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  • 1.
    Biggs, Jeremy
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    The Ideological Transformation of the Icon Chairman Mao during the Four Modernisations period: As illustrated by "Melody of Youth, Beautiful Soul"2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    After Chairman Mao's death, in the late 1980's, Mao was removed from official government communications and his iconography transformed from having a specific meaning generation role linked to Maoist ideology, to becoming available for use as a commodity. In this research I use cultural theorist Jacques Derrida's theory of Hauntology and the deconstruction method to analyse a representative Chinese Propaganda poster, "Melody of Youth, Beautiful Soul", in order to ascertain the effect Mao's death had on the Iconography of Chairman Mao, and how Mao is ideologically transformed during this period.

    Analysing the painting I found specific symbols associated with the iconography of Mao that had been adopted and transformed for the purposes of the CCP. These symbols both suggested the presence of Chairman Mao, as well as negated that presence through being co-opted for other purposes.

    Using these symbols and writings about the period I deduced that during this period the CCP had to rely on existing symbols of power and authority in order to communicate and legitimise regime change whilst maintaining the semblance of continuity. At the same time they had to decouple these symbols from their original meanings in order to distance themselves from the past and redefine the ideology of China.

    In the process, Mao's iconography was decoupled from its Maoist ideological heritage and transformed into abstract symbols of power, doctrine and so on. This means that the transformation had made them available to use as an "open basket" into which new, related meanings could be placed – including serving as a commodity.

  • 2.
    Blackmoor, Matthew
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Generational Politics and Taiwan-U.S. SecurityIssues: How do the views of Taiwan’s generations compare on theU.S. security commitment?2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Sovereignty over Taiwan remains one of the most contentious issues of the

    modern era, and disagreements on both sides of the Taiwan Strait persist to this

    day. The United States continues to have an active interest in the situation, often

    playing the role of arbiter between the governments of Beijing and Taipei. With

    Taiwan’s transition to a multi-party democracy in the late 80s and early 90s, there

    has been a growing body of research into public opinion on the island. Existing

    literature has found both party identification and independence/unification

    support to impact on public attitudes regarding cross-strait security issues.

    However, the impact of generation is comparatively under examined. The current

    study builds on recent research into Taiwan’s generational politics. A

    questionnaire was distributed to members of the public in Taiwan to determine

    how attitudes vary by generation on the security commitment between the United

    States and Taiwan. An analysis of survey responses failed to establish a correlation

    between generation and attitudes towards U.S. support. Nevertheless,

    generational politics adds nuance to our understanding of public opinion in

    Taiwan concerning cross-strait relations.

  • 3.
    Edenborg, Fredrik
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Chinese guanxi and gift giving culture – how tounderstand and deal with Chinese guanxi and giftgiving in business.2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    As China has developed rapidly, western companies and investors are now paying more and moreattention to China. They are no longer only looking for manufacturing services but also want to get apiece of the enormous market potential that China holds. A common problem that westerncompanies often face in China is the one of culture differences. Two of the most important parts inthe Chinese business culture that foreigners need to understand include guanxi and gift giving. Onlywhen they master these areas they can be accepted and included in the social network that guanxi is.The main point of this thesis is to give the viewer a clear understanding of what guanxi and gift givingin China is all about and how it can be used to help in business and networking as well as point outthe differences between western and Chinese business culture. Interviews have been made withthree companies with different background in order to get a better understanding of the real lifeimplementation of guanxi and gift giving. The findings of this thesis include that networking andrelation management in China can’t exclusively be implemented in professional situations only butalso in daily private life. Gift giving is a way of maintaining guanxi and a good relationship with yourChinese counterpart at all times.

  • 4.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    A gestural coordination model of tone, consonant and cowel alignment in Mandarin Chinese2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Articulatory Phonology (AP) and tonal alignment: further testing of a proposed AP model of tone-to-segment alignment in Mandarin Chinese2010In: Tone and Intonation in Europe (TIE) 4, Stockholm, Sweden, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Digital Technology and Chinese as a Foreign Language: Tools for teachers and learners2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Technology is playing an increasingly important role in language education, and today most teachers of Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) probably embrace at least a few digital tools to enhance their work. In this workshop, an overview will first be presented of a range of digital tools currently used in CFL teaching and learning, such as Adobe Connect, Adobe Presenter, online language learning sites and apps on smart phones. The workshop then proceeds to a structured discussion on these tools; common practices, further possibilities, and potential problems will be considered, drawing partly on the participants’ own experiences.

  • 7.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Gestural coordination among vowel, consonant and tone gestures in Mandarin Chinese2009In: Chinese Journal of Phonetics, Vol. 2Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Mandarin Chinese Pronunciation by Swedish Learners: Pedagogical Implications2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Mandarin (Chinese) tones: Challenges and prospects for Swedish learners2017In: Understanding English in Use in Language Education and Language Studies / [ed] Maria Luz C. Vilches and Ken Lau, Taiwan: Wenzao Ursuline University of Languages , 2017, p. 75-90Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Perception and Production of Chinese Tones by Swedish Learners: Asymmetric pattern and its implication to teaching Chinese as a foreign language2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Perception and Production of Mandarin Tones by Swedish Students2010In: 16. Tagung zum modernen Chinesischunterricht des Fachverbands Chinesisch e.V. Chinesisch auf dem Weg zur populären, Zurich, Switzerland, 1-3 september, 2010: Abstracts, Zurich, Switzerland, 2010, p. 20-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [un]

