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  • 1. Ahrne, Malin
    et al.
    Adan, Aisha
    Schytt, Erica
    Andersson, Ewa
    Small, Rhonda
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Antenatal care for Somali born women in Sweden – perspectives from mothers, fathers and midwives2018In: European Journal of Public Health, Volume 28, Issue suppl_1, May 2018, 2018, Vol. 28Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Bergström, Eva-Britt
    et al.
    Wallin, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Thomson, Gill
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Postpartum depression in mothers of infants cared for in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Incidence and associated factors2012In: Journal of Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 1355-1841, E-ISSN 1878-089X, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 143-51Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This longitudinal cohort study investigated the incidence of postpartum depression (PPD) among mothers of infants cared for in two Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) and factors related to PPD onset. 123 mothers were posted the Edinburgh Post-Natal Depression Scale (EPDS) and a questionnaire to record infant and maternal data at 1 month, and a repeat EPDS scale at 4 months post-discharge. PPD incidence was 15% at 1 month, 14% at 4 months, and varied by NICU (23% vs. 8%). Pre-pregnancy and/or antenatal depression was significantly associated with the incidence of PPD. Mothers who experienced PPD at 1 month had an almost eight fold risk of experiencing PPD at 4 months. Women who were not offered counselling during their infant’s stay on the NICU had a 60% increased risk for PPD onset. The findings highlight the need for routine pre-natal screening and targeted support for mothers with infants admitted to NICU.

  • 3.
    Dykes, Fiona
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom; Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; University of Western Sydney, Australia .
    Flacking, RenéeDalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom.
    Ethnographic research in maternal and child health2015Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Dykes, Fiona
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom; Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; University of Western Sydney, Australia .
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom.
    Introducing the theory and practice of ethnography2015In: Ethnographic Research in Maternal and Child Health / [ed] Fiona Dykes and Renée Flacking, Taylor & Francis, 2015, p. 1-14Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Dykes, Fiona
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. University of Central Lancashire, UK..
    Thomson, G
    Gardner, C
    Hall Moran, V
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Perceptions of European medical staff on the facilitators and barriers to physical closeness between parents and infants in neonatal units2016In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 105, no 9, p. 1039-1046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Studies have provided insights into factors that may facilitate or inhibit parent-infant closeness in neonatal units, but none have specifically focused on the perspectives of senior neonatal staff. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions and experiences of consultant neonatologists and senior nurses in five European countries with regard to these issues.

    METHODS: Six small group discussions and three one-to-one interviews were conducted with 16 consultant neonatologists and senior nurses representing nine neonatal units from Estonia, Finland, Norway, Spain and Sweden. The interviews explored facilitators and barriers to parent-infant closeness and implications for policy and practice and thematic analysis was undertaken.

    RESULTS: Participants highlighted how a humanising care agenda that enabled parent-infant closeness was an aspiration, but pointed out that neonatal units were at different stages in achieving this. The facilitators and barriers to physical closeness included socio-economic factors, cultural norms, the designs of neonatal units, resource issues, leadership, staff attitudes and practices and relationships between staff and parents.

    CONCLUSION: Various factors affected parent-infant closeness in neonatal units in European countries. There needs to be the political motivation, appropriate policy planning, legislation and resource allocation to increase measures that support closeness agendas in neonatal units. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Ericson, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University; Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun; Department of Paediatrics, Falu Hospital.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Hellstrom-Westas, Lena
    Hagberg, Lars
    Hoddinott, Pat
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Uppsala Univ, Dept Womens & Childrens Hlth, Uppsala, Sweden.
    The effectiveness of proactive telephone support provided to breastfeeding mothers of preterm infants: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial2013In: BMC Pediatrics, ISSN 1471-2431, E-ISSN 1471-2431, Vol. 13, article id 73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although breast milk has numerous benefits for infants' development, with greater effects in those born preterm (at < 37 gestational weeks), mothers of preterm infants have shorter breastfeeding duration than mothers of term infants. One of the explanations proposed is the difficulties in the transition from a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) to the home environment. A person-centred proactive telephone support intervention after discharge from NICU is expected to promote mothers' sense of trust in their own capacity and thereby facilitate breastfeeding.

    Methods/design: A multicentre randomized controlled trial has been designed to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of person-centred proactive telephone support on breastfeeding outcomes for mothers of preterm infants. Participating mothers will be randomized to either an intervention group or control group. In the intervention group person-centred proactive telephone support will be provided, in which the support team phones the mother daily for up to 14 days after hospital discharge. In the control group, mothers are offered a person-centred reactive support where mothers can phone the breastfeeding support team up to day 14 after hospital discharge. The intervention group will also be offered the same reactive telephone support as the control group. A stratified block randomization will be used; group allocation will be by high or low socioeconomic status and by NICU. Recruitment will be performed continuously until 1116 mothers (I: 558 C: 558) have been included. Primary outcome: proportion of mothers exclusively breastfeeding at eight weeks after discharge.

    Secondary outcomes: proportion of breastfeeding (exclusive, partial, none and method of feeding), mothers satisfaction with breastfeeding, attachment, stress and quality of life in mothers/partners at eight weeks after hospital discharge and at six months postnatal age. Data will be collected by researchers blind to group allocation for the primary outcome. A qualitative evaluation of experiences of receiving/providing the intervention will also be undertaken with mothers and staff.

    Discussion: This paper presents the rationale, study design and protocol for a RCT providing person-centred proactive telephone support to mothers of preterm infants. Furthermore, with a health economic evaluation, the cost-effectiveness of the intervention will be assessed. Trial registration: NCT01806480

  • 7.
    Ericson, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University; Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun; Department of Paediatrics, Falu Hospital.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Hoddinott, Pat
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Proactive telephone support provided to breastfeeding mothers of preterm infants after discharge: a randomised controlled trial2018In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 107, no 5, p. 791-798Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of proactive telephone support provided to breastfeeding mothers of preterm infants after discharge from neonatal intensive care units (NICU).

    METHODS: Between March 2013 and December 2015, a randomised controlled trial was conducted at six NICUs across Sweden. At each NICU, a breastfeeding support team recruited, randomised and delivered the support to participating mothers. The intervention group received a daily proactive telephone call up to 14 days after discharge from the support team. The control group could initiate telephone contact themselves. Primary outcome was exclusive breastfeeding eight weeks after discharge. Secondary outcomes were maternal satisfaction with breastfeeding, attachment, quality of life and parental stress.

    RESULTS: In total, 493 mothers were randomised, 231 to intervention group and 262 to control group. There were no differences between the groups for exclusive breastfeeding, odds ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.66-1.38, nor for maternal satisfaction with breastfeeding, attachment or quality of life. The intervention group reported significantly less parental stress than the controls, t=2.44, 95% CI 0.03-0.23, effect size d=0.26.

    CONCLUSION: In this trial, proactive telephone support was not associated with increased exclusive breastfeeding prevalence eight weeks following discharge. However, intervention group mothers showed significantly lower parental stress. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Ericson, Jenny
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Uppsala universitet, Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falu lasarett.
    Eriksson, Mats
    Hoddinott, Pat
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Breastfeeding and risk for ceasing in mothers of preterm infants - long-term follow-up2018In: Maternal and Child Nutrition, ISSN 1740-8695, E-ISSN 1740-8709, Vol. 14, no 4, article id e12618Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breastfeeding is challenging for mothers of preterm infants. The aim of this paper is to describe risk factors for ceasing breastfeeding and methods of feeding until 12 months postnatal age in mothers who breastfed their preterm infants at discharge from neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). The data come from a randomised controlled trial, which evaluated the effectiveness on exclusive breastfeeding at 8 weeks of proactive telephone support compared with reactive support offered to mothers of preterm infants following discharge from NICU. Six NICUs across Sweden randomised a total of 493 mothers. We used regression and survival analyses to assess the risk factors for ceasing breastfeeding and the long-term outcomes of the intervention. The results showed that 305 (64%) of the infants were breastfed at 6 months and 49 (21%) at 12 months. Partial breastfeeding at discharge, low maternal educational level, and longer length of stay in the NICU increased the risk for ceasing breastfeeding during the first 12 months. Furthermore, the Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that the proportion of mothers who ceased breastfeeding did not differ between the intervention (n = 231) and controls (n = 262) during the first 12 months (log-rank test p = .68). No difference was found between groups on method of feeding. More than 85% of the infants were fed directly at the breast. These findings provide important insights for health professionals who are supporting mothers of preterm infants to breastfeed long term.

