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  • 1.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Discourse strategies and power roles in student-led distance learning2007In: Identity and Power in the Language Classroom, Umeå, 2007Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The assertion of identity and power via computer-mediated communication in the context of distance or web-based learning presents challenges to both teachers and students. When regular, face-to-face classroom interaction is replaced by online chat or group discussion forums, participants must avail themselves of new techniques and tactics for contributing to and progressing interaction, discussion, and learning. During student-only chat sessions, the absence of teacher-led, face-to-face classroom activities requires the students to assume leadership roles and responsibilities normally associated with the teacher. This situation raises the questions of who teaches and who learns; how students discursively negotiate power roles; and whether power emerges as a function of displayed expertise and knowledge or rather the use of authoritative language. In this descriptive study, we examine a corpus of task-based discussion logs among students of distance learning courses in English linguistics. The data reveal recurring discourse strategies used by students for the purpose of 1) negotiating the progression of the discussion sessions, 2) asserting and questioning knowledge, and 3) assuming or relinquishing power and responsibility. The data contribute to a better understanding of how working methods and materials can be tailored to distance learning students, and how such students can be afforded opportunities or even more effectively encouraged to assert their knowledge and authority.

  • 2.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    A Case Study of Student Experiences of Multi-modal Net-based Language Learning2019In: International Journal of Online Pedagogy and Course Design, ISSN 2155-6873, E-ISSN 2155-6881Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Adjuncts and VP structure2000In: UCL Working Papers in Linguistics, ISSN 0956-7194, Vol. 2, p. 202-227Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    An inquiry into Minimalist phrase structure1999Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis takes as its starting point the proposal in Kayne (1994) that all syntactic structures are underlyingly spec-head-complement, and that they are right-branching. I will investigate this proposal taking data from English degree constructions, namely result clauses and comparatives. A comparison will be made between these constructions and English VPs, on which the majority of the phrase structure debate in the literature has been based. The evidence for left-branching and for right-branching in VPs will be considered, and similar evidence sought for degree constructions. We will see that VPs have a mostly right-branching structure, although left-branching structures are required in restricted circumstances. Also reason and manner adjuncts are argued to be right-adjoined to the VP node, a conclusion that is re-inforced by considering the constituency of VP adjuncts and some PP sequences noted by Jackendoff (1973). In degree constructions too, we argue that both left-branching and right-branching structures are necessary. My conclusion will be that Kayne’s proposal is too strong, even though it is ideal from the perspective of a minimalist approach to syntax.

  • 5.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Authenticity and norms in online language2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Autonomy and Socialisation in Distance Education2008In: Higher Seminar in Language, Literature and Linguistics, Högskolan Dalarna, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Building and sustaining online communities of practice through language economy2015In: WorldCALL: Sustainability and Computer-Assisted Language Learning / [ed] Ana Gimeno Sanz, Mike Levy, Francoise Blin, David Barr, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2015, p. 176-189Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Clustering in Verb Phrases2003In: Proceedings from the 8th Nordic Conference on English Studies, 2003, p. 137-150Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Converging towards norms in L2 computer-mediated communication2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Cross-linguistic Variation in Result Clauses2008In: ESSE 9, Seminar S23, Modern English Syntax: Historical and Comparative Approaches, Århus, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Economisation as a Marker of an Online Community of Practice2013In: WorldCALL 2013: Programme and abstract book, 2013, p. 276-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to the lack of time for planning contributionsin online discourse, especially textchat,language is often economised. The strategies used have been considered by many authors,suchas,Werry (1996), Murray (2000), Lee (2002), and Lotherington and Xu (2004), among others,with both grammatical processeslike ellipsis and orthographical/morphological oneslikeclipping being discussed. Our presentation looksin more detail at these, and arguesthat they areevidence that an online community of practice (Lave andWenger 1991,Wenger 1998) hasformed. Our data comesfrom text chatlogsinvolving non-native speakers of English fromseminars on an MAintroduction to linguistics. One student is a speaker ofBangla and the restare speakers of Vietnamese. The chatlogs comesfrom student-only pre-seminars as well astheseminars with the teachers on the course.We will argue that ellipsis exhibitsfeatures ofinteraction like Intersubjectivity (Darhower 2002) and Greetings and Self-initiatedCorrection(Peterson 2009), and thus demonstrates a social cohesion among the students.Regardingorthographical/morphological economisation processeslike clipping, which we referto asreduced forms, we see evidence thatstudents are standardising the reduced formsthey use(Žegarac 1998).AsWenger (1998) argues, communities of practice involve a “sharedrepertoire”, and we argue thatreduced forms are part of thisrepertoire. Usersin onlinecommunities of practice use both ellipsis and reduced formsto create/maintain this community.As a result, they are also exhibiting social autonomy, a prerequisite for learner autonomy(Benson 2001).