    In recent years, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of students enrolled in Chinese language course in Sweden – in high schools as well as universities – due to the increased relevance of China within a Swedish context. As may be expected, one of the major challenges for Swedish students is the tonal system of Mandarin Chinese. Further understanding of the production,perception and acquisition of Chinese tones by Swedes is therefore crucial in order to develop effective teaching methodology and, potentially, optimized learning strategies for speakers of Swedish. The current study investigates the perception and production of Chinese tones by Swedish students. The first goal is to characterize the errors made by Swedish students and assess the levels of difficulty posed by the four lexical tones respectively. The performance of 30 students enrolled in beginning-level Chinese courses at Dalarna University, Sweden, is investigated. Participants completed an identification task and a speaking task at the beginning of the course and after one month of study. The results are reported and analyzed on the basis of accuracy percentages,confusion matrices and error patterns. The second goal is to explore the role and potential of Swedish tone-accents for the teaching of Mandarin tones. Swedish is characterized as having pitch accents – a significantly more marginal tonal phenomenon than lexical tones but nevertheless involving pitch contrasts (Bruce, 1977; Thorén, 1997). Previous studies have shown that learners whose L1 (native language) is a tone language (e.g. Thai, Cantonese) may benefit from their L1 in identifying and producing Mandarin tones, compared with learners whose L1 is non-tonal (e.g. English) (Gandour and Harshman, 1978; Gandour, 1983; Lee et al., 1996; etc). It is conceivable that the pitch-accent background of Swedish students may be an advantage in the acquisition of Mandarin tones, which could potentially be utilized in future teaching strategies. The present study contains a preliminary assessment of this issue, through a comparison of Swedish students’ performance in perception and production tasks with those of American students reported in previous studies (Shen, 1989; Miracle, 1989; Hao, 2007).

  • 12.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Perception of Lexical Tones by Swedish Learners of Mandarin2016In: Proceedings of the joint workshop on NLP for Computer Assisted Language Learning and NLP for Language Acquisition at SLTC, Linköping: Linköping University Electronic Press , 2016, Vol. 130, p. 33-40p. 33-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Models of cross-language perception suggest that listeners’ native language plays a significant role in perceiving another language, and propose that listeners assimilate non-native speech sounds to similar sounds in their native language. In this study, the effect of native language on the perception of Mandarin tones by Swedish learners is examined. Swedish learners participated in an identification task, and their performance was analyzed in terms of accuracy percentages and error patterns. The ranking of difficulty level among the four lexical tones by Swedish listeners differs from that found among English native listeners in previous studies. The error patterns also reveal that Swedish listeners confuse Tone 1 and 2, Tone 3 and 4, and Tone 2 and 4, the first two pairs rarely being confused by English listeners. These findings may be explained with the assimilation account: Swedish learners assimilate Tone 3 and 4 to Swedish pitch accents, thus they exhibit a unique pattern when perceiving the tones in Mandarin.

  • 13.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Pitching it right: A comparative study between Swedish and American students’ tonal production in Mandarin Chinese2012In: SLE 2012, Stockholm University : Book of abstracts, 2012, p. 103-104Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Teaching and Learning Chinese as a Foreign Language in Sweden2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    The Production of Mandarin Tones by Speakers of Swedish: The Effect of Pitch Accent on Tone Acquisition2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Tone in Whispered Chinese2015In: Encyclopedia of Chinese Language and Linguistics / [ed] Rint Sybesma, Wolfgang Behr, Yueguo Gu, C. T. James Huang, Zev Handel, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2015Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Gao, Man
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Lundmark, Malin Svensson
    Lund University.
    Schötz, Susanne
    Lund University.
    Frid, Johan
    Lund University.
    A Cross-Language Study of Tonal Alignment in Scania Swedish and Mandarin Chinese2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Gao, Man
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Mooshammer, C.
    Hagedorn, C.
    Nam, H.
    Tiede, M.
    Chang, Y. C.
    Hsieh, F. F.
    Goldstein, L.
    Intra- and Inter-syllabic Coordination: An Articulatory Study of Taiwanese and English2011In: The 17th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences (ICPhS XVII): Congress Proceedings, Hong Kong: Wai-Sum Lee & Eric Zee , 2011, p. 273-276Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study the intra- and inter-gestural timing and coordination in English closed syllables and Taiwanese checked syllables is examined. Kinematic data elicited from a repetition task reveals that the vowel is co-articulated with the onset and coda consonants to a greater extent in Taiwanese checked syllables than English closed syllables; for Taiwanese greater overlap is observed between the hetero-syllabic coda and onset consonants. The different gestural overlap patterns in Taiwanese and English are accounted for with reference to the language-specific gestural pattern.

  • 19.
    Gao, Man
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    An acoustic study of front rounded vowels in Shetland dialect2010In: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America: PROGRAM ABSTRACTS OF THE JOINT 159TH MEETING OF THE ACOUSTICAL SOCIETY OF AMERICA/NOISE-CON 2010, Baltimore, MD: Acoustical Society of America , 2010, Vol. 127, p. 2020-2020Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an acoustic analysis of front rounded vowels (FRVs) in the dialect spoken in the Shetland Islands, the northernmost locality of the British Isles. FRVs are typologically marked and estimated to occur in only 6.6% of the world’s languages [I. Maddieson, in Haspelmath et al. The World Atlas of Language Structures (2005)]. Their occurrence in the Shetland dialect is, at least partly, attributable to a Scandinavian substratum language. There is significant variation across the archipelago regarding several aspects such as (1) the number of lexically contrastive FRVs, (2) phonetic quality (close to half‐close), (3) contrastive length, and (4) lexical distribution and support. This paper presents an investigation of three speakers from one locality in which FRVs have retained firm lexical support. The issues addressed concern the dialect’s overall acoustic vowel space (based on F1, F2, and F3), the position of FRVs within the acoustic space, and what the contrasts among FRVs and other adjacent vowels appear to rest on acoustically. Special focus is directed to phonetic contexts that support the greatest number of vowel contrasts and display the most crowded acoustic vowels spaces.