    Registered in www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01806480).

  • 9.
    Ericson, Jenny
    et al.
    Department of Paediatrics, Falu Hospital.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Estimated breastfeeding to support breastfeeding in the neonatal intensive care unit2013In: Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 0884-2175, E-ISSN 1552-6909, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate the effects of estimated breastfeeding on infant outcomes in comparison to test weighing and to describe staff members experiences of estimated breastfeeding as a method for supporting the transition from tube feeding to breastfeeding.

    Design. A mixed method evaluation. Setting Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) in Sweden. Participants The study included 365 preterm (25th36th gestational weeks) infants and 45 nurses or nurse assistants. Methods A retrospective comparative medical record study was used to assess infant outcomes during a period of test weighing (196 infants) and again after the implementation of estimated breastfeeding (169 infants). A qualitative survey was conducted to explore the staff experiences of estimated breastfeeding.

    Results. No differences were found between groups regarding duration of tube feeding, length of hospital stay, gestational age, weight at discharge, and rate of any breastfeeding. Infants in the estimated breastfeeding group had a higher risk of not being exclusively breast milk fed than infants in the test-weighing group (OR = 2.76, CI [1.5, 5.1]). Staff perceived estimated breastfeeding as a more facilitative and less stressful method for mothers than test weighing. Some staff had difficulty following guidelines while simultaneously providing person-centered care.

    Conclusions. Estimated breastfeeding is a nonintrusive and feasible method for assessing and supporting the transition from tube feeding to breastfeeding among preterm infants in a NICU. However, the increased risk for not being exclusively breastfed is of concern. Additional research is needed to assess whether this method is appropriate and feasible in varying contexts and cultures. JOGNN, 42, 29-37; 2013. DOI: 10.1111/j.1552-6909.2012.01423.x

  • 10.
    Ericson, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University; Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun; Department of Paediatrics, Falu Hospital.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Hellström-Westas, Lena
    Eriksson, Mats
    Changes in the prevalence of breast feeding in preterm infants discharged from neonatal units: a register study over 10 years2016In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 6, article id e012900Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: There are indications that the prevalence of exclusively breastfed preterm infants is decreasing in Sweden. The objective was to investigate trends in exclusive breast feeding at discharge from Swedish neonatal units and associated factors in preterm infants.

    Design, setting and participants: This is a register study with data from the Swedish Neonatal Quality Register. Data from 29 445 preterm infants (gestational age (GA) <37 weeks) who were born during the period 2004–2013 were retrieved. Data included maternal, perinatal and neonatal characteristics. Data were analysed for the whole population as well as for 3 GA groups.

    Results: From 2004 to 2013, the prevalence of exclusive breast feeding decreased, in extremely preterm (GA 22–27 weeks) from 55% to 16%, in very preterm (GA 28–31 weeks) from 41% to 34% and in moderately preterm infants (GA 32–36 weeks) from 64% to 49%. The decline was statistically significant (p<0.001) in all 3 GA groups. This decline remained significant when adjustments were made for factors negatively associated with exclusive breast feeding and which became more prevalent during the study period, that is, small for GA (all groups) and maternal mental illness (very preterm and moderately preterm infants).

    Conclusions: In the past 10 years, Sweden has experienced a lower rate of exclusive breast feeding in preterm infants, especially in extremely preterm infants. The factors analysed in this study explain only a small proportion of this decline. The decline in exclusive breast feeding at discharge from neonatal units raises concern and present challenges to the units to support and promote breast feeding.

  • 11.
    Ericson, Jenny
    et al.
    Uppsala University; Centre for Clinical Research Dalarna, Falun; Department of Paediatrics, Falu Hospital.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Udo, Camilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Mothers' experiences of a telephone-based breastfeeding support intervention after discharge from neonatal intensive care units - a mixed-method study2017In: International Breastfeeding Journal, ISSN 1746-4358, E-ISSN 1746-4358, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: After discharge from a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), many mothers of preterm infants (gestational age<37 weeks) experience a lack of support for breastfeeding. An intervention study was designed to evaluate the effects of proactive (a daily telephone call initiated by a member of a breastfeeding support team) and/or reactive (mothers could call the breastfeeding support team) telephone based breastfeeding support for mothers after discharge from the NICU. The mothers in the intervention group had access to both proactive and reactive support; the mothers in the control group only had access to reactive support. The aim of this study was to explore the mothers' experiences of the proactive and reactive telephone support.

    Methods: This study was a qualitatively driven, mixed-method evaluation using three data sources: questionnaires with qualitative open-ended questions, visual analogue scales and telephone interviews. In total, 365 mothers contributed data for this study. The qualitative data were analysed with an inductive thematic network analysis, while the quantitative data were analysed with Student's t-test and the chi-square test.

    Results: Proactive support contributed to greater satisfaction and involvement in breastfeeding support. The mothers who received proactive support reported that they felt strengthened, supported and secure, as a result of the continuous care provided by staff who were knowledgeable and experienced (i.e., in breastfeeding and preterm infants), which resulted in the global theme 'Empowered by proactive support'. The mothers who received reactive support experienced contradictory feelings; some felt secure because they had the opportunity to call for support, whereas others found it difficult to decide when and if they should use the service, which resulted in the global theme; 'Duality of reactive support'.

    Conclusion: There were positive aspects of both proactive (i.e., greater satisfaction and feelings of empowerment) and reactive support (i.e., the opportunity to call for support); however, the provision of reactive support alone may be inadequate for those with the greatest need for support as they are the least likely to access it.

  • 12. Finlayson, Kenneth
    et al.
    Dixon, Annie
    Smith, Chris
    Dykes, Fiona
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, UK.
    Mothers’ perceptions of family centred care in neonatal intensive care units2014In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 119-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore mothers' perceptions of family centred care (FCC) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in England. 

    Design: The qualitative experiences of 12 mothers from three NICUs in the UK were elicited using individual interviews. A thematic network analysis was conducted on the transcribed interviews. 

    Main outcome measures: A central global theme supported by a number of organizing themes were developed reflecting the views of the mothers and their experiences of FCC. 

    Results: A global theme of "Finding My Place" was identified, supported by six organizing themes: Mothering in Limbo; Deference to the Experts; Anxious Surveillance; Muted Relations, Power Struggles and Consistently Inconsistent. Mothers experienced a state of liminality and were acutely sensitive to power struggles, awkward relationships and inconsistencies in care. To try to maintain their equilibrium and protect their baby they formed deferential relationships with health professionals and remained in a state of anxious surveillance. 

    Conclusions: This study illustrates that despite the rhetoric around the practice of FCC in NICUs, there was little in the mother's narratives to support this. It is of the utmost importance to minimize the consequences of the liminal experience, to improve staff-mother interactions and to facilitate mothers' opportunities to be primary caregivers. 

