features: testing, technical training, and fostering a community of learners. The design of the courses also reflects a learner-centered approach that addresses common problem areas in distance education by promoting interactivity. Central to the overall program is the maintenance of different channels of communication, reflecting an effort to support the students academically and socially, both as individuals and members of a learning community. In this way, the effects of physical and cultural distances are minimized.

  • 18.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    A corpus approach to discursive constructions of a hip-hop identity2008In: Corpora and Discourse: The challenges of different settings / [ed] Reppen, Randi; Ädel, Annelie, Amsterdam: John Benjamins , 2008, 211-240 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter is an analysis of a 100,000-word corpus consisting of message-board postings on hip-hop websites. A discourse analysis of this corpus reveals three strategies employed by the posters to identify themselves as members of the hip-hop community in the otherwise anonymous setting of the internet: (1) defined openings and closings, (2) repeated use of slang and taboo terms, and (3) performance of verbal art. Each strategy is characterized by the codification of non-standard grammar and pronunciations characteristic of speech, as well as by the use of non-standard orthography. The purpose of the discourse is shown to be a performance of identity, whereby language is used and recognized as the discursive construction of one’s hip-hop identity.

  • 19.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    A Descriptive Analysis of the Social Functions of Swearing in American English2000Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The methodology of the present study, designed for the purpose of collecting quantitative and qualitative data, reflects a sociolinguistic approach to swearing, allowing for an investigation of the relationship between swear word usage and social context. Swearing utterances and details of the social context in which they were made were recorded discretely and anonymously with the use of field notes within the University of Florida undergraduate student speech community. Sixty members of this speech community also participated in a six-part questionnaire which elicited information regarding use of and attitudes towards swear words. Eleven of the questionnaire participants furthermore participated in an ethnographic interview to discuss the questionnaire and the subject of swearing in greater depth. Previous research had established swearing as both a frequently occurring speech behavior within the university speech community (Cameron, 1969; Jay, 1986; Nerbonne and Hipskind, 1972) as well as a highly offensive one (Driscoll, 1981; Jay, 1977, 1978, 1986; Mabry, 1975; Manning and Melchiori, 1974). The resulting ‘swearing paradox’ represents the question of how frequency and offensiveness can be directly related. The results of the present study explicate the swearing paradox by providing evidence of a discrepancy between the type of swearing that is most characteristic of social interaction within the university speech community and the type of swearing which is typically presented in offensiveness ratings tasks. The use of swear words in conversational American English was revealed to be a linguistic device used to affirm in-group membership and establish boundaries and social norms for language use. Intraspeaker and interspeaker variation in the use of and attitudes towards swear words was shown to be primarily a function of interlocutor gender and race. The data show evidence of males imposing standards of language use on females and suggest that different races use swear words to fulfil different social functions. Finally, the data suggest that the members of the focus speech community impose restrictions and standards on the swearing behavior of out-group members.

  • 20.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    A sociolinguistic analysis of swearword offensiveness2007In: Saarland Working Papers in Linguistics, Vol. 1, 14-37 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The methodology of the present study, designed for the purpose of collecting quantitative and qualitative data, reflects a sociolinguistic approach to swearing, allowing for an investigation of the relationship between swear word usage and social context. Previous research had established swearing as both a frequently occurring speech behavior within the university speech community and a highly offensive one. The resulting ‘swearing paradox’ represents the question of how frequency and offensiveness can be directly related. The results of the present study explicate the swearing paradox by providing evidence of a discrepancy between the type of swearing that is most characteristic of social interaction within the university speech community and the type of swearing which is typically presented in offensiveness ratings tasks.