  • 20.
    Gao, Man
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Zhang, Chun
    Aarhus University.
    Teaching Mandarin Tones to University Students in Nordic Countries - Analysis of error patterns in a perception study by Danish, Finnish and Swedish students2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Gilsenan Nordin, Irene
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Edfeldt, Chatarina
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Portuguese.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Leblanc, André
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, French.
    Introduction: Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World2016In: Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World / [ed] Irene Gilsenan Nordin, Chatarina Edfeldt, Lung-Lung Hu, Herbert Jonsson, André Leblanc, Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2016, p. 11-20Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the phenomenon of transculturality has existed as long as human culture, the increased speed of movement and communication worldwide has made it impossible to ignore in any aspect of cultural studies. In a society where changes were slow and foreign influences were few, an illusion of culture as homogeneous and static may have been easy to uphold, but in today’s ever-increasing flux of cultural change, the perspective of transculturality is more satisfactory in understanding human identity constructions. Compared with concepts such as interculturality, multiculturality, or hybridity, which all may have some relevance for describing cultural encounters, but which often presuppose the notion of cultural essentialism, the concept of transculturality has the advantage of recognising change and diversity, rather than focusing on boundaries or differences.

  • 22.
    Gilsenan Nordin, Irene
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Edfeldt, ChatarinaDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Portuguese.Hu, Lung-LungDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.Jonsson, HerbertDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.Leblanc, AndréDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, French.
    Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World2016Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume takes a broad outlook on the concept of transculturality. Contributions from 19 authors and specialists, of almost as many diverse origins, grapple with this concept, each in their own way. How can transculturality be described? How can it help us understand our world? Many of the chapters deal with literary texts, others with the stories told in movies, drama, and visual art. There are texts about the complexity of the European Burqa-Ban debate, the negative aspects of Portuguese multiculturalism, or the border-crossing experiences of Filipino immigrants in Ireland. Several chapters examine stereotypes, the idea of movement, the dissolution of cultural borders, or the nature of bilingual writing. It is a unique contribution to the field, on a virtually global scale.

  • 23.
    He, David
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    瑞典高中学生汉语声调听辨偏误实验分析2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    To listen to and distinguish the different Chinese tones is difficult, both for Swedish students

    as well as for students from other countries that are studying Chinese. There has been research

    made about students of America, Hong Kong, Japan and Korea etc. learning mandarin and

    their ability to listen to and distinguish the Chinese tones. But only a very little portion or

    almost none of this research studies the Swedish students in their learning of mandarin. The

    author has used a listening test method to measure Swedish student’s difficulties in

    distinguishing the Chinese tones. 10 Swedish high school students were invited to participate

    in the experiment. The results shows that the students are most confident about the third tone,

    while the first is the most difficult to distinguish. The results also show that the first, second

    and fourth tone confuses the Swedish students where the first and second tones are often

    mistaken for each other. The Swedish language is a melodic language. It does not have any

    high frequency tones, only rising and falling. This can possibly affect the Swedish student’s

    ability to distinguish tones in the mandarin language.

  • 24. Hsieh, F. F.
    et al.
    Chang, Y. C.
    Chen, W.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Mooshammer, C.
    Nam, H.
    Tiede, M.
    Goldstein, L.
    Speech Errors in Taiwanese: An EMMA Study2011In: Proceedings of the 17th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Hong Kong: Wai-Sum Lee & Eric Zee , 2011, p. 894-897Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Speech errors in Taiwanese are investigated by means of a speeded repetition task. Our results show that the intrusion bias is also attested for word pairs with mismatched onsets, whereas in the alternating coda condition, reduction errors are the most frequent error type. This cross-linguistic difference can be attributed to language-specific implementation of stop codas.

  • 25.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Another Justice - Litigation Masters in the Chinese Legal Story2017In: Ming Qing Yanjiu, ISSN 1724-8574, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 165-191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ronald Dworkin offered the legal theory which is known as a “chain enterprise”. According to this theory, throughout history, judges have, collectively, created a “law” that was designed to fulfil a specific purpose. Those judges can be seen as co-authors who, together, develop a chain-story. As such they not only create freely but also are constrained by the story made by authors, in this case judges, who have come before them. The law created by Chinese traditional judges is another case: compared with the judges mentioned by Ronald Dworkin, they have relatively narrower parameters of discretion in which they may implement a legal sentence. The limited amount of discretion available to an individual judge is due to the way in which, traditionally, the legal framework has been designed. The fact that traditional Chinese law was first conceived of as a penal code leaves little room for a judge to subjectively interpret a statute. Furthermore, because law is representative of the authority of the government, i.e. the emperor, any misinterpretation will be considered as a challenge to the supreme power. Conversely, while judges are bound by restrictive parameters with regard to the interpretation of the law, a Chinese litigation master (Songshi) who wishes to receive a favorable outcome for his client must be willing to challenge a judge’s narrow interpretation of the law. Conversely, while judges are bound by restrictive parameters with regard to the interpretation of the law, a Songshi who wishes to receive a favorable outcome for his client must be willing to challenge a judge’s narrow interpretation of the law. According to Stanley Fish’s articles that question Ronald Dworkin and Owen Fiss’ ideas about law, Fish construes that, since law is made of language, law is open to interpretations that cannot be constrained by any rules or any particular legal purposes. Stanley Fish’s idea can also be applied to the analysis of the stories of Songshi in traditional Chinese literature. The legal opinions of Songshi in traditional Chinese literature can be regarded as an unexpected event that calls for revision of the standardized concept of law propagated in legal stories. Although they are not welcome, neither by the officials and nor by society, their existence is still a phenomenon representing another version of justice different from the standardized concept of justice and can be seen as a de-structural power to the government. Hence, in this present paper the language and strategy applied by Songshi in Chinese legal stories will be analysed to see how they refute legal judgments and challenge the standardized concept of justice.