  • 13.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Amning och utbildning: hur hänger det ihop?2010In: Barnläkaren, ISSN 1651-0534, no 4, p. 19-20Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Feeding preterm infants in Sweden: challenges to implementing the Global Strategy in a pro-breastfeeding culture2009In: Infant and Young Child Feeding : Challenges to implementing a Global Strategy / [ed] Dykes, Fiona; Hall Moran, Victoria, Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell , 2009, p. 43-56Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    The neonatal environment and the long-term impact of neonatal care2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Breili C, C
    Eriksson, M
    Facilities for presence and provision of support to parents and significant others in neonatal units2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 12, p. 2186-2191Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To describe parental facilities for staying in neonatal units, visiting policies, and access to emotional support during hospitalization.

    METHODS: A cross-sectional design was used in which a survey was presented to all neonatal units in Sweden; 34 out of 38 units participated (89%).

    RESULTS: The findings showed that in 50% of the units, parents could stay 24/7 for the infant's entire hospital stay. In 32% of the units, siblings could stay the night with their parents. Units had policies on restrictions for visits by siblings (80%), grandparents (59%), friends and relatives (71%). All units offered counselling to parents, and some units offered peer-to-peer groups (24%), diaries (35%), relaxation techniques (6%) or internet parental forums (6%). All units enabled parents to be at home with their infant and to visit the unit for check-ups (35%) or to have staff visits at home (65%).

    CONCLUSION: Facilities for parents to stay with their infant during hospitalization and to have significant others visit are good, but there is room for improvement. During the transitional phase to being at home, parents are facilitated in being at home before the infant is discharged and are supported by the unit, which must be considered beneficial for parents. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 17.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UK.
    Dykes, Fiona
    University of Central Lancashire.
    ‘Being in a womb’ or ‘playing musical chairs’: the impact of place and space on infant feeding in NICUs2013In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 13, article id 179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Becoming a parent of a preterm baby requiring neonatal care constitutes an extraordinary life situation in which parenting begins and evolves in a medical and unfamiliar setting. Although there is increasing emphasis within maternity and neonatal care on the influence of place and space upon the experiences of staff and service users, there is a lack of research on how space and place influence relationships and care in the neonatal environment. The aim of this study was to explore, in-depth, the impact of place and space on parents’ experiences and practices related to feeding their preterm babies in Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICUs) in Sweden and England.

    Methods: An ethnographic approach was utilised in two NICUs in Sweden and two comparable units in England, UK. Over an eleven month period, a total of 52 mothers, 19 fathers and 102 staff were observed and interviewed. A grounded theory approach was utilised throughout data collection and analysis.

    Results: The core category of ‘the room as a conveyance for an attuned feeding’ was underpinned by four categories: the level of ‘ownership’ of space and place; the feeling of ‘at-homeness’; the experience of ‘the door or a shield’ against people entering, for privacy, for enabling a focus within, and for regulating socialising and the; ‘window of opportunity’. Findings showed that the construction and design of space and place was strongly influential on the developing parent-infant relationship and for experiencing a sense of connectedness and a shared awareness with the baby during feeding, an attuned feeding.

    Conclusions: If our proposed model is valid, it is vital that these findings are considered when developing or reconfiguring NICUs so that account is taken of the influences of spatiality upon parent’s experiences. Even without redesign there are measures that may be taken to make a positive difference for parents and their preterm babies.

  • 18.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Dykes, Fiona
    Creating a positive place and space in NICUs2014In: The Practising Midwife, ISSN 1461-3123, Vol. 17, no 7, p. 18-20Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 19.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom.
    Dykes, Fiona
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom; Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; University of Western Sydney, Australia .
    Cross-national ethnography in neonatal intensive care units2015In: Ethnographic Research in Maternal and Child Health / [ed] Fiona Dykes and Renée Flacking, Taylor & Francis, 2015, p. 89-116Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Dykes, Fiona
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Encouraging breastfeeding: a relational perspective2010In: Early Human Development, ISSN 0378-3782, E-ISSN 1872-6232, Vol. 86, no 11, p. 733-736Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the WHO recommendations that babies should be breastfed exclusively for six months and thereafter for up to two years and beyond this pattern of feeding is far from the global norm. Although breastfeeding is triggered through biological mechanisms which have not changed with time, the perception of breastfeeding as a phenomenon is variable, as it not only reflects cultural values of motherhood but is also negotiable from the perspective of the individual. This paper argues that relationships are central to encouraging breastfeeding at an organisational, family and staff–parent level. This shifts our conceptualisations away from the primary focus of breastfeeding as nutrition which, in turn, removes the notion of breastfeeding as a productive process, prone to problems and failure.

  • 21.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Dykes, Fiona
    Perceptions and experiences of using a nipple shield among parents and staff: an ethnographic study in neonatal units2017In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 17, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Preterm infants have an immature sucking behavior and the capacity to be exclusively breastfed may be reduced for a period of weeks or months, depending on gestational age. Nipple shields have been used, not only as a device to help mothers with sore nipples, but also to facilitate the infant's latch on to the breast. However, the benefits of using nipple shields have been debated. The aim of this study was to explore perceptions and experiences of using a nipple shield among parents and staff in neonatal units in Sweden and England.

    METHODS: An ethnographic study was undertaken where observations and interviews were conducted in four neonatal units in Sweden and England. The data were analyzed using a thematic networks analysis.

    RESULT: The global theme was developed and named, 'Nipple shield in a liminal time'. This comprised of two organizing themes: 'Relational breastfeeding' and 'Progression'. 'Relational breastfeeding' was underpinned by the basic themes, 'good enough breast', 'something in between' and 'tranquil moment'. 'Progression' was underpinned by the basic themes, 'learning quicker', 'short-term solution' and 'rescue remedy'. Although breastfeeding was seen primarily as a nutritive transaction, the relational aspects of breastfeeding were of crucial importance. These two organizing themes show the tension between acknowledging the relational aspects of breastfeeding and yet facilitating or supporting the progression of breastfeeding in the period from tube feeding or cup feeding to breastfeeding. It is a liminal time as mothers and their infants are "in between" phases and the outcome, in terms of breastfeeding, is yet to be realized.

    CONCLUSION: This study demonstrates parents' and staffs' perceptions of the nipple shield as a short term solution to help initiation of breastfeeding but also as a barrier between the mother and infant. It is important that the mother and baby's own particular needs are taken into account, in a person-centred way and on an ongoing basis. Furthermore, we need to emphasise the importance of the 'relational' whilst understanding the need for 'progression'. Holding these in balance may be the key to appropriate use of the nipple shield.

  • 22.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden; Center for Clinical Research Dalarna, SE-791 82 Falun, Sweden; Department of Paediatrics, Falun Hospital, SE-791 82 Falun Sweden.
    Dykes, Fiona
    Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), School of Public Health and Clinical Sciences, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, PR1 2HE, UK.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    The influence of fathers’ socioeconomic status and paternity leave on breastfeeding duration: a population based cohort study2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1403-4948, E-ISSN 1651-1905, Vol. 38, p. 337-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The propensity to breastfeed is a matter of public concern because of the favourable effects for infants. However, very few studies have described the influence of paternal variables upon duration of breastfeeding. The aim of this study was to describe the effects of fathers’ socioeconomic status and their use of paternity leave on breastfeeding duration for infants up to 1 year of age. Methods: A prospective population-based cohort study was undertaken. Data on breastfeeding, registered in databases in two Swedish counties for 1993—2001, were matched with data on socioeconomic status and paternity leave obtained from Statistics Sweden. Fathers of 51,671 infants were identified and included. Results: Infants whose fathers had a lower level of education, were receiving unemployment benefit and/or had a lower equivalent disposable household income were significantly less likely to be breastfed at 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 months of age. Infants whose fathers did not take paternity leave during the infant’s first year were significantly less likely to be breastfed at 2 (p < 0.001), 4 (p < 0.001), and 6 months (p < 0.001). Conclusions: This paper shows that an enabling of an increased involvement from fathers during the infants’ first year of life, such as by paid paternity leave, may have beneficial effects on breastfeeding up to 6 months of age. A more systematic approach to supporting fathers’ involvement may be particularly valuable to those infants whose fathers have a lower socioeconomic status.