  • 12.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Ellipsis and Interaction in an Academic Community of Practice2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Ellipsis as a marker of interaction in spoken discourse2013In: Research in Language, ISSN 2083-4616, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 251-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we discuss strategies for interaction in spoken discourse, focusing on ellipsis phenomena in English. The data comes from the VOICE corpus of English as a Lingua Franca, and we analyse education data in the form of seminar and workshop discussions, working group meetings, interviews and conversations. The functions ellipsis carries in the data are Intersubjectivity, where participants develop and maintain an understanding in discourse; Continuers, which are examples of back channel support; Correction, both self- and other-initiated; Repetition; and Comments, which are similar to Continuers but do not have a back channel support function. We see that the first of these, Intersubjectivity, is by far the most popular, followed by Repetitions and Comments. These results are explained as consequences of the nature of the texts themselves, as some are discussions of presentations and so can be expected to contain many Repetitions, for example. The speech event is also an important factor, as events with asymmetrical power relations like interviews do not contain so many Continuers. Our clear conclusion is that the use of ellipsis is a strong marker of interaction in spoken discourse.

  • 14.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Ellipsis as an Interaction Marker in Oral Discourse2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Exploration of Textual Interactions in CALL Learning Communities: Emerging Research and Opportunities2017Book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Functions of Ellipsis in L2 CMC Classroom Discourse2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Glocal English Communities: Setting Online Discourse Norms2014In: List of Abstracts for Conference Transcultural Identity Constructions in a Changing World Dalarna University, Sweden, April 2-4, 2014, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2014, p. 27-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Online communities are both global in character, with potential members from all parts of the world, but also local in that the community itself decides on its practices, hence the coining of the term glocal. These practices include the adoption of discourse norms. There are many norms that characterise discourses, and the one focused on here is the reduction of the written form of a lexical item, which characterizes informal more spoken forms of language. This paper presents evidence that reductions are negotiated locally by online communities. The community analysed consists of students on an online MA programme in English Linguistics who are all non-native speakers of English. These students have little experience of Internet communication even in their native languages, and so they are unlikely to be greatly aware of native speaker norms for online discourse. The paper shows that the students negotiate these norms within the group and that crucially their native English-speaking teachers do not have a strong role to play in the adoption of reductions. A number of examples of reductions are presented that are under negotiation by the students. The role of the teacher is analysed as well, and it is shown that 28 students are more likely to adopt a different reduction from the one the teachers use. Thus, this is further evidence that English is not owned by native speakers, but by non-native ones.

  • 18.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Individual Variation in Reduced Forms in Textchat2013In: 13th International Pragmatics Conference (New Delhi, 8-13 September 2013): Abstracts, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation focuses on the economisation of the English language in computer-mediated communication.Data is analysed from non-native English-speaking students on an online MA programme in English Linguisticsrun by a Swedish university. The data comprises text chatlogs from pre-seminar discussions involving thestudents only and seminars with their native English-speaking teachers on the introduction to English linguisticsthat is the first course on the programme. The students are mostly Vietnamese native speakers, apart from oneBangla speaker, and are inexperienced Internet users even in their native languages. Thus, they are unlikely tohave been aware of native speaker norms for Internet discourse. As a result, it is interesting to analyse thedevelopment of their language use in textchat.We analyse variations in students’ development of so-called reduced forms (reductions in orthography,morphology or formality of lexemes or phrases). The types of reduced forms in terms of word-class are analysedacross the introduction to linguistics course. Many more appear in more discussion-oriented topics like therelation between language and gender compared to more core theoretical linguistic topics like syntax. Thenumbers of functional and lexical categories is almost equal, with lexical categories slightly ahead. Regardingfunctional categories, interjections and pronouns are by far the most common. Given the oral and interactivenature of textchat, this is not surprising. Both variations regarding individual words for all students, andvariations in individual students’ reductions, are discussed. We find that in both cases students are regular intheir reductions, with similar processes appearing for individual words and for individual students, althoughthere is variation in the processes involved. Thus, this is evidence that textchat offers many opportunities forusers to individually economise their language.