  • 26.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Back to the womb – Transdisciplinarity in Law and Literature2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Law and Literature”, which is considered as an interdisciplinary research, assumes that “law” and “literature” are two different and autonomous but complementary disciplines. There are three strands in law and literature movement – moral uplift, hermeneutic, and narrativethat law can possibly benefit from literature. These three strands suggest that literature has something that law does not have, therefore, what literature has but law does not have presumptuously defines what literature is and what law is not. However, this claim, such as literature represents real life, more humane than law, and literary theory that can help legal interpretation have been challenged.

    Law is not lifeless as described that needs to be breathed into life. The reason why law needs help from other humanities is not because law is an empty non-human machine, but because law is in fact part of humanity as literature. If law is self-sufficient and has already owned what literature claims to have exclusively, and if what literature is supposed to be is a fantasy and literature is more similar to law than people think, the boundary between law and literature seems to be blurred. Or, the difference that defines law and literature as two disciplines may have never been existed. According to which, all the differences between law and literature, may not exist by nature, but are created to compare, and to ensure and assure the idea that they are different. If the idea of discipline is ambiguous, several questions, which are also what this paper is going to discuss, will arise: 1) Do we need to change the attitude to and the methodology of Law and Literature? 2) Will the reasons of comparison and the results we want to achieve be different? 3) Why law and “literature”? For answering these questions, the author will examine the idea of interdisciplinarity, point out the misconception of literature and the similarity between law and literature, and explain why “Law and Literature” is so special among all the “law-ands,” from the perspective of the nature of language, to propose an idea of transcendence-ality of “Law and Literature.”

  • 27.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Causation, intention and identity in literature: An adultery case in “Judge Bao”2014In: List of Abstracts for Conference Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World Dalarna University, Sweden, April 2-4, 2014, 2014, p. 13-14Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Challenging the supernatural in the Chinese traditional law: Comparison of Judge Dee and van Gulik’s translation2018In: Law and humanities, ISSN 1752-1483, E-ISSN 1752-1491, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 52-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Robert van Gulik translated the detective stories of Judge Dee (Dee Gong An), however, he did not translate everything in the original text. He omitted some parts and rewrote them to suit the appetites of western readers. These parts in the translation reveal important messages regarding the translator’s evaluation of the original text.

    Therefore, this present paper aims 1) to compare the translation and the original text to illuminate ideas regarding the supernatural in law; and 2) to examine whether the original text really needed to be revised by the translator or, in fact, some legal ideas in traditional Chinese law questioned by the translator have already been presented in the original text.

  • 29.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    From Character to Radical: Chinese Etymology and Pedagogy2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Out of Comfort Zone: Learning Chinese in Chaos2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mandarin Chinese has become a very important language global-wise, even the department of education of Sweden has made it a second language in middle and high schools, and my task as a language teacher is to help students not learn but, ideally speaking, “merge” with the Chinese to make Chinese as their own language. Therefore, how to realize this idea has been a challenge to me.

    Since stage 3 courses (In stage 1 and 2 courses at DU, students, as beginners or only have learnt Chinese for one term, are taught with patterns, grammars, and phrases to speak and write structured and meaningful sentences, as well as short articles) I will ask students to do presentations and activities about some topics, which are related to but not bounded by textbook, which can stimulate students’ self-directory learning. Students, based on the learning materials in the textbook, need to learn by themselves. During such process, students will be able to apply knowledge they can find in the textbook as the pre-understanding to acquire knowledge external to the textbook and then reach a new understanding. (In Robert Han Jauss’s word: horizon of expectation) In so doing language applications based on old knowledge for describing and understanding is extended by studying new materials on their own.

     

    In this presentation, I will explain my method of how I make Chinese as students’ own language by comparing two of my stage 3 courses – Oral Proficiency 3 (Debate) and Integrated Chinese 3:  in integrated Chinese 3 I utilize a psychological effect that makes students balance the feeling of being secured and the feeling of being chaotic (one course has textbook to follow they feel that everything is in control and oriented; and another course has no textbook that makes students feel that this course is chaotic even if this course may have been deliberately designed and structured). I will also explain how students, based on the balance of two contradictory feelings, are more certain, voluntary, and not intimated to deal with something beyond their reach during language activities since they have already had something in reach.