  • 23.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Hedberg Nyqvist, Kerstin
    Starrin, Bengt
    Trustful bonds: A key to “becoming a mother”and to reciprocal breastfeeding. Stories of mothers of very preterm infants at a neonatal unit2006In: Social Science & Medicine, ISSN 0277-953, Vol. 62, no 1, p. 70-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A preterm birth and subsequent hospitalization of an infant at a neonatal unit (NU) implies an extraordinary life situation for mothers, in which the maternal role and breastfeeding begin and evolve in a medical and unfamiliar setting. Descriptions of how women experience “becoming a mother” and breastfeeding in such a situation are sparse and this question was addressed in the present study. In this qualitative study, inspired by the grounded theory approach, in-depth interviews were conducted with 25 mothers whose very preterm infants had been cared for in seven NUs in Sweden. Findings indicated the importance of quality in social bonds with the infant, father, staff and other mothers at the NU, for “becoming mothers” and experiencing mutually satisfying breastfeeding. Three themes comprised a structure for descriptions of experiences, social bonds and mediated emotions: (1) ‘loss’ of the infant and the emotional chaos—“putting life on hold”; (2) separation—a sign of being unimportant as a person and mother; and (3) critical aspects of becoming more than a physical mother. The qualities were described as trustful or distrustful, characterized by accompanying feelings of pride/trust or shame/distrust. Social bonds were affected not only by the interpersonal interplay but also by the public environment and care routines. In conclusion, the contextual setting and distrustful social bonds impaired the ability to “become mothers” and the sensation of reciprocity i.e. breastfeeding becoming dutiful and not mutually satisfying. As breastfeeding is an intimate interplay and a personal choice it was considered that the best breastfeeding support would seem to be provision of a favorable environment that enhances the mother's confidence in herself. The contextual setting should be modeled such as to create conditions for a trustful and reciprocal mother–infant bond.

  • 24.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Starrin, Bengt
    “I wanted to do a good job”: Experiences of ‘becoming a mother’ and breastfeeding in mothers of very preterm infants after discharge from a neonatal unit neonatal unit2007In: Social Science and Medicine, ISSN 0277-9536, E-ISSN 1873-5347, Vol. 64, no 12, p. 2405-2416Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In mothers of preterm infants, the process of becoming a mother is initiated in a public and medical environment, in which the mothers become dependent on the benevolence and support of the staff. This setting and an experience of insecure social bonds impair the ability to become a mother during the infant's stay at the neonatal unit (NU), and breastfeeding may become a duty and not be mutually satisfying. Studies on how women experience becoming a mother and breastfeeding after the infant's discharge are sparse and this question is addressed in the present grounded theory study. Twenty five mothers, whose very preterm infants had received care in seven NUs in Sweden, were interviewed once, 1–12 months after discharge. We propose a model to increase understanding of the process of becoming a mother and breastfeeding, after the infant's discharge from the NU. The mother's emotional expressions in this process showed pendular swings from feeling emotionally exhausted to feeling relieved, from experiencing an insecure to a secure bond, and from regarding breastfeeding as being non-reciprocal to being reciprocal. Unresolved grief, the institutional authority at the NU and experiences of shame were three of the central barriers to a secure and reciprocal relationship. The pendular changes give us a deeper understanding of the variations in both attachment and attunement. Perhaps the negative extremes are more prominent among these mothers on account of their infant's illness and their NU experiences. If our proposed model is valid, it is vital that these findings are considered by those involved in the short- and long-term care in order to support the mothers to establish a secure bond, comprising both attachment and attunement.

  • 25.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Wallin, Lars
    Perinatal and socioeconomic determinants of breastfeeding duration in very preterm infants2007In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 96, no 8, p. 1126-1130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe the impact of prematurity, size at birth, neonatal disorders and the families' socioeconomic status (SES) on breastfeeding duration in mothers of very preterm infants.

    Methods: Prospective population-based cohort study. Data on breastfeeding, registered in databases in two Swedish counties in 1993–2001, were matched with data from two national registries: the Medical Birth Registry and Statistics Sweden. Mothers of 225 very preterm singleton infants were identified and included.

    Results: Seventy-nine percent of the mothers breastfed at 2 months, 62% at 4 months, 45% at 6 months, 22% at 9 months and 12% at 12 months. Prematurity, size at birth and neonatal disorders did not show an effect on breastfeeding duration. Being adversely exposed to any of the SES factors (maternal education, unemployment benefit, social welfare and equivalent disposable income in the household) was significantly associated with earlier weaning up to 6 months of infants' postnatal age.

    Conclusions: This study shows new and noteworthy results concerning breastfeeding duration in mothers of very preterm infants, which was not influenced by degree of prematurity, size at birth or neonatal disorders but was affected by SES. This highlights the need for improved support of socioeconomically disadvantaged mothers, during and after the hospital stay.

  • 26.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Ewald, Uwe
    Wallin, Lars
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Positive effect of Kangaroo Mother Care on long-term breastfeeding in very preterm infants2011In: Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 0884-2175, E-ISSN 1552-6909, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 190-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the use of Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) and its association with breastfeeding at 1 to 6 months of corrected age in mothers of very preterm (VPT) and preterm (PT) infants.

    Design: Prospective longitudinal study. Setting: Neonatal Intensive Care Units in four counties in Sweden. Participants: The study included 103 VPT (<32 gestational weeks) and 197 PT (32-36 gestational weeks) singleton infants and their mothers.

    Methods: Data on KMC, measured in duration of skin-to-skin contact/day during all days admitted to a neonatal unit, were collected using self-reports from the parents. Data on breastfeeding were obtained by telephone interviews.

    Results: VPT dyads that breastfed at 1, 2, 5, and 6 months had spent more time in KMC per day than those not breastfeeding at these times. A trend toward significance was noted at 3 and 4 months. In the PT dyads no statistically significant differences were found in the amount of KMC per day between those dyads that breastfed and those that did not.

    Conclusions: This study shows the importance of KMC during hospital stay for breastfeeding duration in VPT dyads. Hence, KMC has empowering effects on the process of breastfeeding, especially in those dyads with the smallest and most vulnerable infants.

  • 27.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Hedberg Nyqvist, K
    Ewald, U
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Long-term duration of breastfeeding in Swedish low birth weight infants2003In: Journal of Human Lactation, ISSN 0890-3344, E-ISSN 1552-5732, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 157-165Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Hedberg Nyqvist, Kerstin
    Ewald, Uwe
    Effects of socioeconomic status on breastfeeding duration in mothers of preterm and term infants2007In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 579-584Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The propensity to breastfeed is not only of importance with regard to the beneficial effects on the individual, but is also of concern as an indicator of health behaviour related to social conditions. Thus, our aim was to investigate the impact of socioeconomic status (SES) on breastfeeding duration in mothers of preterm and term infants.

    Methods: Prospective population based cohort study. Data for infants registered in breastfeeding databases of two Swedish counties 1993–2001 were matched with data from two national registries—the Medical Birth Registry and Statistics Sweden. A total of 37 343 mothers of 2093 preterm and 35 250 term infants participated.

    Results: All socioeconomic factors; maternal educational level, maternal unemployment benefit, social welfare and equivalent disposable income, were strongly associated with breastfeeding when examined individually in mothers of preterm and term infants. Some of the associations attenuated when investigated simultaneously. Independently of SES and confounders, mothers of preterm infants were at higher risk of weaning before the infant was 2 months (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.70; 95% confidence interval ((CI) 1.46–1.99)), 4 months (OR 1.79; CI 1.60–2.01), 6 months (OR 1.48; CI 1.33–1.64), and 9 months old (OR 1.19; CI 1.06–1.34), compared with mothers of term infants.