  • 19.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Individual variation in reduction processes in L2 English academic textchat2018In: Ampersand, ISSN 2215-0390, Vol. 5, p. 18-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a study of individual variation in computer-mediated communication. Different reduction processes, which reduce the formality and usually the orthographical form of an expression, are used at varying frequencies by non-native speakers of English in academic textchat seminars. Such processes are classified into four categories: clipping, homophone respelling, phonetic respelling, and mixed processes. It is demonstrated, by comparing the relative frequencies at which these processes are used, that most individuals actually follow the norm of the speech community by having frequencies within ±1 standard deviation of the mean frequency of each process for the Cohort. There is, thus, very little true variation in the form of outlier individuals. This result supports research into individual variation which argues that individuals may vary in their linguistic behavior, but generally follow community norms.

  • 20.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Interaction and Ellipsis in Spoken and Written Discourse2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Interaction in Glocal Learner Communities Online2013In: Academic Exchange Quarterly, ISSN 1096-1453, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 53-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is argued here that ellipsis in English is evidence of interaction between non-native textchat users. Examples where users develop discourse, give comments on and encourage one another, repeat parts of discourse, and correct themselves or one another are presented. Not too surprisingly, since the data comes from academic seminars, developing discourse is the most common function. Furthermore, we argue this is evidence that they have formed a community of practice, which helps to promote learner autonomy.

  • 22.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Interaction Patterns in Computer-mediated Communication2014In: Next generation Learning conference: Book of abstracts, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2014, p. 40-40Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present research that the use of ellipsis in English is evidence that users are interacting. Ellipsis is a linguistic phenomenon where we can leave something unsaid and the context allows us to supply the missing part. For example, when someone asks us a question like “Where did you see him?”, we do not need to give a full sentence answer like “I saw him over there”. The context of the question allows us to just give the relevant information that is the answer to the question where, i.e. “over there”. Since ellipsis is contextual in this way, we can suppose that the phenomenon is interactive by nature.  Many strategies have been discussed in the literature which are used by speakers to interact, and this is an issue that is very much discussed in literature on computer-mediated communication. Peterson (2009) analyses data from textchats by Japanese learners of English and identified a series of strategies that show that interaction is taking place. These include back channel support (continuers), giving and seeking help, correction of self and others, and off-task discussion. Darhower (2002) discusses greeting/leave-taking, intersubjectivity (maintaining and developing a discourse topic) and use of a speaker’s first language (if not already the main language of the discourse). Repetition is discussed by Cogo (2009: 260), Suvimiitty (2012, chapter 7) and Mauranen (2012: chapter 7) in discourses involving speakers of English as a Lingua Franca. These strategies suggest that the learners are creating and maintaining social cohesion, and lead to the formation of discourse communities.  We analyse data from textchat logs that come from my own corpus of seminar discussions from an online MA programme in English Linguistics, also involving non-native speakers of English. We show that the intersubjectivity, repetition, continuer and correction functions can be found in our data set, and we propose one more: comments. Intersubjectivity is by far the most common function as we might expect from seminar discussions, while continuers and corrections are very rare. The use of these functions clearly marks that students are interacting as members of a discourse community. 

  • 23.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Interaction Strategies in Ellipsis Contexts2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Is morphology really syntax?2005In: Higher Seminar in Linguistics, Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, Sweden, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Language Economy and Learner Autonomy in Computer-mediated Communication2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I discuss two types of language economy in Internet textchat discourse, ellipsis and reduced forms (such as clippings and informal phoneticised spellings). These are markers that a community of practice is being or has been formed. The data I analyse is textchat data from seminars with students on an MA in English Linguistics. Reduced forms are expected in Internet discourse and function as an in-group marker that the user is an experienced Internet user. I present additional evidence that learners are agents of the process of standardising the forms the community uses. Ellipsis is shown to function as a marker of interaction, and therefore that the community is a cohesive group. I show that the major functions of interaction that have been presented in the literature can be seen in ellipsis contexts. We can therefore conclude that both these types of reduced language are also evidence of a social autonomy that the learners have which is seen as a prerequisite for learner autonomy.

  • 26.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Language Economy as a Marker of a Community of Practice2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Language Economy as Evidence of Learner Autonomy2013In: Academic Exchange Quarterly, ISSN 1096-1453, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 79-84Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We argue here that using an economised language in computer-mediated communication is evidence that learners are autonomous. Data is analysed from text chatlogs in English, and we see evidence of such language in reduced forms like clippings. The use of these forms is evidence that a community of practice has formed. Crucially, also, the participants are leaders in the setting of reduced forms as discourse norms. Thus, we conclude that the learners are autonomous agents in their language learning.