  • 31.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    The legal conflict and self-assertion in Lai He's novels about colonized Taiwan2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lai He known as the father of modern Taiwanese Literature wrote many novels to reveal the miserable life experienced by many Taiwanese, as well as their struggle with the Japanese government during the Japanese occupation from 1895 to 1945. The conflict between the Japanese colonizer and the Taiwanese colonized, which occurred during Japan’s colonization of Taiwan, as shown in his novels, is quite obvious; however, since the legal aspect in his novels has rarely been mentioned, this present paper will attempt to analyze the conflict in his novels about legal cases and concepts from the perspective of law and literature:

    According to “The Study of Taiwanese Novels in the time of Japan’s Occupation (日據時期臺灣小說研究)” written by Xu Jun Ya (許俊雅), all of Lai He’s novels were written between January 1926 and May 1939. (1999: 145-147) Therefore, I will pay attention to the historical background of the law that was applied in Taiwan as well as the representation of law in Lai He’s stories during this period. The repression and conflict depicted in the novels as well as the reaction of the characters, and most importantly, the eventual victory, which is achieved by literary strategies, of the characters over Japanese colonial rule, will be examined.

  • 32.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    The legal conflict and self-assertion in Lai He's novels about colonized Taiwan2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Lai He known as the father of modern Taiwanese Literature wrote many novels to reveal the miserable life experienced by many Taiwanese, as well as their struggle with the Japanese government during the Japanese occupation from 1895 to 1945. The conflict between the Japanese colonizer and the Taiwanese colonized, which occurred during Japan’s colonization of Taiwan, as shown in his novels, is quite obvious; however, since the legal aspect in his novels has rarely been mentioned, this present paper will attempt to analyze the conflict in his novels about legal cases and concepts from the perspective of law and literature:

    According to “The Study of Taiwanese Novels in the time of Japan’s Occupation (日據時期臺灣小說研究)” written by Xu Jun Ya (許俊雅), all of Lai He’s novels were written between January 1926 and May 1939. (1999: 145-147) Therefore, I will pay attention to the historical background of the law that was applied in Taiwan as well as the representation of law in Lai He’s stories during this period. The repression and conflict depicted in the novels as well as the reaction of the characters, and most importantly, the eventual victory, which is achieved by literary strategies, of the characters over Japanese colonial rule, will be examined.

  • 33.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Tradition and Post-Modern: Moral and Legal Identity in A dream about Butterflies2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Truth does not Matter: Legal Storytelling in Japanese drama “Legal High 2”2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    People expect that the truth can be revealed in a trial and the decision then is made based on the truth. However, such expectation is a fantasy because the truth has disappeared since the moment when an incident occurred. What are left about this incident are merely fragments (witnesses and evidences) that need further interpretations. Interpretations are open to possibilities; possibilities mean different stories. That is to say: there is no truth (or there are many truths) but stories; truth actually does not matter in law.

    Law is asked to re-construct the truth logically, based on facts, and without being affected by what outside the law, and then a fair and just legal decision can be made. The idea of storytelling, from the perspective of literature – literary narrative, on the other end is opposite to legal narrative that: a story does not need to be true or real; a story can be as bizarre as it can get as long as it is explainable and acceptable when the story comes to law.

    In a Japanese drama “Legal High 2” a black widow spider woman is accused of murdering her fiancée and his daughter. Since this woman is the only suspect and has been involved in many marriage fraudulent cases, the prosecutor proves that she is the murder based on the motivation and evidences found (the poison she bought from internet) in the crime scene. However, the defense attorney for getting this woman acquitted tells a story absolutely different from the prosecutor’s based on the same evidences.

    Therefore, in this present paper I am going to discuss that: how literary narrative and legal narrative in a law drama create both legit but opposite stories that challenges the idea that law and its language is a tool used to pursue the truth based on logics and facts. And, I will compare the similarity and the difference between literary narrative and legal narrative, from the both sides of legal theory and literary theory about language, to examine the idea of “truth” in law and in literature about law.  

  • 35.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Gao, Man
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Yang, Tao
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Yan, Jia
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Teaching Chinese Writing System in Web-based Education2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Hu, Lung-Lung
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Yang, Tao
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    From Character to Radical: Combination of Modern and Tradition2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Cross-Cultural Communication in Next Generation Language Learning: A Case Study of Chinese as a Foreign Language2011In: Proceedings of the Young Scholar Award Competition for the International Conference on Chinese Language Learning and Teaching in the Digital Age, Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Institute of Education , 2011, , p. 19p. 1-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Along with the growth of globalization, the importance of developing student’s competence of cross-cultural communication have been emphasized constantly in foreign language education. When a teacher, who is a native Chinese speaker, teaches Chinese as a foreign language to foreign students, the whole process is thus not just “teaching a foreign language”, but also a “cross-culture communication”. In China, the concept of cross-culture communication did not draw much attention in teaching Chinese as foreign language until the 1980s, when a controversial and still ongoing debate started. Despite there are already some generally accepted conclusions that cross-cultural communication approach should be emphasized and implemented in teaching Chinese as foreign language, Chinese is still mostly taught to foreigners in the traditional way owing to the lack of empirical work, resources and supports. Therefore, there is an urgent need for research of implementing the cross-cultural communication approach in both teaching and learning Chinese as a foreign language.

    Chinese as a foreign language is now available in both traditional and distance modes. In the last few years, global demand for learning Chinese as a foreign language has been dramatically increasing. And since the traditional mode of education cannot satisfy specific needs of some students, a new generation of distance education, supported by the fast maturing videoconferencing software and the web-based learning in general, generates new alternatives and possibilities for both teaching and learning Chinese as a foreign language. However, this development also constitutes specific challenges for both teachers and students.

    With respond to the challenges, a trial of an action research was designed to investigate scope of possibilities (and their limitations) in implementing cross-cultural communication approach into web-based courses of Chinese as a foreign language. The research brought together two areas of current research on teaching foreign languages: (1) the cross-cultural communication perspective and (2) the distance/internet-based education. 