    Conclusions: In Sweden, despite its social welfare support system and a positive breastfeeding tradition, SES clearly has an impact on the breastfeeding duration. Mothers of preterm infants breastfeed for a shorter time compared with mothers of term infants, even when adjustments are made for SES and confounders.

  • 29.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Jerdén, Lars
    Bergström, Erik
    Starrin, Bengt
    "In or out": on the dynamic between acceptance and rejection and the influence on perceived health in adolescent girls2014In: Young - Nordic Journal of Youth Research, ISSN 1103-3088, E-ISSN 1741-3222, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 291-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescent girls' subjective health, or well-being, is of international concern as the frequency of psychological and psychosomatic complaints is continuously increasing in several countries world-wide. The causes of this development are still obscure. The aim of this study was to explore well-being and strategies for increased well-being among adolescent girls. Grounded Theory method was used, in which in-depth interviews were held with 18 adolescent girls, 17-18 years of age. Results showed that striving for acceptance and avoiding rejection were central for their well-being. When rejection was experienced, emotions of stress-shame were recognized, a phenomena we call the stress-shame cycle. In the struggle to prevent rejection and to become accepted, the girls strived to boost their social attractiveness by impression management.

  • 30.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Lehtonen, Liisa
    Thomson, Gill
    Axelin, Anna
    Ahlqvist, Sari
    Hall Moran, Victoria
    Ewald, Uwe
    Dykes, Fiona
    Closeness and separation in neonatal intensive care2012In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 101, no 10, p. 1032-1037Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper, we highlight the need for acknowledging the importance and impact of both physical and emotional closeness between the preterm infant and parent in the neonatal intensive care unit. Physical closeness refers to being spatially close and emotional closeness to parental feelings of being emotionally connected to the infant (experiencing feelings of love, warmth and affection). Through consideration of the literature in this area, we outline some of the reasons why physical closeness and emotional closeness are crucial to the physical, emotional and social well-being of both the infant and the parent. These include positive effects on infant brain development, parent psychological well-being and on the parent–infant relationship. The influence of the neonatal unit environment and culture on physical and emotional closeness is also discussed.

    Conclusions:  Culturally sensitive care practices, procedures and the physical environment need to be considered to facilitate parent–infant closeness, such as through early and prolonged skin-to-skin contact, family-centred care, increased visiting hours, family rooms and optimization of the space on the units. Further research is required to explore factors that facilitate both physical and emotional closeness to ensure that parent–infant closeness is a priority within neonatal care.

  • 31.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Thomson, Gill
    Axelin, Anna
    Pathways to emotional closeness in neonatal units - a cross-national qualitative study.2016In: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, ISSN 1471-2393, E-ISSN 1471-2393, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 170Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Research shows evidence for the importance of physical and emotional closeness for the infant, the parent and the infant-parent dyad. Less is known about how, when and why parents experience emotional closeness to their infants in a neonatal unit (NU), which was the aim of this study.

    METHODS: A qualitative study using a salutogenic approach to focus on positive health and wellbeing was undertaken in three NUs: one in Sweden, England and Finland. An 'emotional closeness' form was devised, which asked parents to describe moments/situations when, how and why they had felt emotionally close to their infant. Data for 23 parents of preterm infants were analyzed using thematic networks analysis.

    RESULTS: A global theme of 'pathways for emotional closeness' emerged from the data set. This concept related to how emotional, physical, cognitive and social influences led to feelings of emotional closeness between parents and their infants. The five underpinning organising themes relate to the: Embodied recognition through the power of physical closeness; Reassurance of, and contributing to, infant wellness; Understanding the present and the past; Feeling engaged in the day to day and Spending time and bonding as a family.

    CONCLUSION: These findings generate important insights into why, how and when parents feel emotionally close. This knowledge contributes to an increased awareness of how to support parents of premature infants to form positive and loving relationships with their infants. Health care staff should create a climate where parents' emotions and their emotional journey are individually supported.

  • 32.
    Flacking, Renée
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UK ; Department of Women’s and Children’s Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thomson, Gill
    University of Central Lancashire.
    Ekenberg, Linda
    Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UK.
    Löwegren, Linda
    Maternal and Infant Nutrition and Nurture Unit (MAINN), School of Health, University of Central Lancashire, Preston, Lancashire, UK.
    Wallin, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Influence of NICU co-care facilities and skin-to-skin contact on maternal stress in mothers of preterm infants2013In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 107-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To investigate the influence of co-care facilities and amount of skin-to-skin contact during Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) stay on maternal stress in mothers of preterm infants at two months corrected age.

    Methods:  A prospective cohort study that involved 300 mothers of pre-term infants was conducted in four NICUs (two with co-care facilities and two with non co-care) in Sweden. Data on duration of skin-to-skin contact per day for all days admitted to the NICU were collected using self-reports. Maternal stress was measured by the Swedish Parental Stress Questionnaire (SPSQ) at two months of infant’s corrected age.

    Results: Mothers whose infants were cared for in a NICU with co-care facilities reported significantly lower levels of stress in the dimension of ‘incompetence’ compared to mothers whose infants had been cared for in non co-care NICUs.  The amount of skin-to- skin experienced during the neonatal stay was not significantly associated with levels of maternal stress at two months corrected age.

    Conclusion:  The finding that mothers who do not experience co-care facilities experience greater levels of stress in relation to feelings of incompetence is of concern. Improvements to NICU environments are needed to ensure that mother-infant dyads are not separated.

  • 33.
    Joffer, Junia
    et al.
    Department of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University. Center for Clinical Research Dalarna-Uppsala University, Falun.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Bergström, Erik
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Pediatrics, Umeå University.
    Randell, Eva
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Jerdén, Lars
    Department of Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University. Center for Clinical Research Dalarna-Uppsala University, Falun.
    Self-rated health, subjective social status in school and socioeconomic status in adolescents: a cross-sectional study2019In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 785Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social position, traditionally measured by objective data on socioeconomic status (SES), is linked to health status in adults. In adolescents, the association is more uncertain and there are some studies suggesting that subjective social status (SSS) might be more adequate in relation to health. This study aimed to examine associations between SSS in school, SES and self-rated health (SRH) in adolescent boys and girls.

    Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional research design with quantitative survey data was used. The study involved 705 Swedish adolescents in upper secondary school (17–18-year-olds). SRH was measured with a single-item question and SSS by a question where adolescents were asked to assess their social position within their school. Formal education level of the parents was used as a proxy for objective SES. Univariable and multivariable ordinal regression analyses were conducted to assess the associations between SRH and SSS in school and SES.

    Results: In the multivariable analysis, SSS in school was positively associated with SRH, whereas no significant association between SES and SRH was found. The proportion of adolescents with high SRH increased with higher steps on the SSS ladder. Significant gender differences were found in that boys rated their SRH and SSS in school higher than girls did.

    Conclusions: The study shows that self-rated health in adolescents is related to perceived social position in school. Subjective social status in school seems to be a useful health-related measure of social position in adolescents.

  • 34. Joffer, Junia
    et al.
    Jerdén, Lars
    Öhman, Ann
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Exploring self-rated health among adolescents: a think-aloud study2016In: BMC Public Health, ISSN 1471-2458, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, article id 156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Despite extensive use of self-rated health questions in youth studies, little is known about what such questions capture among adolescents. Hence, the aim of this study was to explore how adolescents interpret and reason when answering a question about self-rated health.

