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  • 1.
    Allard, Karin
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Translanguaging and social justice: The case of education for immigrant persons who are deaf or hard of hearing2017In: New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education / [ed] Paulsrud, BethAnne; Rosén, Jenny; Straszer, Boglárka; Wedin, Åsa, London: Multilingual Matters, 2017, p. 90-107Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2. Moreno Herrera, Lazaro
    et al.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Bilingualism and bilingual education in a complex context2010In: Language, Culture and Curriculum, ISSN 0790-8318, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 235-249Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 3. Moreno Herrera, Lázaro
    et al.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Re-thinking bilingualism: challenges of multilingualism and communication in classroom settings2010In: Language, Culture and Curriculum, ISSN 0790-8318, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 171-171Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English. Stockholm University.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Epilogue2017In: New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education / [ed] BethAnne Paulsrud, Jenny Rosén, Boglárka Straszer, Åsa Wedin, Multilingual Matters, 2017, p. 226-230Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English. Centre for Research on Bilingualism, Stockholm University.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Introduktion2018In: Transspråkande i svenska utbildningssammanhang / [ed] BethAnne Paulsrud, Jenny Rosén, Boglárka Straszer, Åsa Wedin, Lund: Studentlitteratur AB, 2018, p. 11-26Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Rosén, JennyDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.Straszer, BoglárkaDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.Wedin, ÅsaDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    New Perspectives on Translanguaging and Education2017Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Perspectives on translanguaging in education2017In: New perspectives on translanguaging and education / [ed] Åsa Wedin, Jenny Rosén, BethAnne Paulsrud, and Boglárka Straszer, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2017, p. 10-19Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Paulsrud, BethAnne
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English. Centre for Research on Bilingualism, Stockholm University.
    Rosén, JennyDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.Straszer, BoglárkaDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.Wedin, ÅsaDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Transspråkande i svenska utbildningssammanhang2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Rosén, Jenny
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language. Högskolan Dalarna.
    Transspråkande i studiehandledning som pedagogisk praktik2017In: Lisetten, ISSN 1101-5128, no 1, p. 16-19Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Rosén, Jenny
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Att representera mångfalden: Förskollärarstudenters narrativ om representativitet, delaktighet och professionalitet2018In: Lärarprofession i en föränderlig tid / [ed] Eva Reimers, Martin Harling, Ingrid Henning Loeb, Göteborgs universitet, 2018Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Rosén, Jenny
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Educational Work.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Klassrumsinteraktion och flerspråkighet: ett kritiskt perspektiv2015Book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Rosén, Jenny
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Same but different. Negotiating diversity in Swedish pre-school teacher training2018In: Journal of Multicultural Discourses, ISSN 1744-7143, E-ISSN 1747-6615, ISSN 1744-7143Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to migration, Swedish pre-schools are linguistically and culturally diverse settings where approximately one in five children is bi-/multilingual. Hence, pre-school teachers work in a diverse landscape in which they are expected to support the multilingual and multicultural development of the children. The aim of this article is to analyze the discourses of diversity in Swedish pre-school teacher training and, more specifically, how students are positioned and position themselves in relation to such discourses. The article takes its point of departure in an ethnographic four-year project that studied a group of students recruited to the pre-school teacher training by a municipality because of their migration background. The material analyzed consists of interviews and observations during the four years that the students participated in the program. Using the framework of nexus analysis, it reveals an ambivalence in attitudes in relation to diversity and in the positioning of certain students as other. Due to their historical bodies, the students are expected to add value to the pre-school teacher training program, but at the same time, they are expected to perform like everyone else in the program, reproducing a discourse of diversity as a positive asset.