  • 38.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Cross-Cultural Communication in Next Generation Language Learning: A Case Study of Chinese as a Foreign Language2011In: Proceedings of the Young Scholar Award Competition for the International Conference on Chinese Language Learning and Teaching in the Digital Age, Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Institute of Education , 2011, , p. 19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Along with the growth of globalization, the importance of developing student’s competence of cross-cultural communication have been emphasized constantly in foreign language education. When a teacher, who is a native Chinese speaker, teaches Chinese as a foreign language to foreign students, the whole process is thus not just “teaching a foreign language”, but also a “cross-culture communication”. In China, the concept of cross-culture communication did not draw much attention in teaching Chinese as foreign language until the 1980s, when a controversial and still ongoing debate started. Despite there are already some generally accepted conclusions that cross-cultural communication approach should be emphasized and implemented in teaching Chinese as foreign language, Chinese is still mostly taught to foreigners in the traditional way owing to the lack of empirical work, resources and supports. Therefore, there is an urgent need for research of implementing the cross-cultural communication approach in both teaching and learning Chinese as a foreign language.

    Chinese as a foreign language is now available in both traditional and distance modes. In the last few years, global demand for learning Chinese as a foreign language has been dramatically increasing. And since the traditional mode of education cannot satisfy specific needs of some students, a new generation of distance education, supported by the fast maturing videoconferencing software and the web-based learning in general, generates new alternatives and possibilities for both teaching and learning Chinese as a foreign language. However, this development also constitutes specific challenges for both teachers and students.

    With respond to the challenges, a trial of an action research was designed to investigate scope of possibilities (and their limitations) in implementing cross-cultural communication approach into web-based courses of Chinese as a foreign language. The research brought together two areas of current research on teaching foreign languages: (1) the cross-cultural communication perspective and (2) the distance/internet-based education. 

  • 39.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Enhancing intercultural communication in teaching chinese as a foreign language: An action research study2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past few decades, the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization worldwide have required a shift in the focus of Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) towards competence in intercultural communication in which the role of culture in the acquisition of CFL and in the pragmatic use of the language is emphasized and promoted. However, most of the current research in this academic area remains only on a theoretical level. Practical examples, particularly with regard to distance learning/teaching of the Chinese language, are very limited. This motivated the implementation of an action research study which aimed at exploring the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and applying intercultural communication theory into a contemporary distance CFL course for beginners. By observing and comparing the performance of subjects in the control and experimental groups, this action research study focuses on exploring three basic areas. Firstly, it discloses the cultural elements which underlie effective daily communication. Secondly, it investigates how students acquire cultural knowledge and develop their ability to competently communicate in the target course. And thirdly, it evaluates how the modified course syllabus could enhance students’ intercultural communicative competence. The findings of the research aim to serve as both a resource and reference for educators and researchers who are interested in carrying out reforms and research in this academic domain.

  • 40.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Enhancing Intercultural Communication in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language: An Action Research Study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancing Intercultural Communication in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language – An Action Research Study

    Over the past few decades, the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization worldwide have required a shift in the focus of Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) towards competence in intercultural communication in which the role of culture in the acquisition of CFL and in the pragmatic use of the language is emphasized and promoted. However, most of the current research in this academic area remains only on a theoretical level. Practical examples, particularly with regard to distance learning/teaching of the Chinese language, are very limited.

    This motivated the implementation of an action research study which aimed at exploring the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and applying intercultural communication theory into a contemporary distance CFL course for beginners. By observing and comparing the performance of subjects in the control and experimental groups, this action research study focuses on exploring three basic areas. Firstly, it discloses the cultural elements which underlie effective daily communication. Secondly, it investigates how students acquire cultural knowledge and develop their ability to competently communicate in the target course. And thirdly, it evaluates how the modified course syllabus could enhance students’ intercultural communicative competence. The findings of the research aim to serve as both a resource and reference for educators and researchers who are interested in carrying out reforms and research in this academic domain.

  • 41.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Enhancing Intercultural Communicative Competence in Chinese L2 Education – An Action Research2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 21st Century, Chinese L2 is facing new challenges caused by the rapid development of information communication technology and internationalization. In this changing global context, how Chinese L2 learners effectively perform intercultural communication has become a crucial element in this education. While it is agreed that intercultural communication competence should be included in the present Chinese L2 education, practical research, such as how to integrate cultural elements into an existing course’s syllabus, remains an open field for scholars and teachers to explore.

    This action research endeavors to fill this research gap by exploring the scope of possibilities and limitations in implementing intercultural communication theory into an Internet-based Chinese L2 course for beginners at the university level and by investigating how it could enhance learners’ intercultural communication competence. The research applies a modified framework for communicative competence of second language education which is originally proposed by Usó-Juan and Martinez-Flor’s (2006). The theory suggests that when enhancing the learners’ intercultural communication competence in a foreign language education, it will gradually enhance the learners’ overall performance in linguistic, pragmatic and strategic competence.

    Action research seems to be well suited methodology in this study since it allows the researcher (who is also the teacher of the target course) to gather evaluative and reflective data from a direct/insider’s experience. In order to minimize the risk of subjectivity in the action research, this research also applies traditional research methodology, such as distributing and analyzing questionnaires, documentary data collections, in-depth interview, etc.

    The first research session of this research was designed to investigate the control groups in 2013 in which the researcher observed how students learned in the target course in its original settings. The data of the control group was then be used as a reference for the experimental groups in 2014 when the students were taught by modified teaching materials in which intercultural communication were highlighted.