    METHODS: A qualitative study using think-aloud interviews explored the question, "How do you feel most of the time?", using five response options ("Very good", "Rather good", "Neither good, nor bad", "Rather bad", and "Very bad"). The study involved 58 adolescents (29 boys and 29 girls) in lower secondary school (7th grade) and upper secondary school (12th grade) in Sweden.

    RESULTS: Respondents' interpretations of the question about how they felt included social, mental, and physical aspects. Gender differences were found primarily in that girls emphasized stressors, while age differences were reflected mainly in the older respondents' inclusion of a wider variety of influences on their assessments. The five response options all demonstrated differences in self-rated health, and the respondents' understanding of the middle option, "Neither good, nor bad", varied widely. In the answering of potential sensitive survey questions, rationales for providing honest or biased answers were described.

    CONCLUSIONS: The use of a self-rated health question including the word 'feel' captured a holistic view of health among adolescents. Differences amongst response options should be acknowledged when analyzing self-rated health questions. If anonymity is not feasible when answering questions on self-rated health, a high level of privacy is recommended to increase the likelihood of reliability.

  • 35. Jónsdóttir, Rakel B
    et al.
    Jónsdóttir, Helga
    Skúladóttir, Arna
    Thorkelsson, Thordur
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Breastfeeding progression in late preterm infants from birth to one month.2019In: Maternal and Child Nutrition, ISSN 1740-8695, E-ISSN 1740-8709, article id e12893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to describe and compare breastfeeding progression, infants' feeding behaviours, maternal feeding difficulties, and mothers' usage of breastfeeding interventions for singleton late preterm (LPT) and term infants. A further aim was to identify associated factors for exclusive breastfeeding at breast at 1 month in LPT infants. This was a cohort study where mothers of LPT infants from a neonatal unit (n = 60), LPT infants from a maternity unit (n = 62), and term infants from a maternity unit (n = 269) answered a questionnaire approximately 1 month after delivery. Findings showed no significant differences in exclusive breastfeeding at breasts between LPT infants admitted to the neonatal unit compared with the maternity unit, during the first week at home (38% vs. 48%), or at 1 month of age (52% vs. 50%). Term infants were more likely to be exclusively breastfed at the breast (86% and 74%, p < 0.05) compared with LPT infants. Multiple regression analysis showed that usage of a nipple shield, not feeding breast milk exclusively during the first week at home, or feeding less than 10 times per day at 1 month were statistically significant for not exclusively breastfeed at the breast. A protective factor was the mothers' experience of having an abundance of milk during the first week at home. In conclusion, LPT infants are less likely to be exclusively breastfed at the breast than term infants, highlighting the need for further research to guide interventions aimed at optimising exclusive breastfeeding rates.

  • 36. Maastrup, Ragnhild
    et al.
    Haiek, Laura N
    Lubbe, Welma
    Meerkin, Deena Yael
    Wolff, Leslie
    Hatasaki, Kiyoshi
    Alsumaie, Mona A
    De Leon-Mendoza, Socorro
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    O'Donoghue, Debbie
    Compliance with the "Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative for Neonatal Wards" in 36 countries2019In: Maternal and Child Nutrition, ISSN 1740-8695, E-ISSN 1740-8709, Vol. 15, no 2, article id e12690Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2012, the Baby-friendly Hospital Initiative for Neonatal Wards (Neo-BFHI) began providing recommendations to improve breastfeeding support for preterm and ill infants. This cross-sectional survey aimed to measure compliance on a global level with the Neo-BFHI's expanded Ten steps to Successful Breastfeeding and three Guiding Principles in neonatal wards. In 2017 the Neo-BFHI Self-Assessment questionnaire was used in 15 languages to collect data from neonatal wards of all levels of care. Answers were summarized into compliance scores ranging from 0 to 100 at the ward, country and international levels. A total of 917 neonatal wards from 36 low, middle and high-income countries from all continents participated. The median international overall score was 77, and median country overall scores ranged from 52 to 91. Guiding Principle 1 (respect for mothers), Step 5 (breastfeeding initiation and support), and Step 6 (human milk use) had the highest scores, 100, 88, and 88, respectively. Steps 3 (antenatal information) and 7 (rooming-in) had the lowest scores, 63 and 67, respectively. High-income countries had significantly higher scores for Guiding principle 2 (family-centered care), Step 4 (skin-to-skin contact) and Step 5. Neonatal wards in hospitals ever-designated Baby-friendly had significantly higher scores than those never designated. Sixty percent of managers stated they would like to obtain Neo-BFHI designation. Currently, Neo-BFHI recommendations are partly implemented in many countries. The high number of participating wards indicates international readiness to expand Baby-friendly standards to neonatal settings. Hospitals and governments should increase their efforts to better support breastfeeding in neonatal wards.

  • 37.
    Osman, Fatumo
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Ladnaan - att må bra: En utvärdering av ett riktat stöd till somaliska föräldrar i Borlänge Kommun2015Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Folkhälsomyndigheten har finansierat ett samarbetsprojekt mellan Borlänge kommun och Högskolan Dalarna för att anpassa och implementera ett föräldrastödsprogram till somaliska föräldrar, samt att mäta effekten av denna intervention avseende föräldrars och barns psykiska hälsa. Studien började med en explorativ delstudie med syfte att samla kunskap om vad somaliska föräldrar upplever som utmanande i sitt föräldraskap i Sverige, vilket behov av föräldrastöd de behöver samt hur ett sådant stöd ska vara utformat. Studien genomfördes med hjälp av fokusgruppsintervjuer med 23 föräldrar (15 mammor och 8 pappor) boende i Borlänge. Resultatet visade att föräldrarna upplevde en rad utmaningar i sin nya livssituation och i sitt föräldraskap i nya landet. De beskrev skillnader i synsätt på barnuppfostran och föräldraskap mellan hemlandet och Sverige och eftersträvade därför att kulturanpassa sitt föräldraskap.

    Resultaten från denna studie samt en genomgång av forskning kring föräldrastöd låg till grund för valet av föräldrastödsprogram samt ett samhällsorienterande tillägg till programmet.

     

    Målgrupp för studien var föräldrar med barn i åldrarna 11-16 år och som upplevde stress i sitt föräldraskap. Föräldrarna erbjöds sammanlagt 16 timmars utbildning fördelat på 12 träffar (10 timmar Connect föräldrastöd + 6 timmar samhällsorienterande tillägg). Effekten av föräldrastödet undersöktes genom en randomiserad kontrollerad studie där totalt 120 föräldrar ingick. De preliminära resultaten visar att deltagande föräldrars barn har förbättrats signifikant i subskalorna ”socialt” och ”skola”. Dessutom minskade barnens oro, somatiska problem, sociala problem och brytande av regler.

     

    Föräldrarna var nöjda med interventionen. De upplevde att de fått en ökad kunskap om hur socialtjänstens arbete fungerar och fått förtroende för deras arbete kring barn och unga. Över hälften av föräldrarna upplevde sig mer säkra i sin föräldraroll och att deras relation med barnen hade förbättrats.

     

    Genom en processutvärdering av implementeringen av föräldrastödet har framgångsfaktorer för genomförandet avföräldrastödsprogrammet studerats. Resultatet visade att de olika strategier som vidtagits vid rekrytering av föräldrar och implementering av interventionen har varit lyckade. Exempel på sådana strategier har varit att projektmedarbetarna som rekryterat till föräldrastödet har varit av Somaliskt ursprung, kursen har getts på somaliska men framförallt att föräldrastödet utgick ifrån föräldrarnas upplevda behov.