  • 13.
    Rosén, Jenny
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Translation, tuition and translanguaging. Perspectives on study guidance in the mother tongue in the Swedish compulsory school2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Schmidt, Catarina
    et al.
    Högskolan i Jönköping.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Elevers olika textrepertoarer och lärandepotentialen i dessa2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Imagining the homeland – mother tongue tuition as transnational spaces2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Sadig, Nigar
    Spaces for translanguaging in the discourse of mother tongue tuition2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Svensson, Gudrun
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitet.
    Rosén, Jenny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Straszer, Boglárka
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Greppa flerspråkigheten: en resurs i lärande och undervisning2018Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vikten av att elevers språkliga kunskaper och erfarenheter ses som tillgångar för lärande i skolan är den röda tråden för den här kunskapsöversikten.

  • 18.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    A restricted curriculum for second language learners: a self-fulfilling teacher strategy?2010In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 171-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus of this article is on relations between classroom interaction, curricular knowledge and student engagement in diverse classrooms. It is based on a study with ethnographic perspective in which two primary school classes in Sweden were followed for three years. The analysis draws on Halliday's Systemic Functional Linguistics. The results indicate that language use in the classrooms is on a basic everyday level and that high teacher control results in low-demanding tasks and low engagement among students. Interaction in the classrooms mainly consists of short talk-turns with fragmented language, frequent repairs and interruptions, while writing and reading consists of single words and short sentences. Although the classroom atmosphere is friendly and inclusive, second language students are denied necessary opportunities to develop curricular knowledge and Swedish at the advanced level, which they will need higher up in the school system. The restricted curriculum that these students are offered in school thus restricts their opportunities to school success. Thus, I argue for a more reflective and critical approach regarding language use in classrooms.

  • 19.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Arbete med identitetstexter: Flerspråkigt skrivande för identitetsförhandling och engagemang2017In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 1, p. 45-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In applied linguistics and critical theory, identity has become an important theoretical and analytical concept. Work with multilingual identity texts has been developed in Canada by teachers and researchers in cooperation to creating opportunities for students’ identity development academically, intellectually and personally. The focus in the article is on student engagement and negotiation of identities. Results are presented from an ethnographically inspired action research where students in grade four where inspired to use their multiple language resources. Through participant observation and interviews material was created during the project. Students’ talk of how they navigate in multilingual environments outside school and of how they try to extend their linguistic repertoire by learning from each other challenge traditional views of mother tongue and home country. The work with identity texts made students’ varied and complex linguistic resources visible while opportunities to negotiate identities were offered, creating space for changing roles and for discussions about emotions related to language.  The project showed that changes in classroom practices by including different languages put high demands on teachers, on development of the cooperation with mother tongue teachers, study guidance assistants in the mother tongue and parents, and on organizational support. The multilingual writing increased students’ engagement while also increasing linguistic awareness among students and teachers.

     

  • 20.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Att läsa och skriva på sitt andraspråk2010In: Flerspråkighet, identitet och lärande: skola i ett föränderligt samhälle, Studentlitteratur , 2010, p. 173-192Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Att stötta och utveckla muntlighet i klassrummet2016Other (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Bedöma eller döma?: Språktest och lästest i grundskolans tidigare år2010In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, Vol. 15, p. 102-114Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Call-response interaction in Karagwe, Tanzania2004In: The 25th Ethnography Forum at the University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Classroom interaction: Potential or problem? : The Case of Karagwe2010In: International Journal of Educational Development, ISSN 0738-0593, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 145-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper discusses interactional patterns in classrooms in primary school in rural Tanzania, based on an ethnographic study on literacy practices. The paper argues that the official policy of Swahili-only in primary school, together with the huge gap between high expectations on educational outcome and lack of resources, have resulted in the creation of safety strategies among pupils and teachers. These safety strategies include interactional patterns that also constitute a hindrance for students’ learning. However, I claim that these interactional patterns could constitute a potential for educational development, if research findings from bilingual education were taken into account.