  • 21.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    A sociolinguistic investigation of swearing in American English conversation: Applied linguistics and the social domain2000In: American Association of Applied Linguistics Annual Conference: Crossing Boundaries, Vancouver, 2000Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Competing contractions in spoken English2006In: ICAME-27, Helsinki, Finland, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well established that contraction, like many other reduced forms, occurs more frequently in spoken than in written language (Biber 1988; Tobin 1994; Tottie 1991; Yaeger-Dror et al. 2002). Nevertheless, contracted forms in written texts have received the bulk of attention in corpus studies, traditionally seen as indicators of register and interaction type (Westergren Axelsson 1998; Biber 1988; Kjellmer 1998; Tobin 1994; Tottie 1991; Yaeger-Dror et al. 2002). In this paper, I investigate contractions occurring in the spoken conversation component of the BNC, first comparing occurrences of full and contracted forms then, following Yaeger-Dror et al. (2002), specifically focussing on competing aux- vs. not-contraction in similar contexts. The current analysis confirms a clear preference for contracted forms over full forms in the spoken corpus and, in so doing, sets the stage for characterizing the variation between two contracted versions of the same full form, for example, there’s not vs. there isn’t. Such competing aux- vs. not-contractions (Hiller’s “Janus Kontraktionen”) in the conversation component of the corpus encourage a lexico-grammatical analysis (cf. Tagliamonte & Smith 2002) as opposed to one strictly based on register, dialect or interaction type. In this paper, aux- and not-contraction are shown to prefer different grammatical and lexical environments. An explanation for this phenomenon is offered based on collocational preferences instead.

  • 23.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Content management in adolescent-directed talk about sex2006In: Sociolinguistics Symposium 16, Limerick, Ireland, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In expert-novice exchanges, accommodation usually takes the form of 'content convergence' (Giles & Smith, 1979), where a lack of shared expertise on a particular topic may lead to the manipulation of content for the purpose of increasing comprehension and facilitating communication. Performed by the expert participant, such accommodation is based primarily on the limited knowledge of the novice. However, my data from expert-novice exchanges on the topic of sex and sexuality show content convergence to be negligible. Instead, accommodation in the form of `content management' characterized by access to or denial of information dominates. The research is based on conversations recorded at a youth center in Germany (German-language data). Five adult volunteers (four males, ages 20, 21, 24 and 39; 1 female, age 20) at the center each agreed to participate in one conversation about sex and sexuality with an inquisitive adolescent (14-year-old female or 13-year-old male) from the same youth center. Because of their social status as well as familiarity and experience with the topic, the adults represent the experts, while the adolescents freely admit to being novices. The adult experts manage the content of conversation by either accommodating the novices' desire to gain information or denying this desire through avoidance strategies. The extent of accommodation or avoidance is shown not to be a function of novice knowledge, but rather of age and gender. Experts accommodate to novices of the same gender and similar age by directly answering questions, being candid, joking and laughing. Their exchanges are further characterized by extensive topic exploration and detail. In exchanges among participants of dissimilar ages and genders, experts resort to avoidance strategies including requests for other-disclosure, hedging, opting out or making third-party references. Persistent topic exploration efforts by the novices are similarly and consistenty deflected, often resulting in conflict.

  • 24.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Discourse strategies and power roles in student-led distance learning2008In: Journal of Research in Teacher Education, ISSN 1404-7659, Vol. 15, no 2, 11-21 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The assertion of identity and power via computer-mediated communication in the context of distance or web-based learning presents challenges to both teachers and students. When regular, face-to-face classroom interaction is replaced by online chat or group discussion forums, participants must avail themselves of new techniques and tactics for contributing to and furthering interaction, discussion, and learning. During student-only chat sessions, the absence of teacher-led, face-to-face classroom activities requires the students to assume leadership roles and responsibilities normally associated with the teacher. This situation raises the questions of who teaches and who learns; how students discursively negotiate power roles; and whether power emerges as a function of displayed expertise and knowledge or rather the use of authoritative language. This descriptive study represents an examination of a corpus of task-based discussion logs among Vietnamese students of distance learning courses in English linguistics. The data reveal recurring discourse strategies for 1) negotiating the progression of the discussion sessions, 2) asserting and questioning knowledge, and 3) assuming or delegating responsibility. Power is defined ad hoc as the ability to successfully perform these strategies. The data analysis contributes to a better understanding of how working methods and materials can be tailored to students in distance learning courses, and how such students can be empowered by being afforded opportunities and effectively encouraged to assert their knowledge and authority.