    This paper will focus on presenting the findings of the first session of this research: (1) what the cultural elements explicitly and implicitly integrated into this language course are, and (2) how these cultural elements affect students’ intercultural communication in different social scenarios, such as introducing themselves and presenting other people, making phone calls, responding to compliments, etc. The findings are a valuable reference and a stepping-stone towards the second session of this action research in 2014. 

  • 42.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Flipping the Classroom – Integrating Intercultural Communication Competence into a Chinese Foreign Language Course2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of information communicative technology today not only accelerates the pace of internationalization and globalization but also shape the modes of human communication. Facing this overwhelming challenge, the cross-cultural and societal aspects of pragmatics, intercultural communication competence has especially become one of the main focuses in second/foreign language education worldwide.

    Responding to this challenge, the latest issued official documents for Chinese as a second/foreign language education in China propose a renewed syllabus, emphasizing the importance of culture as an integral element in effective communication. However, how to integrate intercultural communication theories into present foreign language courses remains mostly on a theoretical level. Very few practical or empirical studies have been done in this academic arena.

    This motivated the implementation of an action research in 2013 which aims to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and intercultural communication theory into a present Chinese foreign language course for beginners. The research utilizes an interactive online learning platform to deliver a series of online tasks - “flipping the classroom” – to explicitly demonstrate how cultural differences affect the language used by Chinese, English and Swedish speakers. Through case studies and other brainstorming activities, the tasks gradually enhance the students’ awareness of cross-cultural differences in varying social situations.

    This paper will present the findings of this action research, in particular, the design and implementation of the online tasks for “flipping the classroom”, such as: 1) the characteristics of this interactive online tool, “flipping the classroom”; 2) the cultural elements and intercultural communication theory included in the online tasks; 3) the specific tasks integrated into the enhanced course; 4) student response to the tasks and 5) the effectiveness of these tasks in developing students’ intercultural communication competence. 

  • 43.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Intercultural Communicative Competence in Teaching and Learning Chinese as a Foreign Language2014In: CLTA-GNY 2014 Annual Conference 12th New York International Conference on Teaching Chinese: May 3-4, 2014, New York University and Nanjing University, NY, USA: 2014 Annual Conference Program, New York, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, our world has experienced enormous changes due to the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization. In response to these changes, intercultural communication has become the central focus of foreign language education in the West in which the pragmatic use of the foreign language is emphasized and promoted.

    Following these trends, the intercultural communication perspective has drawn the attention of Chinese scholars and gradually became one of the controversial issues in the teaching of Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL). During the debate, a consensus has now been reached that intercultural communication should be a key feature of CFL education and “culture and communication” is placed as one of the main modules in CFL teachers’ education. However, most of the present research in this area is still remains only on the theoretical level. The practical implementation of the intercultural communication perspective remains an open field for scholars and teachers to explore.

    In order to explore practical ways of implementing intercultural communication theory in CFL education, this paper investigates four questions: (1) What does “intercultural communication” mean in the teaching of CFL? (2) What are the elements of culture in the Chinese language? (3) How can the framework of intercultural communicative competence be implemented into present-day education of CFL? (4) How can the effectiveness of applying intercultural communicative competence theory in CFL be measured?

    In order to provide answers to these questions, the paper presents an action research designed to revise an existing CFL course for beginners and aims to investigate the scope of possibilities and the limitations in implementing the intercultural communication approach in the CFL teaching and learning. The paper also presents a pilot study serving as a valuable reference and a stepping-stone towards more comprehensive research.

  • 44.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Role of Culture in the Acquisition of CSL – From the Perspective of Intercultural Communication Competence2015In: The 21st International Conference of the International Association for Intercultural Communication Studies (IAICS) cum The 11th Biennual International Conference of the China Association for Intercultural Communication (CAFIC): Culture, Communication, and Hybridity in an Age of Globalization, Hong Kong, 2015, p. 130-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, the demands for coping with the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization worldwide have shifted the focus of Chinese as a second language (CSL) towards intercultural communication competence in which the role of culture in the acquisition of CSL and in the pragmatic use of the language is emphasized and promoted. However, most of the present research in this academic area still remains only on a theoretical level.

     

    In order to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and implementing intercultural communication theory into CSL education, an action research has been conducted since the beginning of 2013 to review an actual course for beginners. This paper will present the findings of the research: 1) By applying the theoretical framework of intercultural communicative competence, the findings indicated that the existing CSL course provided limited information explaining the cultural elements that are reflected in the Chinese language. 2) The findings also suggested that the cultural skills acquired in the students’ first language do influence their acquisition of CSL. This is demonstrated in the students’ written tasks such as introducing themselves and presenting other people, etc. The findings can be examples and resources for further research in this academic field.     

  • 45.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Role of Culture in the Acquisition of CSL – From the Perspective of Intercultural Communication Competence2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, the demands for coping with the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization worldwide have shifted the focus of Chinese as a second language (CSL) towards intercultural communication competence in which the role of culture in the acquisition of CSL and in the pragmatic use of the language is emphasized and promoted. This standpoint is highlighted explicitly in the recently issued official documents of CSL education in China, 2008.

    However, most of the present research in this academic area still remains only on a theoretical level. Additional practical research related to how culture affects the acquisition of CSL; how culture should be integrated into present CSL courses, as well as how intercultural communication theories should be implemented in this education, remain an open field for scholars and teachers to explore.

    In order to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and implementing intercultural communication theory into CSL education, an action research has been conducted since the beginning of 2013 to review an actual course for beginners. The first phase of the research focuses on: (1) what the cultural elements explicitly and implicitly integrated into this language course are, and (2) how these cultural elements affect students’ acquisition of CSL.

