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  • 1.
    Gustavsson, Catharina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Center for Clinical Research Dalarna; Mälardalens högskola; Uppsala universitet.
    Nordqvist, Maria
    Bröms, Kristina
    Jerdén, Lars
    Kallings, Lena V
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet; Göteborgs universitet.
    What is required to facilitate implementation of Swedish physical activity on prescription? - interview study with primary healthcare staff and management2018In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The method, Swedish Physical Activity on Prescription (SPAP), has been launched in Swedish healthcare to promote physical activity for prevention and treatment of lifestyle related health disorders. Despite scientific support for the method, and education campaigns, it is used to a limited extent by health professionals. The aim of the study was to describe the views of health professionals on perceived facilitators, barriers and requirements for successful implementation of SPAP in primary healthcare.

    METHODS: Eighteen semi-structured interviews with stakeholders in SPAP, i.e. ten people working in local or central management and eight primary healthcare professionals in two regional healthcare organisations, were analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: We identified an overarching theme regarding requirements for successful implementation of SPAP: Need for knowledge and organisational support, comprising four main categories: Need for increased knowledge and affirmative attitude among health professionals; Need for clear and supportive management; Need for central supporting structures; Need for local supporting structures. Knowledge of the SPAP method content and core components was limited. Confidence in the method varied among health professionals. There was a discrepancy between the central organisation policy documents declaring that disease preventive methods were prioritised and a mandatory assignment, while the health professionals asked for increased interest, support and resources from management, primarily time and supporting structures. There were somewhat conflicting views between primary healthcare professionals and managers concerning perceived barriers and requirements. In contrast to some of the management's beliefs, all primary healthcare professionals undisputedly acknowledged the importance of promoting physical activity, but they lacked time, written routines and in some cases competence for SPAP counselling.

    CONCLUSION: The study provides knowledge regarding requirements to facilitate the implementation of SPAP in healthcare. There was limited knowledge among health professionals regarding core components of SPAP and how to practise the method, which speaks for in-depth training in the SPAP method. The findings highlight the importance of forming policies and guidelines and establishing organisational supporting structures, and ensuring that these are well known and approved in all parts of the healthcare organisation.

  • 2. Husdal, Rebecka
    et al.
    Rosenblad, Andreas
    Leksell, Janeth
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Uppsala universitet.
    Eliasson, Björn
    Jansson, Stefan
    Jerdén, Lars
    Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna; Uppsala universitet.
    Stålhammar, Jan
    Steen, Lars
    Wallman, Thorne
    Thors Adolfsson, Eva
    Resources and organisation in primary health care are associated with HbA1c level: a nationwide study of 230958 people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus2018In: Primary Care Diabetes, ISSN 1751-9918, E-ISSN 1878-0210, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 23-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To examine the association between personnel resources and organisational features of primary health care centres (PHCCs) and individual HbA1c level in people with Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

    METHODS: People with T2DM attending 846 PHCCs (n=230958) were included in this cross-sectional study based on PHCC-level data from a questionnaire sent to PHCCs in 2013 and individual-level clinical data from 2013 for people with T2DM reported in the Swedish National Diabetes Register, linked to individual-level data on socio-economic status and comorbidities. Data were analysed using a generalized estimating equations linear regression models.

    RESULTS: After adjusting for PHCC- and individual-level confounding factors, personnel resources associated with lower individual HbA1c level were mean credits of diabetes-specific education among registered nurses (RNs) (-0.02mmol/mol for each additional credit; P<0.001) and length of regular visits to RNs (-0.19mmol/mol for each additional 15min; P<0.001). Organisational features associated with HbA1c level were having a diabetes team (-0.18mmol/mol; P<0.01) and providing group education (-0.20mmol/mol; P<0.01).

    CONCLUSIONS: In this large sample, PHCC personnel resources and organisational features were associated with lower HbA1c level in people with T2DM.

  • 3.
    Randell, Eva
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Umeå Universitet.
    Joffer, Junia
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Starrin, Bengt
    Jerdén, Lars
    Umeå universitet; Uppsala universitet.
    Pride, shame and health among adolescents – a cross-sectional survey2018In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 30, no 6, article id 20160107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Pride and shame are important emotions known to influence identity development and psychological well-being in adolescence. Research evidence indicates that self-rated health (SRH) is a strong predictor of future health. This cross-sectional study, conducted during 2008–2009, aimed to investigate the associations between pride, shame and SRH among adolescent boys and girls.

    Methods

    The study sample comprised 705 adolescents in Sweden aged 17–18 years (318 boys and 387 girls) who completed a questionnaire that included items on SRH, shame and pride (participation rate 67%). Logistic regression analyses (univariable and multivariable) were used to investigate the associations between pride and shame as separate and combined constructs on SRH, adjusting for potential confounders (country of birth, parental educational level, school experience, having enough friends, mood in family and being active in associations).

    Results

    Pride and shame separately were significantly associated with SRH in both genders. Logistic regression analysis of the pride-shame model showed that the odds of having lower SRH were highest in boys and girls with lower pride-higher shame. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis of the pride-shame model the odds of having lower SRH remained significant in boys and girls with lower pride-higher shame [boys: odds ratio (OR) 3.51, confidence interval (CI) 1.40–8.81; girls: OR 2.70, CI 1.22–5.96] and in girls with lower pride-lower shame (OR 2.16, CI 1.02–4.56).

    Conclusion

    The emotions of shame and pride are associated with SRH in adolescence. Experiencing pride seems to serve as a protective mechanism in SRH in adolescents exposed to shame. We believe that this knowledge should be useful in adolescent health promotion.

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