  • 25.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Elevers olika textreportarer och lärandepotentialen i detta2014In: Nordisk konferens: Forskning och läsning och skrivning, Falun, 21-22 maj 2014: Abstracts / [ed] Tarja Alatalo, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Genom den snabba utvecklingen av informationsteknologier och deras olika modaliteter har den textrepertoar som barn möter i sin vardag kommit att kraftigt expanderas. Behovet av att sålla, tolka och förstå budskap och innehåll i olika slags texter har kanske aldrig varit större. I detta paper kommer resultat från ett mindre klassrumsbaserat projekt att redovisas. Projektet genomfördes i ett flerspråkigt sammanhang i årskurs två. Initialt inventerades vilka texter barnen möter och är intresserade av på sin fritid. Utifrån denna inventering stimulerade vi sedan en textproduktion runt karaktärerna i dessa företrädesvis populärkulturella texter. I vårt bidrag diskuterar vi resultatet ur barns och lärares perspektiv samt i relation till nuvarande nationella styrdokument och Barnkonventionen. I presentationen fokuseras vidare aspekter gällande den möjliga lärandepotentialen i texter hämtade från barns sociala världar samt villkor för barns medborgarskap i relation till kodning, funktionell användning, meningsskapande och kritisk granskning av texter.

  • 26.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Etnografisk lingvistik i utbildningsforskning2006In: Nordand: nordisk tidsskrift for andrespråksforskning, ISSN 0809-9227, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 73-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel argumenterar jag för att etnografisk lingvistik erbjuder ett perspektiv att studera undervisning i sitt sociala och kulturella sammanhang. Med exempel från min skolforskning i Karagwe, Tanzania, visar jag hur ett fenomen i klassrumsinteraktionen har negativ effekt på elevernas inlärande genom att dölja deras verkliga kunskap, eller brist på kunskap, för både lärarna och dem själva. Samtidigt kan jag visa, tack vare det holistiska perspektivet, att detta interaktionsmönster utgör en positiv utvecklingspotential eftersom det också kan ha funktioner som är relevanta för skolan, som att hjälpa eleverna att fokusera på det läraren säger och att aktivera dem. Utifrån detta argumenterar jag för att västerländska forskare bör inta en ödmjuk inställning och ha en beredskap att se traditionella undervisningsmetoder som tillgångar och inte som problem. Det som ur västerländskt perspektiv kan förefalla ha negativ effekt på undervisningen, kan visa sig ha relevans i sitt sammanhang. Jag visar också på frågor inom andraspråksundervisningen i Norden som skulle kunna besvaras med hjälp av etnografi.

  • 27.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Identitetsförhandling och skrivande: Flerspråkighet som resurs i klassrummet2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Identitet är ett användbart begrepp vid analys av språk i klassrum (Ivanič 1998, 2004, Gee 2000), som när elever skriver flerspråkiga identitetstexter (Cummins 2000). Gee hänvisar till identitet som “being recognized as a certain “kind of person”, medan Ivanič talar om en önskan om att “appear as somebody”. Vikten av att använda undervisningsformer som inkluderar elevers flerspråkiga resurser har betonats av många forskare (Cummins 2000, García 2009 m.fl.) och i denna presentation kommer resultat att presenteras från ett aktionsforskningsprojekt där elever i år fyra och fem har stimulerats att använda sina varierade språkliga resurser i skrivande i klassrummet.  Fokus i presentationen kommer att vara på vilka möjligheter till identitetsförhandling som erbjuds eleverna i samband med det flerspråkiga skrivandet. Projektet planerades i samarbete med verksamma lärare som sedan genomförde själva undervisningen. Material skapades genom deltagande observationer och intervjuer.

     

    I intervjuer beskriver eleverna hur de navigerar i flerspråkiga sammanhang utanför skolan och att de aktivt försöker utvidga sina språkliga repertoarer genom att lära av andra och genom användning av digitala medier. I presentationen kommer exempel att visas på hur det flerspråkiga skrivandet skapar vidgade möjligheter för identitetsförhandling och skapade ökad medvetenhet hos lärarna om elevers varierade lingvistiska kompetens samtidigt som den språkliga medvetenheten såväl hos elever som lärare ökade.