  • 25.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Hesitations and repair in German2005In: Proceedings of DiSS’05, Disfluency in Spontaneous Speech Workshop, 71-76 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The occurrence of pauses and hesitations in spontaneous speech has been shown to occur systematically, for example, "between sentences, after discourse markers and conjunctions and before accented content words." (Hansson [15]) This is certainly plausible in English, where pauses and hesitations can and often do occur before content words such as nominals, for example, "uh, there's a … man." (Chafe [8]) However, if hesitations are, in fact, evidence of "deciding what to talk about next," (Chafe [8]) then the complex grammatical system of German should render this pausing position precarious, since pre-modifiers must account for the gender of the nominals they modify. In this paper, I present data to test the hypothesis that pre-nominal hesitation patterns in German are dissimilar to those in English. Hesitations in German will be shown, in fact, to occur within noun phrase units. Nevertheless, native speakers most often succeed in supplying a nominal which conforms to the gender indicated by the determiner or pre-modifier. Corrections, or repairs, of infelicitous pre-modifiers indicate that the speaker was unable to supply a nominal of the same gender which the choice of pre-modifier had committed him/her to. The frequency of such repairs is shown to vary according to task, with fewest repairs occurring in elicited speech which allows for linguistic freedom and therefore is most like spontaneous speech. The data sets indicate that among German native speakers, hesitations occurring before noun phrase units (pre-NPU hesitations) indicate deliberation of what to say, while hesitations within or before the head of the noun phrase (pre-NPH hesitations) indicate deliberation of how to say what has already been decided (cf. Chafe [8]).

  • 26.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    I have tagit med the Eimer with the Kuchen: Code-switching evidence for a single syntactic system among child bilinguals2005In: X. International Conference for the Study of Child Language, Berlin, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the case of child bilingualism, much debate has been generated as to whether speech reflects one single syntactic system or two. Code-switching data from child bilinguals has served both sides of the issue. It has been suggested that code-switching, or language mixing, reflects either a) one syntactic system, with harmonious interaction between each language\'s lexical and morphosyntactic features, or b) evidence of limited ability in two separate systems (cf. De Houwer, 1990; Deuchar and Quay, 1998, 2000; Genesee, 1989; Köppe, 1997; Lanza, 1992, 1997; Lipski, 1998; Paradis and Genesee, 1996; Redlinger and Park, 1980). The controversy is fundamentally one of the have\'s versus the have-not\'s: bilingual children have either one large system at their disposal, or two small systems. Can the accuracy of either theory be determined by examining code-switching data from a child bilingual learning a second language? In this poster presentation, code-switching data is presented from an English-Swedish bilingual learning German in a second-language environment. Code-switching utterances involving the child\'s \"third language\", German, were collected over a period of 6 months (from age 2,8 to 3,4), and analyzed in terms of syntax and lexicon. Should the data have been limited to English-German and/or Swedish-German code-switching, the case for two systems would be supported. However, evidence of three-language code-switching suggests the existence of a single system, where switches to the \"third language\" reveal not limited resources in the other two languages, but rather an awareness of -as well as adventurous exploitation of- a further linguistic possibility.

  • 27.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Real language: A corpus study of hip-hop language2005In: AAACL 6-ICAME 26 Joint Conference, Ann Arbor, MI, USA, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this poster presentation, I present an analysis of a 100,000 word corpus consisting of message board entries on hip-hop music and culture. This sample corpus clearly shows that the contributors write in a manner characteristic of spoken language, but that they also exploit the medium of the message board to further identify themselves linguistically in ways which are not possible in speech. This corpus thus serves to exemplify the new wave of "real language" which corpus linguistics has yet to account for. Furthermore, the analysis addresses the problem of knowing "real speakers" by considering speaker identity not as a combination of sociolinguistic variables, but as a linguistic construction of self.