  • 38.
    Osman, Fatumo
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Qualitative study showed that a culturally tailored parenting programme improved the confidence and skills of Somali immigrants2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 8, p. 1482-1490Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Parenting programmes tailored to immigrant parents have been reported to improve the mental health of the children and parents, as well as parents' sense of competence in parenting. However, research on parents' experiences of programmes tailored to their needs is scarce. This qualitative study aimed to describe Somali parents' experiences of how a culturally sensitive programme affected their parenting.

    METHODS: The study was conducted in a middle-sized city in Sweden in 2015. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 50 participants two months after they took part in a parenting support programme. Inductive and deductive qualitative content analyses were used.

    RESULTS: A light has been shed was a metaphor that emerged from the analysis and that captured the knowledge the parents gained from the parenting system in Sweden. Parents gained confidence in their parenting role and became emotionally aware of their child's social and emotional needs and how to respond to them. Holding the sessions in the participant's native language was important for the parents' participation and acceptance of the programme.

    CONCLUSION: Parenting programmes should be tailored to the specific needs of the participants and cultural sensitivity should be factored into programmes to attract immigrant parents. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 39.
    Osman, Fatumo
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    A support program for Somali-born parents on children's behavioral problems2017In: Pediatrics, ISSN 0031-4005, E-ISSN 1098-4275, Vol. 139, no 3Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to evaluate a culturally tailored parenting support program (Ladnaan) for Somali-born parents and to determine its effectiveness on children’s emotional and behavioral problems.

    METHODS: This randomized controlled trial included 120 Somali-born parents with children aged 11 to 16 years. The parents reported self-perceived stress in relation to parenting practices. The intervention consisted of culturally tailored societal information combined with the parenting program Connect. Parents received 12 weeks of intervention, 1 to 2 hours each week, in groups of 12 to 17 parents. Nine group leaders with a Somali background who received a standardized training program delivered the intervention. The primary outcome was a decrease in emotional and behavioral problems based on a Child Behavior Checklist. Parents were randomly allocated either to an intervention group or a wait-list control group. Covariance analyses were conducted according to intention-to-treat principles.

    RESULTS: The results showed significant improvement in the children in the intervention group for behavioral problems after a 2-month follow-up. The largest effect sizes according to Cohen’s d were in aggressive behavior (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06 to 3.07), social problems (95% CI, 0.64 to 1.70), and externalizing problems (95% CI, 0.96 to 3.53).

    CONCLUSIONS: The large effect sizes in this study show that this 12-week culturally tailored parenting support program was associated with short-term improvements in children’s behavior. The study adds to the field of parenting interventions by demonstrating how to culturally tailor, engage, and retain parenting programs for immigrant parents.

  • 40.
    Osman, Fatumo
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet.
    Effectiveness of parenting support to Somali parents on children’s mental health: A randomized controlled trial2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Osman, Fatumo
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    The impact of a culturally tailored parenting support for Somali-born parents’ and children’s mental health: A randomized controlled trial2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Osman, Fatumo
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Parenthood in transition: Somali-born parents' experiences of and needs for parenting support programmes2016In: BMC International Health and Human Rights, ISSN 1472-698X, E-ISSN 1472-698X, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Pre- and post-migration trauma due to forced migration may impact negatively on parents' ability to care for their children. Little qualitative work has examined Somali-born refugees' experiences. The aim of this study is to explore Somali-born refugees' experiences and challenges of being parents in Sweden, and the support they need in their parenting.

    METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was undertaken. Data were collected from four focus group discussions (FGDs) among 23 Somali-born mothers and fathers living in a county in central Sweden. Qualitative content analysis has been applied.

    RESULTS: A main category, Parenthood in Transition, emerged as a description of a process of parenthood in transition. Two generic categories were identified: Challenges, and Improved parenting. Challenges emerged from leaving the home country and being new and feeling alienated in the new country. In Improved parenting, an awareness of opportunities in the new country and ways to improve their parenting was described, which includes how to improve their communication and relationship with their children. The parents described a need for information on how to culturally adapt their parenting and obtain support from the authorities.

    CONCLUSIONS: Parents experienced a process of parenthood in transition. They were looking to the future and for ways to improve their parenting. Schools and social services can overcome barriers that prevent lack of knowledge about the new country's systems related to parenthood. Leaving the home country often means separation from the family and losing the social network. We suggest that staff in schools and social services offer parent training classes for these parents throughout their children's childhood, with benefits for the child and family.

  • 43.
    Osman, Fatumo
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet.
    Salari, Raziye
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet.
    Schön, Ulla-Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Effects of a culturally tailored parenting support programme in Somali-born parents' mental health and sense of competence in parenting: a randomised controlled trial2017In: BMJ Open, ISSN 2044-6055, E-ISSN 2044-6055, Vol. 7, no 12, article id e017600Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness of a culturally tailored parenting support programme on Somali-born parents' mental health and sense of competence in parenting.

    DESIGN: Randomised controlled trial.

    SETTING: A city in the middle of Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Somali-born parents (n=120) with children aged 11-16 years and self-perceived stress in their parenting were randomised to an intervention group (n=60) or a waiting-list control group (n=60).

    INTERVENTION: Parents in the intervention group received culturally tailored societal information combined with the Connect parenting programme during 12 weeks for 1-2 hours per week. The intervention consisted of a standardised training programme delivered by nine group leaders of Somali background.

    OUTCOME: The General Health Questionnaire 12 was used to measure parents' mental health and the Parenting Sense of Competence scale to measure parent satisfaction and efficacy in the parent role. Analysis was conducted using intention-to-treat principles.

    RESULTS: The results indicated that parents in the intervention group showed significant improvement in mental health compared with the parents in the control group at a 2-month follow-up: B=3.62, 95% CI 2.01 to 5.18, p<0.001. Further, significant improvement was found for efficacy (B=-6.72, 95% CI -8.15 to -5.28, p<0.001) and satisfaction (B=-4.48, 95% CI -6.27 to -2.69, p<0.001) for parents in the intervention group. Parents' satisfaction mediated the intervention effect on parental mental health (β=-0.88, 95% CI -1.84 to -0.16, p=0.047).

    CONCLUSION: The culturally tailored parenting support programme led to improved mental health of Somali-born parents and their sense of competence in parenting 2 months after the intervention. The study underlines the importance of acknowledging immigrant parents' need for societal information in parent support programmes and the importance of delivering these programmes in a culturally sensitive manner.

    CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT02114593.

  • 44.
    Randell, Eva
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Jerdén, L.
    Öhman, A.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    What is health and what is important for its achievement?: A qualitative study on adolescent boys’ perceptions and experiences of health2016In: Open Nursing Journal, ISSN 1874-4346, E-ISSN 1874-4346, Vol. 10, p. 26-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Few qualitative studies have explored adolescent boys’ perceptions of health.

    Aim: The aim of this study was therefore to explore how adolescent boys understand the concept of health and what they find important for its achievement

    Methods: Grounded theory was used as a method to analyse interviews with 33 adolescent boys aged 16 to 17 years attending three upper secondary schools in a relatively small town in Sweden.

    Results: There was a complexity in how health was perceived, experienced, dealt with, and valued. Although health on a conceptual level was described as ‘holistic’, health was experienced and dealt with in a more dualistic manner, one in which the boys were prone to differentiate between mind and body. Health was experienced as mainly emotional and relational, whereas the body had a subordinate value. The presence of positive emotions, experiencing self-esteem, balance in life, trustful relationships, and having a sense of belonging were important factors for health while the body was experienced as a tool to achieve health, as energy, and as a condition.

    Conclusion: Our findings indicate that young, masculine health is largely experienced through emotions and relationships and thus support theories on health as a social construction of interconnected processes. 