  • 28.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Klassrumsinteraktion i de tidiga skolåren: flerspråkiga elever i skolans språkliga vardag2011In: Nordic Studies in Education, ISSN 1891-5914, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 210-225Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Classroom interaction is particularly important for those students who learn school knowledge in a second language. In this article two episodes of whole class teaching in pre-school and standard one are analyzed. The analysis shows the importance of making teachers aware of interactional patterns in classrooms. Although knowledge was presented clearly and concretely and teachers used routines that made norms explicit, inconsistencies in interactional patterns made the role of the teacher stand out as unclear. Whole class teaching of this type does not provide students with such linguistic and intellectual demands that are necessary for their language development.

  • 29.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Language attitudes and schooled education: the case of Karagwe2011In: North-south contributions to African languages, Cologne: Rüdiger Köppe Verlag, 2011, p. 187-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 30.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Language Attitudes and Schooled education: The Case of Karagwe2011In: North-South Contributions to African Languages / [ed] Christina Thornell & Karsten Legère, Köln: Rűdiger Köppe Verlag , 2011, p. 95-118Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Language ideologies and Schooled Education in Rural Tanzania: The Case of Karagwe2005In: International Journal of Bilingual Education and Bilingualism, ISSN 1367-0050, E-ISSN 1747-7522, Vol. 8, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I argue that language policies for education have effects on pupils’ educational possibilities. With the case of Karagwe district in Tanzania I have found that the case of “Swahili only” in primary school education favours the small minority of the children that live in a context where Swahili is used. This leads to inequality in pupils’ chances in education and to a low level of achievement of academic content in schools. This also promote the developing and use of safety strategies among teachers and pupils that hide failure and prevent pupils’ learning.

  • 32.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Language in rural primary schools in multilingual settings: the case of Karagwe in Tanzania2011In: Urban and rural schools: problems, solutions and progress / [ed] Danielle E Lynch, Nova Science Publishers , 2011, p. 165-180Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Letters, authority and secrecy: The case of Karagwe in Tanzania2013In: Language and Education, ISSN 0950-0782, E-ISSN 1747-7581, Vol. 27, no 1, p. 44-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to show how letters, as a genre of literacy, are used in Karagwe in Tanzania, in relation to authority and secrecy. It is shown that literacy, in the form of letters, plays an important role in the negotiation of authority. Authorities as well as ordinary people use letters according to official norms to claim or manifest authority, while grassroots forms of literacy, dominated forms, are used to resist authorities. Through secret messages and letters people find opportunities to resist that are less dangerous than open rebellion, although the effects may be limited because of the secrecy. It is also shown how children are socialized into this pattern of secrecies through literacy as they are used as messengers. When delivering secret letters and messages, they may be said to exercise a passive voice through literacy.

  • 34.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Literacy and power: the cases of Tanzania and Rwanda2008In: International Journal of Educational Development, ISSN 0738-0593, E-ISSN 1873-4871, Vol. 28, no 6, p. 754-763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper it is claimed that the relation between literacy and power is complex. What people do with literacy has effects on power relations but literacy is not democratic per se. Drawing from two cases from Tanzania and Rwanda it is argued that plans for adult education and literacy education should consider the perspectives of target groups. The use of the notion of literacy practices enables the study of situated literacies and of the ways people relate to literacy. This gives planners tools to take the views of ordinary members of the public into account which is a prerequisite for literacy plans that claim to have democratic effects.