  • 28.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Review of Street Speak: Essential American Slang and Idioms2000In: The Sunshine State TESOL Journal, ISSN 1934-7030Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Review of Swearing in English. Bad language, purity and power from 1586 to the present2006In: Applied Linguistics, ISSN 0142-6001, E-ISSN 1477-450X, Vol. 27, no 3, 542-545 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Scrutiny on the Baltic: A Linguistic Diary from Sweden2000In: The Sunshine State TESOL MessengerArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Students’ Role in Distance Learning2008In: Opening Doors through Distance Learning Education: Principles, Perspectives and Practices / [ed] Goertler, Senta; Winke, Paula, Texas: CALICO , 2008, 43-66 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    1. Introduction Much of the support that students have in a traditional classroom is absent in a distance learning course. In the traditional classroom, the learner is together with his or her classmates and the teacher; learning is socially embedded. Students can talk to each other and may learn from each other as they go through the learning process together. They also witness the teacher’s expression of the knowledge firsthand. The class participants communicate to each other not only through their words, but also through their gestures, facial expressions and tone of voice, and the teacher can observe the students’ progress and provide guidance and feedback in an as-needed basis. Further, through the habit of meeting in a regular place at a regular time, the participants reinforce their own and each other’s commitment to the course. A distance course must somehow provide learners other kinds of supports so that the distance learner also has a sense of connection with a learning community; can benefit from interaction with peers who are going through a similar learning process; receives feedback that allows him or her to know how he or she is progressing; and is guided enough so that he or she continues to progress towards the learning objectives. This cannot be accomplished if the distance course does not simultaneously promote student autonomy, for the distance course format requires students to take greater responsibility for their own learning. This chapter presents one distance learning course that was able to address all of these goals. The English Department at Högskolan Dalarna, Sweden, participates in a distance learning program with Vietnam National University. Students enrolled in this program study half-time for two years to complete a Master’s degree in English Linguistics. The distance courses in this program all contain two types of regular class meetings: one type is student-only seminars conducted through text chat, during which students discuss and complete assignments that prepare them for the other type of class meeting, also conducted through text chat, where the teacher is present and is the one to lead the discussion of seminar issues and assignments. The inclusion of student-only seminars in the course design allows for student independence while at the same time it encourages co-operation and solidarity. The teacher-led seminars offer the advantages of a class led by an expert. In this chapter, we present chatlog data from Vietnamese students in one distance course in English linguistics, comparing the role of the student in both student-only and teacher-led seminars. We discuss how students navigate their participation roles, through computer-mediated communication (CMC), according to seminar type, and we consider the emerging role of the autonomous student in the foreign-language medium, distance learning environment. We close by considering aspects of effective design of distance learning courses from the perspective of a foreign language (FL) environment.

  • 32.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Swearing and the discursive construction of identity among young adults2005In: 9th International Pragmatics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on swearing has traditionally focussed on swear words as single units, for example, in terms of definition, offensiveness, syntactic roles, or semantic categories. In the present study, spontaneous swearing utterances were recorded in naturally occurring social settings, in an attempt to observe the social conditions conducive to swear word usage. Data collected from a university speech community suggest an important role of swearing in the identity construction of young adults. It is hypothesized that their use of swear words functions as an element of the discursive construction of identity of self, while the non-use of swear words can be understood as a construction of the identity of other. The data of over 500 swearing utterances, 60 questionnaires and 11 interviews were collected within a university speech community. The spontaneous swearing utterances reveal clear tendencies among the subjects to use swear words with interlocutors who are most like themselves in terms of age, race and gender. Among the student (young adult) sample population, the use of swear words functions to identify the speaker (self) as similar to the hearer, thus establishing or confirming group solidarity. As interlocutor similarities decrease, however, so do the swearing utterances. For example, the data showed a decrease in swear word usage when interlocutors were of different gender and a further decrease among interlocutors of different race. The fewest occurrences of swearing, however, were among interlocutors of different age. In fact, the questionnaire and interview data revealed age of the hearer to be the most influential variable in determining the speaker’s likelihood to swear. The data indicate that, for young adults, to refrain from swearing is a way of actively constructing (or imposing) the identity of other, thus establishing or confirming social distance. Swearing is regarded as a proprietary linguistic marker of identity, which itself is bound to generation. Within this student/young adult speech community, the use of swear words both with and by younger or older interlocutors is decried as inappropriate. Generation is therefore an important variable in identity construction, as it can award or restrict linguistic freedom.

  • 33.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    The appropriation of media texts as conversational and pragmatic strategies2007In: 10th Conference of the International Pragmatics Association, Gothenburg, Sweden, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A cornerstone of pragmatic theories of the interpretation or negotiation of meaning is the concept of common ground (Stalnaker, 1978), common knowledge (Lewis, 1969), or joint knowledge (McCarthy, 1990), which Clark (1996:92) refers to as the “sine qua non for everything we do with others.” One thing we often do with others is watch television or movies, and subsequently we secure these activities as common ground through talk. In this paper, I analyze conversations among family members whose use of quoting from the dialogue of films and television programs represents conversational strategies whereby common ground is exploited for different purposes. In particular, quoting is shown to be used by children to showcase knowledge and hold the floor, and by parents to establish alignments with other members of the family or indirectly opinionate on an on-going conversation between other family members. The data come from recorded conversations among members of a four-person, Swedish-American family. Each family member speaks Swedish and English and uses both on a daily basis. Three members of the family also speak German and use it on a near-daily basis. The shared linguistic knowledge among the family members therefore represents an additional common ground, which enables the appropriation of media texts in different languages. The integration of quotes from film or television texts into conversation often results in code-switching and, due to the languages typically associated with the different possible familial dyads, crossing (Rampton, 1995) can be said to occur as well. The appropriation of a media text is therefore identified as an appropriation of and alignment with a linguistic identity, resulting in additional challenges to interlocutors with regards to the negotiation of meaning.