  • 28.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Language Economy in CMC: Presentation of an Ongoing Research Project2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 29.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Language Economy in Computer-mediated Communication: Learner Autonomy in a Community of Practice2013In: Computer-assisted foreign language teaching and learning: Technological advances / [ed] Bin Zou, Minjie Xing, Catherine Xiang, Yuping Wang, Mingyu Sun, Hershey, Pa.: IGI Global, 2013, p. 73-89Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents an analysis of economised language in textchat data from non-native English-speaking students on an MA programme in English Linguistics. Previous research by the author demonstrated that forms clipped or otherwise reduced from their full version can be considered evidence that an Internet community of practice has formed. We argue here that this implies that the learners are exhibiting autonomy, and we also demonstrate that the same can be concluded for ellipsis. The functions of ellipsis are identified, which demonstrates that students are interacting, and therefore are at least in the process of forming a social learning community.

  • 30.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Marking community identity through languaging: Authentic norms in TELL2018In: Cross-Cultural Perspectives on Technology-Enhanced Language Learning / [ed] Dara Taffazoli, IGI Global, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter takes up the issue of authenticity in language pedagogy. Traditional views of authenticity take the native speaker to be the primary authority for linguistic norms. Written standard language is especially highly valued here. It is argued herein that TELL environments are equally valid as learning environments, and that students can use the freedom they provide to develop their own locally negotiated cultural and linguistic norms. Evidence is provided that students on a net-based MA program develop their own norms for reducing language, and use them and other means to mark membership of a local TELL community. Thus, TELL is a rich and authentic environment for learners of English to become what is referred to as "language practitioners".

  • 31.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Marking Online Community Membership: The Pragmatics of Stance-taking2018In: Further Advances in Pragmatics and Philosophy Part 2: Theories and Applications / [ed] Alessandro Capone, Marco Carapezza, Lo Piparo, Springer Publishing Company, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Data from academic seminars conducted through Skype textchat is analysed in this chapter, and the focus is on examples of how users mark community membership. Membership is marked explicitly by using pronominals and the metonymic use of the seminar group name. It is also marked implicitly by using reduced forms, which are stereotypical examples of a textchat speech style. I argue that these are markers of stance-taking, where community membership is recovered pragmatically as a weak implicature. Dis-alignment with the community is also seen, as individuals can also implicate their independence as setters of linguistic norms

  • 32.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Native and Non-native Norms in CALL2014In: Research challenges in CALL, proceedings CALL 2014: Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on CALL / [ed] Jozef Colpaert, Ann Aerts, Margret Oberhofer, University of Antwerp , 2014, p. 354-359Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Negotiating local norms in online communication2018In: Encyclopaedia of Information Science and Technology / [ed] Mehdi Khosrow-Pour, IGI Global, 2018, 4, p. 1217-1225Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 34.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Norm-setting on Online Non-native Communities2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Processes and variations in language economisation2015In: Ampersand, ISSN 2215-0390, Vol. 2, p. 72-82Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the processes of reducing language in textchats produced by non-native speakers of English. We propose that forms are reduced because of their high frequency and because of the discourse context. A wide variety of processes are attested in the literature, and we find different forms of clippings in our data, including mixtures of different clippings, homophone respellings, phonetic respellings including informal oral forms, initialisms (but no acronyms), and mixtures of clipping together with homophone and phonetic respellings. Clippings were the most frequent process (especially back-clippings and initialisms), followed by homophone respellings. There were different ways of metalinguistically marking reduction, but capitalisation was by far the most frequent. There is much individual variation in the frequencies of the different processes, although most were within normal distribution. The fact that nonnative speakers seem to generally follow reduction patterns of native speakers suggests that reduction is a universal process.