  • 35.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Literacy and relevant schooling in rural Tanzania2003In: Multiliteracies and the Contact Zone, Ghent, Belgien, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most fundamental skill to be learnt in school is literacy. In my study I focus on literacy as a socially and culturally situated practise. This perspective on literacy has been mainly developed within an ethnographic research framework, both to contest and to complement the more traditional psychological and cognitive approaches which have been prominent in educational contexts. Researchers such as Sylvia Scribner and Michael Cole (1981), Shirley Brice Heath (1983), Bambi Schieffelin and Elinor Ochs (1986), Caroline Liberg (1990), Birgitta Kullberg (1991), Ingvar Lundberg (1991), Don Kulick and Christopher Stroud (1993), Brian Street (1993, 1995) and David Barton (2001) have opposed the traditional views of literacy as an autonomous phenomenon consisting of a number of separate skills which may be studied separately, outside their contexts. Ethnographic methods provide the researcher with tools to create an understanding of how people perceive a phenomenon, such as literacy or education. Ethnographic research carried out by among others Shirley Brice Heath (1983), 1986), Karen Ann Watson-Gegeo (1992),Bambi Schieffelin and Elinor Ochs (2001 and Susan Philips (2001) has shown the importance of connection in education between what happens in homes, in school and the society. In my research I focus on literacy practices in homes, in primary school and in the community in Karagwe district in the north-west of Tanzania. My aim is to find ways to bridge between what happens in school and the society to make literacy education more relevant and efficient If schooling can be made to build more on pupils pre-knowledge, such as language skills, communicative patterns, ways of learning and perspectives on knowledge, literacy education may become more efficient and if literacy education can be better linked to skills pupils will need in their lives, schooling may become more relevant. The study is a longitudinal one based on ethnographic methods. By using different techniques, such as participant observation, interviewing, logbooks and written artefacts in settings such as homes, schools, marketplaces, adult education, women groups and churches I try to build an understanding of how people make sense of literacy. As a part of the study I have studied interactional patterns. Child-child and adult-child interaction in homes has been compared with teacher-pupil interaction in classrooms and with adult-adult interaction in the community. Preliminary results from my studies indicate that the discrepancy between literacy practices in school and homes in Karagwe, and also discrepancies in language use, communicative patterns and perspectives on learning, constitute important obstacles for pupils’ literacy acquisition and that some important literacy skills that pupils will need in their lives are neither taught nor learned at school. The study also indicate that much of pupils’ literacy acquisition may today take place outside the school context. References Barton, D. 2001: Literacy in everyday contexts. In: Verhoeven, L. and Snow, C. 2001: Literacy and Motivation. Reading Engagement in Individuals and Groups. London: Lawrence Erlbaum associates, Publishers. . Heath, S. B.1983: Ways with words: language, life and work in communities and classrooms. Cambridge England: Cambridge University Press. Heath, S. B. 1986: What no bedtimestory means, narrative skills at home and in school. In: Schieffelin, B. B. & Ochs, E.1986: Language socialization across cultures. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Kullberg, B. 1991: Learning to learn to read. Göteborg: Acta Universitatis Gothburgensis. Kulick, D. and Stroud, C. 1993: Conceptions and uses of literacy in a Papua New Guinean village. In: Street, E. (ed) 1993: Crosscultural approaches to literacy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Liberg, C. 1990: Learning to read and write. Uppsala: Uppsala University. Lundberg, I. 1991: Svensk läsundervisning i ett internationellt perspektiv. Stavanger: Center for Reading Research. Philips, S. 2001: Competence: Warm Springs Children in Community and Classroom. In: Duranti, A (ed) 2001: Linguistic Anthropology. A Reader. Malden, Mass. : Blackwell Publishers Schieffelin, B. B. and Ochs, E. (eds) 1986: Language socialisation across cultures. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Schieffelin, B. B. and Ochs, E. 2001: XXX In: Duranti, A (ed) 2001: Linguistic Anthropology. A Reader. Malden, Mass. : Blackwell Publishers. Scribner, S. and Cole, M. 1981: The Psychology of Literacy. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Street, B. (ed)1993: Cross-cultural approaches to literacy. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Street, B. 1995: Social Literacies Critical Approaches to Literacy in Development, Ethnography and Education New York: Longman Publishing. Watson-Gegeo, K. A. 1992: Thick explanation in the ethnographic study of child socialization: A longitudinal study of the problem of schooling for Kwara’ae (Solomon Islands) children. New Directions for Child Development 58, 51-66.