    This paper will present the findings of the data collection from 2013. By applying the theoretical framework of intercultural communicative competence, the findings indicated that the existing CSL course provided limited information explaining the cultural elements that are reflected in the Chinese language. The findings also suggested that the cultural skills acquired in the students’ first language do influence their acquisition of CSL. This is demonstrated in the students’ written tasks such as introducing themselves and presenting other people, making phone calls, responding to compliments, etcBased on the findings of the first phrase, the second stage of the research aims to implement intercultural communicative theory in the existing CSL course and examines the effectiveness of such modification of the course.

  • 46.
    Lindgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, French.
    Johansson, Sören
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Malmsten, Solveig
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Charlotte Lindgren intervjuar Wei Hing Rosenkvist och Solveig Malmsten inför Grammatikdagen 2017 vid Högskolan Dalarna2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    Sören Johansson, universitetsadjunkt i ljud- och musikproduktion och Charlotte Lindgren, universitetslektor i franska, är båda pedagogiska utvecklare vid Akademin Humaniora och Medier, Högskolan Dalarna. De har producerat denna podcast om grammatikundervisning i språk för att uppmärksamma årets Grammatikdag. Den 17 mars 2017 är det nämligen dags att fira Grammatikdagen. Grammatikdagen är ett ideellt initiativ med Språkkonsulterna och Svensklärarföreningen som huvudarrangörer. Dagen firas på skolor och universitet, mer information finns på www.grammatikdagen.se. Podcasten innehåller en intervju med Wei Hing Rosenkvist, lektor i kinesiska och Solveig Malmsten, lektor i svenska vid Högskolan Dalarna.

  • 47.
    Nordgren, Viktor
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Mandarin, the New Language Choice in Sweden: Investigating the Difficulties of Learning Mandarin inSwedish Secondary Schools2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The main theme of this essay is difficulties when learning Mandarin as a foreignlanguage in Sweden. Standardised Chinese, also called Mandarin Chinese will beintroduced as the new language choice in Swedish middle- and secondary schools.In order to investigate what difficulties Swedish pupils face when learning thislanguage, a questionnaire was sent to three Mandarin classes in Sweden. 36participants agreed to participate in the current study. The answers from thequestionnaire were compared to similar research, concerning British and Americanstudents of Mandarin. This essay finds that there are areas where research onBritish and American students point to the similar results as the current research.However, there are also areas where the results differ.

  • 48.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Children, Gender and Chinese Mother Tongue Education in Sweden2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chinese language education in Chinese societies is not only a language subject but also a kind of moral education influenced by Confucianism. As part of culture and social values, gender identity and division of labour have been shaped by the education for more then a millennium.

     

    Similar to Chinese language education in Chinese societies, Chinese mother tongue education in Sweden has inherited the Confucian tradition which aims at inculcating one’s morality. However, Chinese mother tongue education in Sweden has its unique geographic environment – a European country with significant historical and cultural differences compared with the Chinese society. The Chinese students, who are engaged in the education, are situated in a multicultural matrix where they have to negotiate between and/or to integrate their own culture with the Swedish during their socialization of gender. By investigating how the Chinese children respond to and deal with the teaching materials in Chinese mother tongue education in Sweden, this study tries to reveal the role of children in establishing their gender identity in a multicultural society.  

  • 49.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Flipping the Classroom – Integrating Intercultural Communication Competence into a Chinese Foreign Language Course2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of information communicative technology today not only accelerates the pace of internationalization and globalization but also shape the modes of human communication. Facing this overwhelming challenge, the cross-cultural and societal aspects of pragmatics, intercultural communication competence has especially become one of the main focuses in second/foreign language education worldwide. 

    Responding to this challenge, the latest issued official documents for Chinese as a second/foreign language education in China propose a renewed syllabus, emphasizing the importance of culture as an integral element in effective communication. However, how to integrate intercultural communication theories into present foreign language courses remains mostly on a theoretical level. Very few practical or empirical studies have been done in this academic arena.

    This motivated the implementation of an action research in which aims to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and intercultural communication theory into a present Chinese foreign language course for beginners. The research utilizes an interactive online learning platform to deliver a series of online tasks - “flipping the classroom” – to explicitly demonstrate how cultural differences affect the language used by Chinese, English and Swedish speakers. Through case studies and other brainstorming activities, the tasks gradually enhance the students’ awareness of cross-cultural differences in varying social situations.

    This paper will present the findings of this action research, in particular, the design and implementation of the online tasks for “flipping the classroom”, such as: 1) the characteristics of this interactive online tool, “flipping the classroom”; 2) the cultural elements and intercultural communication theory included in the online tasks; 3) the specific tasks integrated into the enhanced course; 4) student response to the tasks and 5) the effectiveness of these tasks in developing students’ intercultural communication competence.

    Key words: Chinese as a second language, culture, cultural pragmatics, intercultural communication, intercultural communicative competence, action research

  • 50.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Intercultural Communication in Teaching Chinese2011In: LMS Lingua, ISSN 0023-6330, no 2, p. 46-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, our world has experienced enormous changes due to the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization. At the same time, intercultural communication has become the central focus of foreign language education in the West. Following this trend, intercultural communication in Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) has gradually drawn scholars’ attention in the East and became one of the controversial issues in the teaching of Chinese. In China, “culture and communication” were placed as one of the main modules in teachers’ education in 2007.  However, most of the present research in this area focuses on the theoretical level and debates concerning how intercultural communication theory should be implemented in teaching and learning CFL.  

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