  • 36.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Reduced Forms in Academic Computer-mediated Communication2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I present a study of the use of reduced forms by students studying on a web-based MA programme. By reduced form, I mean that word-forms have been reduced in some way, for example in clipped forms like plane instead of airplane; but also the formality level can be reduced, for example with more phonetic spellings like woz instead of was. White (2011, forthcoming ) demonstrates that these learners who are novice Internet users in English reduced word forms because of their saliency in discourse and frequency of use. In this new study, I look at the development of reduced forms over an introductory course in English linguistics, seeing if particular forms have become standardised, see Žegarac (1998) for discussion of this term. What the standardisation process does is argued by White (forthcoming) to mark that a discourse community has formed. Thus, by using reduced forms, students are marking that they belong to a community of practice (Lave and Wenger 1991, Wenger 1998). We look at two types of examples. One are topic-specific items where there is a process of agreement among participants on a particular reduced form within a particular type of discourse. These are in fact a very local process of the kind argued to be central to the formation of communities of practice (Wenger 1998), and indeed can be local to particular topics, as the same reduced form can be related to different full forms (D referring to derivation in a discussion of morphology, or to the name of an individual Damian in a discussion of language and gender). Then there are more general items that are used in a wider range of topics and discourses. All these items can be subject to standardisation, we argue, although some items require a longer time to be standardised than is available during the short course analysed here. Very common discourse markers like please and thanks have been subject to standardisation, while less common ones like question have not, with competing forms still available.

  • 37.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Reduced forms in chat language2011In: ASLA, Högskolan Dalarna, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 38.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Result clauses and the structure of Degree Phrases1997In: UCL Working Papers in Linguistics, ISSN 0956-7194, Vol. 9, p. 315-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    I am concerned here with the structure of Degree Phrases which introduce Result clauses. After demonstrating that degree words select these clauses, I look at some previous proposals regarding this structure. I consider Abney's (1987) account, a extraposition-based version using Jackendoff's (1977) work, and finally Baltin (1987), which involves both selection and extraposition. Next, I introduce my proposal, that functional categories can project shells, and analyse Degree Phrases in this way. Lastly, I propose a possible semantic analysis, which is intended to demonstrate that my syntactic account is superior to the others.

  • 39.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Result clauses and their positioning2005In: Proceedings of the 7th Seoul International Conference on Generative Grammar, Seoul, 2005, p. 315-328Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Review 15.3455 of Radford, Andrew (2004) English Syntax: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press2004In: Communications: the European Journal of Communication Research, ISSN 0341-2059, E-ISSN 1613-4087Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 41.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Review number 14.1360 of Alexiadou, A., E. Anagnostopoulou, S. Barbiers and H.-M. Gärtner (2002) Dimensions of movement: From features to remnants. John Benjamins. Amsterdam2003In: The Linguist ListArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 42.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Review number 14.3181 of Adger, D. (2003) Core Syntax: A Minimalist Approach. Oxford University Press. Oxford2003In: The Linguist ListArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 43.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Review number 14.525 of Chomsky, Noam (2002) On Nature and Language2003In: The Linguist ListArticle in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Review of Aronoff, M. and K. Fudeman. (2005). What is Morphology? Oxford: Blackwell Publishing2005In: The Linguist ListArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Review of Duncker & Perregaard (2017) Creativity and Continuity: Perspectives on the Dynamics of Language Conventionalisation. Copenhagen: U Press.2017In: Danske studier, ISSN 0106-4525, E-ISSN 2246-8323, p. 166-176Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 46.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Review of Plag, I., M. Braun, S. Lappe and M. Schramm (2007) Introduction to English Linguistics. Mouton de Gruyter: Berlin/New York.2008In: The Linguist List, Vol. 19, no 213Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Standardisation of reduced forms2011In: Higher Seminar in Languages and Culture, Falun, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Standardisation of reduced forms in English in an academic community of practice2014In: Pragmatics and Society, ISSN 1878-9714, E-ISSN 1878-9722, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 105-127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The process of standardising reduced forms in English, such as clippings and informal forms, used in academic chat discourse is the focus of this article. Textchat data from an introductory MA linguistics course run by a university in Sweden involving non-native English-speaking students and their native English-speaking teachers is analysed to identify if any forms are standardised. Topic-specific forms are seen to be standardised as much as are high frequency forms, although few have been standardised. It is the students above all who lead the process, and the teachers do not have much influence even if they use a different reduction.

  • 49.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Syntactic autonomy and result clauses2004In: Working Papers in Linguistics / [ed] Heinat, Fredrik; Manninen, Satu, The Department of English in Lund , 2004, Vol. 4, p. 93-120Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    White, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Syntactic autonomy and result clauses2004In: The Department of English in Lund: Working Papers in Linguistics, ISSN 1650-691X, Vol. 4, p. 93-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I look at whether the syntactic properties of the result clause construction in English can be predicted from its semantic properties. I adopt the semantics of Meier (2000, 2003) which treats the construction as having a hidden conditional meaning. The structure she proposes makes predictions for the syntactic properties of result clauses that are not fulfilled, in that different degree words are associated with different structures. I propose structures that are not strictly compositional.

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