  • 34.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    The discursive construction of identity in an Internet hip-hop community2006In: Revista Alicantina de Estudios Ingleses, ISSN 0214-4808, Vol. 19, 23-44 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, the Internet message board forum is proposed as an example of a community of practice (Eckert and McConnell-Ginet, 1992) in which contributors exhibit common linguistic conventions and forms of participation. The emergence of individual identities in interaction is examined in the genre-specific context of hip-hop Internet message boards. A corpus analysis of message board postings clearly shows that contributors systematically exploit the spoken and written qualities of the language of message boards, the “third medium” (Crystal, 2001) to identify themselves linguistically. Linguistic conventions or practices reveal a tendency among contributors to discursively construction their identities via a “social positioning of self and other” (Bucholtz and Hall, 2005) as experts or non-experts in the hip-hop community. Contributors’ identities as experts or simply in-group members are further corraborated or established by the codification not only of non-standard pronunciations and grammar characteristic of speech, but also of non-standard orthography, which demands a written forum to be appreciated, as it is neutralized and unremarkable in speech. Because of the written and spoken qualities of message board discourse, both the content and the form of postings can be manipulated to showcase familiarity with hip-hop discursive practices. Internet message boards therefore represent the ideal forum for discursively constructing a hip-hop identity.

  • 35.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Using discourse analysis to assess social co-presence in the video conference environment2010In: Cases on Online Discussion and Interaction: Experiences and Outcomes / [ed] Shedletsky, Lenny; Aitken, Joan, Information Science Publishing , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this chapter, I analyze computer-mediated communication in the form of online, synchronous, professional discourse in the multimodal video conference environment with the aim of assessing social co-presence (Kang et al., 2008). I argue for the applicability of discourse analysis methodology by presenting extracts of video conference communication which illustrate how talk-in-interaction contributes to or threatens the three elements of social co-presence: co-presence, social richness of the medium, and interactant satisfaction. Examples of interaction illustrate how disruptions in mediation serve to threaten co-presence by isolating interlocutors, how multiple modes of communication are exploited to ground participants in a shared communicative environment thereby establishing social connectedness, and how multimodal communication allows for iconic or paralinguistic support of the discursive expression of emotional stance. The chapter concludes with feature recommendations for video conference software development from the perspective of social co-presense.

  • 36.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    So you think you can type: Knowledge performance in net-based learning2009In: National Forum for English Studies in Sweden, Malmö, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this workshop, we consider how the use of new media technologies in net-based education can facilitate or impair knowledge performance. Our examples come from net-based courses offered by the English Department at Högskolan Dalarna, and show different kinds of technologies and educational tools in use. The examples reflect not only the student perspective, but also a teacher perspective, in acknowledgement of the fact that teachers are also performers of knowledge and users of new media technologies. The goal of the workshop is to share experiences of both successful and unsuccessful performances of knowledge in the net-based education environment, and, by including both the student and teacher perspectives, encourage workshop participants to discuss how they and their students can more effectively interact with technology.

  • 37.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Holmsten, Elin
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Multimodal communication and meta-modal discourse2010In: Handbook of Research on Discourse Behavior and Digital Communication: Language Structures and Social Interaction / [ed] Taiwo, Rotimi, Information Science Publishing , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents an analysis of recordings of workplace interactions conducted with videoconferencing software. Video-conferencing offers users the widest variety of channels, or modes, of interaction, combining video with voice chat, text chat, whiteboard capabilities and collaborative document manipulation. The video-conferencing environment is therefore conducive to multimodal communication, defined in this chapter as the collaborative use of any one of these modes or combination of modes within one communicative event. The standard form of multimodal communication is a combination of video, voice chat and whiteboard application. The use of other modes is shown to reflect distinct communicative functions. Communicating via multiple modes can be technologically demanding and consequently affect usability, potentially necessitating the use of meta-modal language among video-conference participants. Overtly attending to the modes of communication during online interaction is therefore shown to be part and parcel of video-conferencing, serving to initiate repairwork and facilitate the progression of communication.