  • 36.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Literacy in negotiating, constructing and manifesting identities: The case of migrant unaccompanied asylum-seeking children in Sweden2012In: Literacy Practices in Transition / [ed] Anne Pitkänen-Huhta; Lars Holm, Bristol: Multilingual Matters, 2012, p. 55-75Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Literacy Practices in and out of School in Karagwe: The case of primary school literacy education in rural Tanzania2004Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study has investigated the question of relation between literacy practices in and out of school in rural Tanzania. By using the perspective of linguistic anthropology, literacy practices in five villages in Karagwe district in the northwest of Tanzania have been analysed. The outcome may be used as a basis for educational planning and literacy programs. The analysis has revealed an intimate relation between language, literacy and power. In Karagwe, traditional élites have drawn on literacy to construct and reconstruct their authority, while new élites, such as individual women and some young people have been able to use literacy as one tool to get access to power. The study has also revealed a high level of bilingualism and a high emphasis on education in the area, which prove a potential for future education in the area. At the same time discontinuity in language use, mainly caused by stigmatisation of what is perceived as local and traditional, such as the mother-tongue of the majority of the children, and the high status accrued to all that is perceived as Western, has turned out to constitute a great obstacle for pupils’ learning. The use of ethnographic perspectives has enabled comparisons between interactional patterns in schools and outside school. This has revealed communicative patterns in school that hinder pupils’ learning, while the same patterns in other discourses reinforce learning. By using ethnography, relations between explicit and implicit language ideologies and their impact in educational contexts may be revealed. This knowledge may then be used to make educational plans and literacy programmes more relevant and efficient, not only in poor post-colonial settings such as Tanzania, but also elsewhere, such as in Western settings.

  • 38.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Literacy practices in rural Tanzania: the case of Karagwe2006In: Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, ISSN 0143-4632, E-ISSN 1747-7557, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 225-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article I argue that literacy, as an aspect of language, is closely related to power. With the example of Karagwe, I show that different literacy practices relate differently to power. In Karagwe dominant literacies, that are officially prescribed and standardised, have a main function to sort people and maintain authority. As they are spread through schools, schooled literacies are very much geared at sorting pupils. Dominated literacy practises often have decorative and cultural functions and often do not follow standard norms, for example in spelling. In some cases there are local norms. Dominated literacies are more or less stigmatised. A third group of literacy practises, semi-dominant, are spread mainly through seminars and development agencies, such as different non-governmental organisations. These literacy practises, that are important for the improvement of daily life and economic conditions, focus both on formal features and on the content in the texts. I argue that literacy in Karagwe is an important tool for maintaining authority while it is at the same time a tool for people to contest and resist authority.

  • 39.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Litteracitetspraxis - ett begrepp som öppnar för skolutveckling2006In: Svensklärarföreningens årsskrift, ISSN 0349-0246, p. 152-160Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Lära sig läsa och skriva på flera språk2014In: ASLA, 8-9 maj 2014: Abstracts, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Inom ramen för ett forskningsprojekt om flerspråkiga elever och lärande vid en skola där övervägande del av eleverna har flerspråkig bakgrund och en stor andel av eleverna är nyanlända till Sverige har en studie genomförts av ett temaarbete i tre klasser i år ett. I temaarbetet stimulerades elevernas olika språkliga resurser att genom läsande och skrivande av sagor på de olika språk som fanns representerade i klasserna. Föräldrar, modersmålslärare och studiehandledare uppmuntrades att bidra med kunskap i de olika språk som fanns i barnens hem. Presentationen kommer att presentera preliminära resultat som framkommit genom deltagande observation och intervjuer med lärare, elever och föräldrar som deltagit.

  • 41.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Medium of instruction and classroom interaction: The case of Karagwe2013In: Themes in Modern African History and Culture: Festschrift for Tekeste Negash / [ed] Berge, Lars & Taddia, Irma, Italy: Liberiauniverzitaria , 2013, p. 263-278Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Monologen som en resurs i klassrummet2009In: Pedagogisk forskning i Sverige, ISSN 1401-6788, Vol. 13, p. 241-256Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Monologen som resurs för språkutveckling i klassrummet i förskola och skola2009In: ASLAs skriftserie, ISSN 1100-5629, Vol. 22, p. 57-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I denna artikel diskuteras elevers utveckling av textuell kompetens i förskola och skolans tidigare år som särskilt betydelsefull för den tidiga skriftspråksutvecklingen. Artikeln bygger på en etnografiskt inriktad studie i år f–6 med fokus på andraspråkselever. I artikeln betonas vikten av att elever erbjuds tillfälle att möta och själva uttrycka längre sammanhängande tankar i tal och skrift. Vidare argumenteras för att satsning på elevers utveckling av läs- och skrivförmåga i de tidigare åren inte är tillräcklig utan att även den allmänna språkutvecklingen måste prioriteras. Detta gäller i synnerhet de elever som inte möter skolans språk utanför skolan.

  • 44.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Narration in Swedish pre- and primary school: a recourse for language development and multilingualism2010In: Language, Culture and Curriculum, ISSN 0790-8318, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 219-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased immigration in Europe and worldwide has led to more pre- and primary school students being educated through the medium of a second language, and there is considerable research, much of it coming from Australia, to suggest that in order to cope with this situation, children will need to begin to acquire, from their earliest years in pre-school, a variety of knowledge-based language skills that will be sufficient to carry them through the subject-based education they will encounter in their subsequent schooling. This is particularly important for L2-students who are less likely to meet academic language outside the school. In this paper, based on transcripts of oral interactions in the classroom, it is argued that conversational and story-telling skills, oral and written, provide a rich environment for the development of academic school language, while at the same time promoting and making good use of the cultural diversity that is increasingly a feature of pre-primary and primary classrooms.

  • 45.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Non-challenging education and teacher control as factors for marginalization of students in diverse settings2015In: International Electronic Journal of Elementary Education, ISSN 1307-9298, Vol. 07, no 2, p. 169-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article discusses teachers’ attitudes towards immigrant students in poor settings and the effect these attitudes have on organization of education on classroom level. It draws on results from two ethnographic studies where some primary school classes in Sweden were followed with participant observation and interviews as main research methods. The article focuses on classroom activities and teachers’ attitudes towards immigrant students and students with low socio-economic status. In the article is argued for the importance of presenting students in poor settings with demanding tasks and challenging education. In these cases, intellectually undemanding tasks in combination with little room for students’ own initiatives resulted in low enthusiasm among students regarding schoolwork and accordingly low learning, while classroom work that demanded active involvement by students in combination with high level of students’ influence on what took place in classrooms resulted in high level of students’ engagement and high outcome.

  • 46.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    PANA V: Evaluation of a Literacy Project2007Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    PANA V Evaluation of a Literacy Project SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS This evaluation set out to explore the impact of the literacy work carried out through PANA V. It focussed on clarifying effects such as empowerment and poverty reduction in relation to the civil society. Two specific objectives were to evaluate the methodological approach and the didactic materials and to evaluate the sustainability of the project. Although the focus of the evaluation has been PANA V, the project has been evaluated in its context, as one in a series of five projects located in Rwanda ten years after the war and genocide. The conclusion will consider future plans in this field. The evaluator has striven to create a holistic picture of the effects of the project, although the given time for the evaluation was short. Only three weeks were spent in the field study and only ten days in the actual field. Although there were some organisational and logistic problems, as is common when carrying out a study like this in a poor country, many literacy sites were visited and quite many participators were interviewed. The overall impression from the study is overwhelmingly positive. So many people commit themselves in this task of teaching Rwandans reading, writing and numeracy. Despite harsh conditions learners strive to learn and group leaders devote themselves to the task. Many leaders on different levels try their very best to manage their difficult and demanding task. The main objective was to explore the impact of the project on poverty reduction, particularly on empowerment and strategies for everyday life. Women were to be regarded particularly. From the results it is clear that the project has a strong, positive impact both on poverty reduction and empowerment of marginalised groups. Among those who have benefited from the alphabetisation are mainly women. Unfortunately, when it comes to leaders in PANA, who may also be said to have benefited from the project, only a small minority is women. This is something that is recommended that it be reconsidered inside the organisation. As a majority of the targeted learners are women, and as the economic and social situation of women in Rwanda is generally weak, this is a question that I recommend the Pentesostal church and ADEPR to look particularly into. With many women being single breadwinners of their households, it is important that also women get access to positions that may bring benefits of different kind. It is also clear that the project has positive effects for the civil society. In the present situation in Rwanda, during the process of reconciliation and rapid progress, basic education for the poor majority is a democratic issue. In a country with a plethora of internet-cafés in the capital and a small minority that use cars and mobile-telephones to communicate nation-wide, it is of outmost importance that the majority acquires basic education, of which literacy is a central part. To strengthen the civil society in Rwanda literacy is important. One central issue is then that Rwanda develops toward becoming a country where literacy is used for the benefit of the citizens and it is a democratic issue that all citizens get an opportunity to participate. Crucial for this is that strong efforts are put into primary schools nation-wide. Literacy projects for adults, like PANA, may only complement these efforts, but they constitute important and necessary complements. Other relevant ways to promote literacy are campaigns in Radio and TV and through cultural events such as festivals, music and theatre. News papers, magazines and books are natural parts of such campaigns as well as adult education. As stated under the results not much can be said about the didactics in this evaluation. On the whole the methodology and the materials fill their function well and receive a high reputation. As people learn to read and write under very simple conditions, obviously the approach is appropriate. A few suggestions may be given from the study: • Focus groups leaders’ attention on clearness, that they show very clearly what is to be read. Good structuring is probably of great importance for many learners. • Make clear what is tested in the tests and consider the possibility to use a holistic test that would be more congruent with the methodology. The possibility to use only one grade, pass, would enable a more practical test, such as reading a short, relevant text, writing something relevant and solving practical mathematic problems. Avoid tests that demand school knowledge. • Avoid using methaphors such as “fight against illiteracy” and connections between illiteracy/literacy and darkness/light. It is not true that illiteracy causes bad things and that literacy only brings good. • Be prepared that it may be more difficult in the future to achieve the goals as it may be the case that the early learners where the ones who achieved easily. The goal of “literacy in six month” in PANA will probably hold only for some learners but also those who do not manage in six months need literacy skills. A third objective was to secure sustainability. As for sustainability of the project in itself, and of the literacy process, the main conclusion is that there is a good potential. The commitment and devotedness among many involved in PANA proves good. One weakness is individual leaders in ADEPR who do not see this as an important task for the Pentecostal church in Rwanda. Other weaknesses are the unwillingness to mention explicitly the wish, for example among group leaders, to get some kind of incentive and the fear of loosing believers by cooperation with other organisations. A higher degree of transparency in this issue would probably solve some irritations and tensions. As for the sustainability of the literacy skills much may be done to improve. The acquired skills seem to be comparably relevant. The level achieved, and the level tested, may be defined as basic literacy skills, consisting of basic reading, writing and numeracy skills. However, these skills are very restricted and there is a high risk that the skills will decline, which means that there is a high risk that people will forget how to read and write because of lack of exercising. From these conclusions a few suggestions for future development will be given.

  • 47.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Skrift och flerspråkighet: Grundläggande litteracitet för nyanlända ungdomar2017Other (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Skrift och mobilitet bland flerspråkiga ungdomar2013In: Flerspråkighet, litteracitet och multimodalitet / [ed] Åsa Wedin; Christina Hedman, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, p. 123-142Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Skrivande bland unga vuxna som invandrat som ensamkommande barn2015In: Skriving på norsk som andrespråk: Vurdering, oppleering og elevenes stemmer / [ed] Golden, Anne & Seij, Elisabeth, Oslo: Cappelen Damm Akademisk, 2015, p. 89-108Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 50.
    Wedin, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish as Second Language.
    Språkande i förskolan coh grundskolans tidigare år2017 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
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