  • 45.
    Randell, Eva
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Jerdén, Lars
    Öhman, Ann
    Starrin, Bengt
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Tough, sensitive and sincere: how adolescent boys manage masculinities and emotions2015In: International Journal of Adolescence and Youth, ISSN 0267-3843, E-ISSN 2164-4527, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 486-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to explore adolescent boys’ views of masculinity and emotion management and their potential effects on well-being. Interviews with 33 adolescent boys aged 16–17 years in Sweden were analysed using grounded theory. We found two main categories of masculine conceptions in adolescent boys: gender-normative masculinity with emphasis on group-based values, and non-gender-normative masculinity based on personal values. Gender-normative masculinity comprised two seemingly opposite emotional masculinity orientations, one towards toughness and the other towards sensitivity, both of which were highly influenced by contextual and situational group norms and demands, despite their expressions contrasting each other. Non-gender-normative masculinity included an orientation towards sincerity emphasising the personal values of the boys; emotions were expressed more independently of peer group norms. Our findings suggest that different masculinities and the expression of emotions are strongly intertwined and that managing emotions is vital for well-being.

  • 46.
    Randell, Eva
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Umeå Universitet.
    joffer, Junia
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Starrin, Bengt
    Jerdén, Lars
    Associations between pride, shame and self-rated health in adolescence2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Randell, Eva
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Umeå Universitet.
    Joffer, Junia
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Starrin, Bengt
    Jerdén, Lars
    Umeå universitet; Uppsala universitet.
    Pride, shame and health among adolescents – a cross-sectional survey2018In: International Journal of Adolescent Medicine and Health, ISSN 0334-0139, E-ISSN 2191-0278, Vol. 30, no 6, article id 20160107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Pride and shame are important emotions known to influence identity development and psychological well-being in adolescence. Research evidence indicates that self-rated health (SRH) is a strong predictor of future health. This cross-sectional study, conducted during 2008–2009, aimed to investigate the associations between pride, shame and SRH among adolescent boys and girls.

    Methods

    The study sample comprised 705 adolescents in Sweden aged 17–18 years (318 boys and 387 girls) who completed a questionnaire that included items on SRH, shame and pride (participation rate 67%). Logistic regression analyses (univariable and multivariable) were used to investigate the associations between pride and shame as separate and combined constructs on SRH, adjusting for potential confounders (country of birth, parental educational level, school experience, having enough friends, mood in family and being active in associations).

    Results

    Pride and shame separately were significantly associated with SRH in both genders. Logistic regression analysis of the pride-shame model showed that the odds of having lower SRH were highest in boys and girls with lower pride-higher shame. In a multivariable logistic regression analysis of the pride-shame model the odds of having lower SRH remained significant in boys and girls with lower pride-higher shame [boys: odds ratio (OR) 3.51, confidence interval (CI) 1.40–8.81; girls: OR 2.70, CI 1.22–5.96] and in girls with lower pride-lower shame (OR 2.16, CI 1.02–4.56).

    Conclusion

    The emotions of shame and pride are associated with SRH in adolescence. Experiencing pride seems to serve as a protective mechanism in SRH in adolescents exposed to shame. We believe that this knowledge should be useful in adolescent health promotion.

  • 48. Tandberg, Bente Silnes
    et al.
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Markestad, Trond
    Grundt, Hege
    Moen, Atle
    Parent psychological wellbeing in a single-family room versus an open bay neonatal intensive care unit.2019In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 14, no 11, article id e0224488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies of parents' psychological well-being in single-family rooms in neonatal intensive care units have shown conflicting results.

    AIMS: To compare emotional distress in the form of depression, anxiety, stress and attachment scores among parents of very preterm infants cared for in a single-family rooms unit vs an open bay unit.

    STUDY DESIGN: Prospective survey design.

    SUBJECT: Parents (132) of 77 infants born at 28 0/7-32 0/7 weeks of gestation in the two units.

    OUTCOME MEASURES: Duration of parental presence was recorded. Scores for depression (The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale), anxiety (The State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory, Short Form Y), stress (The Parent Stressor Scale: neonatal intensive care unit questionnaire and The Parenting Stress Index-short form) and attachment (Maternal Postnatal Attachment Scale) measured 14 days after delivery, at discharge, expected term date and four months post-term.

    RESULTS: Parents were present 21 hours/day in the single-family room unit vs 7 hours/day in the Open bay unit. Ninety-three percent of the fathers in the single-family rooms unit were present more than 12 hours per day during the first week. Mothers in the single-family rooms had a significantly lower depression score -1.9 (95% CI: -3.6, -0.1) points from birth to four months corrected age compared to mothers in the Open bay unit, and 14% vs 52% scored above a cut-off point considered being at high risk for depression (p<0.005). Both mothers and fathers in the single-family rooms reported significantly lower stress levels during hospitalization. There were no differences between the groups for anxiety, stress or attachment scores after discharge.

    CONCLUSION: The lower depression scores by the mothers and lower parental stress scores during hospitalization for both parents supports that single-family rooms care contribute to parents' psychological wellbeing.

  • 49. Tandberg, Bente Silnes
    et al.
    Frøslie, Kathrine Frey
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Grundt, Hege
    Lehtonen, Liisa
    Moen, Atle
    Parent-infant closeness, parents' participation, and nursing support in single-family room and open bay NICUs2018In: Journal of Perinatal & Neonatal Nursing, ISSN 0893-2190, E-ISSN 1550-5073, Vol. 32, no 4, p. E22-E32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This was a prospective survey study, comparing parent-infant closeness, parents' perceptions of nursing support, and participation in medical rounds in single-family room (SFR) and an open bay (OB) neonatal intensive care units. Nurses' assessments of provided support were also measured. In total, 115 parents of 64 preterm infants less than 35 weeks' gestational age and 129 nurses participated. Parents recorded the presence and skin-to-skin care. Parents were sent 9 text message questions in random order. Nurses answered corresponding Internet-based questions. SFR mothers were more present, 20 hours daily (median) versus 7 hours (P < .001), initiated skin-to-skin contact (SSC) at 4 versus 12 hours (P = .03), and preformed SSC 180 min/24 h versus 120 min/24 h for mothers in the OB unit (P = .02). SFR fathers were also more present, 8 versus 4 hours (P < .001), initiated SSC at 3 versus 40 hours (P = .004), and performed SSC 67 min/24 h versus 31 min/24 h (P = .05). SFR parents rated participation in medical rounds and emotional support higher than OB parents. Parental trust was rated higher by nurses in the OB unit (P = .02). SFR facilitated parent-infant closeness, parents' participation in medical rounds, and increased support from nurses.

  • 50. Tandberg, Bente Silnes
    et al.
    Frøslie, Kathrine Frey
    Markestad, Trond
    Flacking, Renée
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Grundt, Hege
    Moen, Atle
    Single-family room design in the neonatal intensive care unit did not improve growth2019In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 108, no 6, p. 1028-1035Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: The aim was to compare growth in very premature infants cared for in a single-family room and an open-bay unit. We recorded duration of parental presence and skin-to-skin contact as proxies for parental involvement in care of their infants.

    METHODS: We consecutively included infants with gestational ages 28+0 through 32+0 weeks at two hospitals in Norway, one single-family room unit (n=35) and one open-bay unit (n=42). Weight, length, and head circumference were followed from birth to four months after term date. Both units adhered to the same nutritional protocol and methods of recording events.

    RESULTS: The single-family room mothers spent a mean (standard deviation) of 111 (38) hours and the open bay mothers 33 (13) hours with their infants during the first week and 21 (5) versus 7 (3) hours per day later. The respective duration of skin-to-skin care was 21 (10) versus 12 (8) hours during the first week and 4.2 (2) versus 3.0 (2) hours per day later. The differences were similar, but less pronounced for the fathers. The growth trajectories did not differ between the groups.

    CONCLUSION: Single-family room care was associated with more parental involvement, but not with better growth. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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