  • 38.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Discourse strategies and power roles in student-led distance learning2007In: Identity and Power in the Language Classroom, Umeå, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The assertion of identity and power via computer-mediated communication in the context of distance or web-based learning presents challenges to both teachers and students. When regular, face-to-face classroom interaction is replaced by online chat or group discussion forums, participants must avail themselves of new techniques and tactics for contributing to and progressing interaction, discussion, and learning. During student-only chat sessions, the absence of teacher-led, face-to-face classroom activities requires the students to assume leadership roles and responsibilities normally associated with the teacher. This situation raises the questions of who teaches and who learns; how students discursively negotiate power roles; and whether power emerges as a function of displayed expertise and knowledge or rather the use of authoritative language. In this descriptive study, we examine a corpus of task-based discussion logs among students of distance learning courses in English linguistics. The data reveal recurring discourse strategies used by students for the purpose of 1) negotiating the progression of the discussion sessions, 2) asserting and questioning knowledge, and 3) assuming or relinquishing power and responsibility. The data contribute to a better understanding of how working methods and materials can be tailored to distance learning students, and how such students can be afforded opportunities or even more effectively encouraged to assert their knowledge and authority.

  • 39.
    Beiranvand, Amin
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Racial Conflict in the United States of America: A Deconstructive Perspective on Native Speaker by Changrae Lee2010Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Written about the time of the Golden Venture incident, Chang-rae Lee’s Native Speaker makes a particular reference to that incident, whereby implying that particular immigrants, on the grounds of their racial identities, are mistreated and considered as aliens by some Americas. While some whites discriminate against immigrants, there is widespread ethnic tension between Korean Americans and African Americans. Significantly, racial conflict between Koreans and blacks and the racist attitude of some whites toward immigrants are mirrored in the relationship between the Korean-American protagonist Henry and his American wife Lelia. That is, due to their different racial identities they do not understand each other and they always argue. However, toward the end of the novel, Henry and Lelia come to understand each other. While ethnic conflict between Koreans and blacks and certain whites’ discriminatory attitudes toward immigrants is serious one, the novel suggests the unimportance of racial identity. In other words, the novel concludes that there is no discriminatory treatment of immigrants and, in fact, every one is a native Speaker in America. In the novel there is no message of how racial conflict could be resolved. However, this essay suggests that by investigating how the tension between Henry and Lelia is resolved, one could suggest a solution for the ethnicity problem in America and in real life.

  • 40.
    Berg, Mari
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Female Emancipation through Education: Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre2000Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
  • 41.
    Berg, Mari
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Female Style and Rhetoric: Mary Wollstonecraft and Margaret Fuller Arguing the Rights of Woman2001Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
  • 42.
    Berkeley Cotter, Nuno
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Winding Back the Clocks: History and fiction in Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children 2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 43.
    Beslagic, Deni
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    "It was hot as hell and the windows were all steamy": A Queer Reading of The Catcher in the Rye with Didactic Considerations2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 44.
    Björlestrand, Mattias
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Comparing RP with GenAm2004Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor)Student thesis
  • 45.
    Blomstrand, Sebastian
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    On the Road to "IT": Kerouac and Spontaneity2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 46.
    Blomstrand, Sebastian
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    On the Road to "IT": Kerouac and Spontaneity2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 47.
    Bolmefalk, Jennifer
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Removing the Blindfold and Adding a Fedora: Challenging the Role of Women in Patriarchal Society through the Act of Cross-dressing in Siri Hustvedt’s The Blindfold. A Feminist/Queer Reading2016Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 48.
    Bolmefalk, Jennifer
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Removing the Blindfold and Adding a Fedora: Challenging the Role of Women in Patriarchal Society through the Act of Cross-dressing in Siri Hustvedt’s The Blindfold. A Feminist/Queer Reading2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 49.
    Boo, Paula
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    A Destructive Myth of Masculinity: Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest from a Men’s Studies Perspective2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 50.
    Boremyr, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Reading Orwell’s Animals: An animal-oriented study of George Orwell’s political satire Animal Farm 2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
1234567 1 - 50 of 739
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf