Dalarna University's logo and link to the university's website

du.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
123 1 - 50 of 115
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Abdillahi, Hamda A
    et al.
    Hassan, Khadra A
    Kiruja, Jonah
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Egal, Jama A
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    A mixed-methods study of maternal near miss and death after emergency cesarean delivery at a referral hospital in Somaliland2017In: International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, ISSN 0020-7292, E-ISSN 1879-3479, Vol. 138, no 1, p. 119-124Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore maternal near miss and death after emergency cesarean delivery in Somaliland, including the impact of the prerequisite for family consent.

    METHODS: A facility-based, mixed-methods study was conducted to assess all maternal near misses and deaths recorded at a referral hospital that provided services to women from all regions of Somaliland. The data sources comprised a quantitative prospective cross-sectional study using the WHO near-miss tool (performed from August 1 to December 31, 2015) and qualitative interviews with 17 healthcare providers working at the referral hospital who were in direct contact with the women in labor (performed from January 15 to March 15, 2015).

    RESULTS: Of the 138 maternal near misses and deaths recorded, 50 (36%) were associated with emergency cesarean delivery. The most frequent maternal complication was severe pre-eclampsia (n=17; 34%), and the most frequent underlying causes were hypertensive disorders (n=31; 62%) and obstetric hemorrhage (n=15; 30%). Healthcare providers were often prevented from performing emergency cesarean delivery until the required consent had been received from the woman's extended family.

    CONCLUSION: Maternity care in Somaliland must be improved, and the issue of legal authority for consent examined, to ensure both safe and timely provision of emergency cesarean delivery. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext accepted manuscript
  • 2. Ahmed, Caisha Arai
    et al.
    Khokhar, Amrish Tayyibah
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Bogren, Malin
    Defibulated immigrant women's sexual and reproductive health from the perspective of midwives and gynaecologists as primary care providers in Sweden - A phenomenographic study.2021In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 29, article id 100644Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To capture care providers' perceptions of defibulated immigrant women's sexual and reproductive health, illuminated by their experiences as care providers for these women.

    METHODS: Individual interview study with 13 care providers at Swedish healthcare facilities: six gynaecologists and seven midwives caring for defibulated immigrant women, analysed with a phenomenographic method.

    FINDINGS: One of the care providers' perceptions of women who had been defibulated was that they had an altered genital function, meaning a wider introitus, improved vaginal intercourse, and more ease urinating and menstruating. The care providers also perceived that women who were defibulated had to balance their wellbeing, struggling between a positive self-image and handling their emotions. Existing in-between cultural values led to a fear of being excluded while at the same time having a desire to be included in the new culture.

    CONCLUSION: Defibulation affects women's sexual and reproductive health and calls for a holistic perspective when providing services, individualized according to the woman's care needs. Support and counselling, should include information about defibulation already during the adolescent years to promote sexual and reproductive health and well-being.

  • 3.
    Andrén, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm.
    Akselsson, Anna
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm.
    Ali, Salma Burhan
    Region Uppsala, Enköping Hospital.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm.
    Osman, Hodan Mohamoud
    Hargeisa University, Somaliland.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health. Karolinska Institutet.
    Miscommunication influences how women act when fetal movements decrease an interview study with Swedish Somali migrant women2023In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 126, article id 103796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To explore how Swedish Somali migrant women perceive fetal movements, process information about fetal movements, and take actions if decreased fetal activity occurs.

    DESIGN: A qualitative study based on individual semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed using content analysis.

    SETTING: The study was conducted in Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: Swedish Somali migrant women (n=15) pregnant in their third trimester or recently given birth.

    FINDINGS: The analysis led to the main category: tailored information about fetal movements enhances the possibility to seek care if the movements decrease. The results are described in the generic categories: explanatory models determine action; and understand and interpret information.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: Miscommunication on fetal movements can be a hurdle for Swedish Somali migrant women that may have impact on stillbirth prevention and the quality of care. Improved communication and information tailored to individual needs is essential to achieve equality for women and their newborns.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The midwife can be used as a hub for reassuring that adequate information about fetal movements reaches each individual woman in antenatal care. Individualised information on fetal movements based on the women's own understanding is suggested to increase the possibility that the pregnant woman will seek care if the movements decrease. Somali women's verbal communication can be used to spread accurate information in the Somali community on the importance of seeking care if fetal movements decrease.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 4.
    Asaye, Mengstu Melkamu
    et al.
    University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Gelaye, Kassahun Alemu
    University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Matebe, Yohannes Hailu
    University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Effect of fetal malposition, primiparous, and premature rupture of membrane on Neonatal Near miss mediated by grade three meconium-stained amniotic fluids and duration of the active first stage of labor: Mediation analysis2023In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 18, no 5, article id e0285280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In many low-income countries, including Ethiopia, neonatal mortality remains a major concern. For every newborn that dies, many more neonates survived (near-miss neonates) the first 28 days after birth from life-threatening conditions. The generation of evidence on neonatal near-miss determinants could be a critical step in reducing neonatal mortality rates. However, studies causal pathway determinants are limited in Ethiopia. This study aimed to investigate the Neonatal Near-miss determinants in public health hospitals in Amhara Regional State, northwest Ethiopia.

    METHOD: A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1277 mother-newborn pairs at six hospitals between July 2021 and January 2022. A validated interviewer-administered questionnaire and a review of medical records were used to collect data. Data were entered into Epi-Info version 7.1.2 and exported to STATA version 16 in California, America for analysis. The paths from exposure variables to Neonatal Near-Miss via mediators were examined using multiple logistic regression analysis. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) and ß-coefficients were calculated and reported with a 95% confidence interval and a p-value of 0.05.

    RESULTS: The proportion of neonatal near-misses was 28.6% (365/1277) (95% CI: 26-31%). Women who could not read and write (AOR = 1.67,95%CI:1.14-2.47), being primiparous (AOR = 2.48,95% CI:1.63-3.79), pregnancy-induced hypertension (AOR = 2.10,95% CI:1.49-2.95),being referred from other health facilities (AOR = 2.28,95% CI:1.88-3.29), premature rupture of membrane (AOR = 1.47,95% CI:1.09-1.98), and fetal malposition (AOR = 1.89,95% CI:1.14-3.16) were associated with Neonatal Near-miss. Grade III meconium stained amniotic fluid partially mediated the relationship between primiparous (ß = 0.517), fetal malposition (ß = 0.526), pregnant women referred from other health facilities (ß = 0.948) and Neonatal Near-Miss at P-value < 0.01. Duration of the active first stage of labour partially mediated the relationship between primiparous (ß = -0.345), fetal malposition (ß = -0.656), premature rupture of membranes (ß = -0.550) and Neonatal Near-Miss at P- value <0.01.It had also a significant indirect effect (ß = 0.581, P<0.001) on NNM with variables (primiparous, fetal malposition, and premature rupture of membranes).

    CONCLUSIONS: The relationship between fetal malposition, primiparous, referred from other health facilities, premature rupture of membrane, and Neonatal Near miss were partially mediated by grade III meconium stained amniotic fluid and duration of the active first stage of labour. Early diagnosis of these potential danger signs and appropriate intervention could be of supreme importance in reducing NNM.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Asaye, Mengstu Melkamu
    et al.
    University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Gelaye, Kassahun Alemu
    University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Matebe, Yohannes Hailu
    University of Gondar, Gondar, Ethiopia.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna; Sofiahemmet University, Stockholm.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health. Karolinska Institutet, Solna.
    Experience and perceptions of healthcare providers on clinical management and care of near-miss infants: a qualitative content analysis2023In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Neonatal Near Miss (NNM) refers to neonates with severe complications who almost died but survived immediately after birth. In Ethiopia, the prevalence of NNM has been assessed using a validated Neonatal Near-Miss Assessment Scale. However, understanding the experiences and perceptions of healthcare providers in the clinical management and care of NNM infants remains unexplored. The aim was to investigate the determinants contributing to the survival of neonatal near-miss babies and to identify any barriers encountered, as reported by the experiences of healthcare providers in public hospitals of Amhara Regional State, northwest Ethiopia.

    METHODS: Semi structured interviews were used to collect data from 25 midwives, nurses, and pediatricians with at least six months of prior experience in one of the labor wards or neonatal intensive care units at one of the four public health hospitals in the Amhara Regional state of northwest Ethiopia included in a large intervention study assessing a NNM scale. Purposeful sampling was used, selecting participants based on their experiences related to the aim of this study. The participants had a varying level of education and years of experience to care for NNM infants. The average age of the healthcare providers was 31 years, with 7 years of work experience. The transcripts of the interviews with the healthcare providers were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: The experience and perceptions of healthcare providers was described in the main category "A sense of hopelessness when caring for the baby" capturing a broader emotional and professional aspect, while the subcategories "Unclear responsibilities discharging one's mission", "Provision of kangaroo mother care" and "Quick action required at birth" are more specific and practical. Healthcare providers perceived a sense of hopelessness when caring for the NNM infant, particularly providing Kangaroo Mother Care (KMC) and quick actions when required at birth to save the life of the infant.

    CONCLUSION: Unclear responsibilities and a sense of hopelessness could have acted as barriers, hindering the ability of healthcare providers to fulfill their mission of taking swift actions and providing KMC to NNM infants, thus impacting their ability to save the lives of these infants. Healthcare providers' and parents' attitudes must be changed towards hope rather than hopelessness when caring for NNM infants.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Avelin, Pernilla
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Mid Sweden University.
    Davidsson-Bremborg, Anna
    Lund University.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Make the stillborn baby and the loss real for the sibling: parents' advice on how the siblings of a stillborn baby can be supported2012In: Journal of Perinatal Education, ISSN 1058-1243, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 90-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to investigate parents' advice to other parents on the basis of their own experiences of siblings' taking leave of a stillborn sister or brother. The study was a Web questionnaire study of 411 parents. The thematic content analysis resulted in two categories: "Make the stillborn baby and the loss real for the siblings" and "Take the siblings' resources and prerequisites into account." Parents' advised that siblings should see and hold the stillborn baby and, thus, be invited and included into the leave-taking process with respect to the siblings' feelings, resources, and prerequisites. Based on these findings, professional caregivers can usefully be proactive in their approach to facilitate and encourage the involvement of siblings.

  • 7.
    Avelin, Pernilla
    et al.
    Karolinska institutet.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Hildingsson, Ingegerd
    Mittuniversitetet.
    Rådestad, Inegla
    Sophiahemmet högskola.
    Swedish parents' experiences of parenthood and the need for support to siblings when a baby is stillborn2011In: Birth, ISSN 0730-7659, E-ISSN 1523-536X, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 150-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:

    It has been argued that having a stillborn baby in the family affects older siblings more than parents realize. The aim of this study was to describe parenthood and the needs of siblings after stillbirth from the parents' perspective.

    Methods:

    Six focus groups were held with 27 parents who had experienced a stillbirth and who had had children before the loss. The discussion concerned parents' support to the siblings, and the sibling's meeting, farewell, and memories of their little sister or brother. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results:

    The overall theme of the findings was parenthood in a balance between grief and everyday life. In the analysis, three categories emerged that described the construction of the theme: support in an acute situation, sharing the experiences within the family, and adjusting to the situation.

    Conclusions:

    The siblings' situation is characterized by having a parent who tries to maintain a balance between grief and everyday life. Parents are present and engaged in joint activities around the stillbirth together with the siblings of the stillborn baby. Although parents are aware of the sibling's situation, they feel that they are left somewhat alone in their parenthood after stillbirth and therefore need support and guidance from others.

  • 8.
    Avelin, Pernilla
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Gyllenswärd, Göran
    Psychotherapy and Grief Consultant, Stockholm.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet University College, Stockholm.
    Adolescents' experiences of having a stillborn half-sibling2013In: Death Studies, ISSN 0748-1187, E-ISSN 1091-7683, Vol. 38, no 9, p. 557-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although there is an increasing interest in siblings' experiences of loss and grief there is limited knowledge of adolescent's own perspectives, especially in a unique situation as after stillbirth in a reconstituted family. The authors interviewed 13 bereaved adolescents. They were sad that their family was not the same and expressed feelings of being inside family grief, yet outside, because they did not have full access in their reconstituted family. An implication of present findings is that it is important to include all the members of the family in the grieving process, even half-siblings of the deceased child.

  • 9. Avelin, Pernilla
    et al.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Säflund, Karin
    Wredling, Regina
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Mälardalen University.
    Parental grief and relationships after the loss of a stillborn baby2012In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 668-673Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Avelin, Pernilla
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Sophiahemmet Univ Coll.
    Säflund, Karin
    Karolinska Inst.
    Wredling, Regina
    Karolinska Inst.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Parental grief and relationships after the loss of a stillborn baby2013In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 29, no 6, p. 668-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: to describe the grief of mothers and fathers and its influence on their relationships after the loss of a stillborn baby.

    Design: a postal questionnaire at three months, one year and two years after stillbirth.

    Setting: a study of mothers and fathers of babies stillborn during a one-year period in the Stockholm region of Sweden.

    Participants: 55 parents, 33 mothers and 22 fathers.

    Findings: mothers and fathers stated that they became closer after the loss, and that the feeling deepened over the course of the following year. The parents said that they began grieving immediately as a gradual process, both as individuals, and together as a couple. During this grieving process their expectations, expressions and personal and joint needs might have threatened their relationship as a couple, in that they individually felt alone at this time of withdrawal. While some mothers and fathers had similar grieving styles, the intensity and expression of grief varied, and the effects were profound and unique for each individual.

    Key conclusions: experiences following a loss are complex, with each partner attempting to come to terms with the loss and the resultant effect on the relationship with their partner.

    Implications for practice: anticipating and being able to acknowledge the different aspects of grief will enable professionals to implement more effective intervention in helping couples grieve both individually and together.

  • 11. Ayala, Ana
    et al.
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Christensson, Eva
    Cavada, Gabriel
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health. Karolinska Institutet.
    Velandia, Marianne
    Newborn infants who received skin-to-skin contact with fathers after Caesarean sections showed stable physiological patterns.2021In: Acta Paediatrica, ISSN 0803-5253, E-ISSN 1651-2227, Vol. 110, no 5, p. 1461-1467Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Separating infants and their parents after a Caesarean section is still the routine care worldwide. This study investigated three caregiving models on the wakefulness and physiological parameters of full-term infants after an elective Caesarean section.

    METHODS: Newborn infants born in a Chilean public hospital in 2009-12 were randomised to three groups: cot, fathers' arms or skin-to-skin contact with their father. They were assessed at 15-minute intervals, from 45 to 120 minutes after the Caesarean section. Their physiological parameters were measured, and their wakefulness was assessed using the Neonatal Behavioural Assessment Scale.

    RESULTS: We studied 95 infant (53% girls) born at a mean gestational age of 38.9 ± 0.9 weeks. Heart rates were significantly higher in the skin-to-skin than cot or fathers' arms groups and showed greater stability over time. Wakefulness was initially higher in the skin-to-skin group, but there were no significant differences by the end of the observation. There were no differences between the groups in peripheral oxygen saturation. Skin-to-skin contact had no negative impact on the infants.

    CONCLUSION: The skin-to-skin group showed some advantages over the cot and fathers' arms groups when it came to establishing stable physiological parameters and wakefulness. This approach should be supported during mother-infant separation.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12. Ayala, Ana
    et al.
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Velandia, Marianne
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska Institutet.
    Fathers’ care of the newborn infant after caesarean section in Chile: a qualitative study2016In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 8, p. 75-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Chilean hospitals the current model of care after caesarean section is to separate newborn infants from both parents. The care of newborn infants and the parents' experience immediately after caesarean section requires further exploration.

    Aim: To describe fathers' experiences and perceptions of being the primary caregiver to their newborn infant during the first 90 minutes after caesarean section in a public general maternity hospital setting in Santiago de Chile.

    Method: The questionnaire was one part of a larger research programme named: “Caregiving Models after Elective Caesarean Section – Parents' perceptions and effects on infants' wellbeing”. Four open ended questions were used to gather written text on the experiences and perceptions of 95 fathers who were the primary caregiver to their newborn infant. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethics Committee, Scientific Assessment Metropolitan Health Service South East. Systematic text condensation according to Malterud's description was used for analysis of the written text.

    Findings: Two themes were identified: “understanding the first moment of life” and “shared responsibility for future family life” with each theme divided into six categories.

    Conclusion: This study concludes by arguing that in situations where the mother is unavailable or unable to provide basic care, the father should be supported to care for the newborn infant.

    Clinical implications: Parents should be made aware of the benefits of this caring model especially when mother and baby have been separated after birth.

  • 13. Ayala, Ana
    et al.
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Velandia, Marianne
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet.
    Mother’s experiences and perceptions of a continuous caring model with fathers after caesarean section: a qualitative study2015In: Women's Health Open Journal, ISSN 2380-3940, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 63-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In Chile, mothers and newborns are separated after caesarean sections. The caesarean

    section rate in Chile is approximately 40%. Once separated, newborns will miss out on

    the benefits of early contact unless a suitable model of early newborn contact after caesarean

    section is initiated.

    Aim: To describe mothers experiences and perceptions of a continuous parental model of newborn

    care after caesarean section during mother-infant separation.

    Methods: A questionnaire with 4 open ended questions to gather data on the experiences and

    perceptions of 95 mothers in the obstetric service of Sótero Del Rio Hospital in Chile between

    2009 and 2012. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.

    Results: One theme family friendly practice after caesarean section and four categories. Mothers

    described the benefits of this model of caring. The fathers presence was important to mother

    and baby. Mothers were reassured that the baby was not left alone with staff. It was important

    for the mothers to see that the father could love the baby as much as the mother. This model

    of care helped create ties between the father and newborn during the period of mother-infant

    separation and later with the mother.

    Conclusions: Family friendly practice after caesarean section was an important health care

    intervention for the whole family. This model could be stratified in the Chilean context in the

    case of complicated births and all caesarean sections.

    Clinical Implications: In the Chilean context, there is the potential to increase the number of

    parents who get to hold their baby immediately after birth and for as long as they like. When

    the mother and infant are separated after birth, parents can be informed about the benefits of

    this caring model. Further research using randomized control trials may support biological

    advantages.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14. Bajracharya, Kiran
    et al.
    Sapkota, Sabitri
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    News & events: A milestone of Midwifery in Nepal2014In: Journal of Asian Midwives (JAM), ISSN 2409-2290, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 2p. 2-4Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15. Blomgren, J.
    et al.
    Wells, M. B.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health. Karolinska Institutet.
    Amongin, D.
    Kabiri, L.
    Lindgren, H.
    Putting co-creation into practice: lessons learned from developing a midwife-led quality improvement intervention2023In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 2275866Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Integrating evidence-based midwifery practices improves healthcare quality for women and newborns, but an evidence-to-practice gap exists. Co-created quality improvement initiatives led by midwives could bridge this gap, prevent resource waste and ensure intervention relevance. However, how to co-create a midwife-led quality improvement intervention has not been scientifically explored. Objective: The objective of this study is to describe the co-creation process and explore the needs and determinants of a midwife-led quality improvement targeting evidence-based midwifery practices. Methods: A qualitative deductive approach using the Consolidated Framework for Advancing Implementation Science was employed. An analysis matrix based on the framework was developed, and the data were coded according to categories. Data were gathered from interviews, focus group discussions, observations and workshops. New mothers and birth companions (n = 19) were included through convenience sampling. Midwives (n = 26), professional association representatives, educators, policymakers, managers, and doctors (n = 7) were purposely sampled. Results: The co-creation process of the midwife-led Quality Improvement intervention took place in four stages. Firstly, core elements of the intervention were established, featuring a group of midwife champions leading a quality improvement initiative using a train-the-trainers approach. Secondly, the intervention needs, context and determinants were explored, which showed knowledge and skills gaps, a lack of shared goals among staff, and limited resources. However, there was clear relevance, compatibility, and mission alignment for a midwife-led quality improvement at all levels. Thirdly, during co-creation workshops with new mothers and companions, the consensus was to prioritise improved intrapartum support, while workshops with midwives identified enhancing the use of birth positions and perineal protection as key focus areas for the forthcoming Quality Improvement intervention. Lastly, the findings guided intervention strategies, including peer-assisted learning, using existing structures, developing educational material, and building stakeholder relationships. Conclusions: This study provides a practical example of a co-creation process for a midwife-led quality improvement intervention, which can be relevant in different maternity care settings. © 2023 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 16.
    Blomgren, Johanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Gabrielsson, Sara
    Lund University Centre for Sustainability Studies, Lund.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Wagoro, Miriam C A
    University of Nairobi, Nairobi, Kenya.
    Namutebi, Mariam
    Makerere University College of Health Sciences, Kampala, Uganda.
    Chimala, Eveles
    Kamuzu University of Health Sciences, Blantyre, Malawi.
    Lindgren, Helena
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm; Sophiahemmet University, Stockholm.
    Maternal health leaders' perceptions of barriers to midwife-led care in Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Somalia, and Uganda.2023In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 124, article id 103734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To identify and examine barriers to midwife-led care in Eastern Africa and how these barriers can be reduced DESIGN: A qualitative inductive study with online focus group discussions and semi-structured interviews using content analysis SETTING: The study examines midwife-led care in Ethiopia, Malawi, Kenya, Somalia, and Uganda -five African countries with an unmet need for midwives and a need to improve maternal and neonatal health outcomes.

    PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five participants with a health care profession background and current position as a maternal and child health leader from one of the five study countries.

    FINDINGS: The findings demonstrate barriers to midwife-led care connected to organisational structures, traditional hierarchies, gender disparities, and inadequate leadership. Societal and gendered norms, organisational traditions, and differences in power and authority between professions are some factors explaining why the barriers persist. A focus on intra- and multisectoral collaborations, the inclusion of midwife leaders, and providing midwives with role models to leverage their empowerment are examples of how to reduce the barriers.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: This study provides new knowledge on midwife-led care from the perspectives of health leaders in five African countries. Transforming outdated structures to ensure midwives are empowered to deliver midwife-led care at all healthcare system levels is crucial to moving forward.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTISE: This knowledge is important as enhancing the midwife-led care provision is associated with substantially improved maternal and neonatal health outcomes, higher satisfaction of care, and enhanced utilisation of health system resources. Nevertheless, the model of care is not adequately integrated into the five countries' health systems. Future studies are warranted to further explore how reducing barriers to midwife-led care can be adapted at a broader level.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 17.
    Bogren, M.
    et al.
    PhD Student, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg.
    Bajracharya, U.
    Maharajgunj Nursing Campus, Tribhuvan University, Nepa.
    Berg, M.
    Professor, Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, University of Gothenburg.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalens högskola.
    Ireland, J.
    Midwife, RCM Union Learning Rep & Supervisor of Midwives, St Mary's Maternity Unit, Poole Hospital, United Kingdom.
    Simkhada, P.
    Senior Lecturer, School of Health and Related Research (ScHARR) University of Sheffield and MMIHS, United Kingdom.
    Van Teijlingen, Edwin
    Professor, Centre for Midwifery, Maternal & Perinatal Health, Bornemouth University & Visiting Professor, MMIHS, Tribhuvan University, United Kingdom.
    Nepal needs midwifery2013In: Journal of Manmohan Memorial Institute of Health Sciences, ISSN 2091-1041, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 41-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 18. Bogren, M.
    et al.
    Banu, A.
    Parvin, S.
    Chowdhury, M.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health. Karolinska Institutet.
    Findings from a context specific accreditation assessment at 38 public midwifery education institutions in Bangladesh2021In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 34, no 1, p. e76-e83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 19. Bogren, M.
    et al.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Johansson, A.
    Kalid, M.
    Abdi Igal, A.
    Mohamed, J.
    Said, F.
    Pedersen, Christina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Health workforce perspectives of barriers inhibiting the provision of quality care in Nepal and Somalia: A qualitative study2020In: Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare, ISSN 1877-5756, Vol. 23, article id 100481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    In this paper settings from Nepal and Somalia are used to focus on the perspectives of healthcare providers within two fragile health systems. The objective of this study was to describe barriers inhibiting quality healthcare in Nepal and Somalia from a health workforce perspective.

    Methods

    Data were collected through 19 semi-structured interviews with healthcare providers working in healthcare facilities. Ten interviews were conducted in Nepal and nine in Somalia.

    Results

    Various structural barriers inhibiting the availability, accessibility, and acceptability of the quality care were similar in both countries. Barriers inhibiting the availability of quality care were linked to healthcare providers being overburdened with multiple concurrent jobs. Barriers inhibiting the accessibility to quality healthcare included long distances and the uncertain availability of transportation, and barriers to acceptability of quality healthcare was inhibited by a lack of respect from healthcare providers, characterised by neglect, verbal abuse, and lack of competence.

    Conclusions

    Inequality, poverty, traditional and cultural practices plus the heavy burden placed on healthcare providers are described as the underlying causes of the poor provision of quality care and the consequential shortcomings that emerge from it. In order to improve this situation adequate planning and policies that support the deployment and retention of the healthcare providers and its equitable distribution is required. Another important aspect is provision of training to equip healthcare providers with the ability to provide respectful quality care in order for the population to enjoy good standard of healthcare services.

  • 20. Bogren, Malin
    et al.
    Alesö, Anna
    Teklemariam, Milena
    Sjöblom, Helen
    Hammarbäck, Linda
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health. Karolinska Institute, Solna.
    Facilitators of and barriers to providing high-quality midwifery education in South-East Asia: An integrative review2021In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 35, no 3, p. E199-E210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With a diversity in midwifery education across the South-East Asia region, and with the knowledge about the lifesaving competency of the midwife profession, this study's aim is to describe facilitators of and barriers to providing high-quality midwifery education in South-East Asia.

    METHODS: Inspired by Whittemore and Knafl, we conducted a systematic integrative literature review including the five key stages of problem identification, literature search, data evaluation, data analysis, and presentation of results. The literature searches were conducted in October 2020 in the databases CINAHL, PubMed, and Scopus. A deductive data analysis based on global standards was performed.

    RESULTS: The search identified 1257 articles, 34 of which were included. Countries in South-East Asia did not fully comply with the ICM global standards. Midwifery education was not separated from that of nursing, and educators lacked formal qualifications in midwifery. Curriculum implementation in the clinical area was a key barrier to achieving learning outcomes. Higher academic education for midwifery educators and mentorship programs facilitated the pedagogic and assessment process, focusing on the abilities of critical thinking, reflection, and decision-making.

    CONCLUSIONS: Countries in South-East Asia still have a long way to go before they can provide high-quality midwifery education. The identified facilitators can lead to a difference in students' academic achievement and confidence in their clinical work. Coordinated actions will enable the progress in achieving competent midwives matching national health priorities. The findings highlight a need for more research on midwifery education in both theory and practice across the region.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 21.
    Bogren, Malin
    et al.
    Univ Gothenburg, Sahlgrenska Acad, Inst Hlth & Care Sci, Arvid Wallgrens Backe 1, S-41346 Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Banu, Afroza
    Sher E Bangla Nagar Nursing Coll, Directorate Gen Nursing & Midwifery, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Parvin, Shahanaj
    Sher E Bangla Nagar Nursing Coll, Directorate Gen Nursing & Midwifery, Dhaka, Bangladesh..
    Chowdhury, Merry
    Chattogram Nursing Coll, Chattogram, Bangladesh..
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Implementation of a context-specific accreditation assessment tool for affirming quality midwifery education in Bangladesh: a qualitative research study2020In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 13, no 1, article id 1761642Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Only recently did midwifery become a profession in Bangladesh. As such, sufficient quality education, both theory and practice, remains a challenge. In 2018, a context-specific accreditation assessment tool for affirming quality midwifery education was therefore developed and implemented. Objectives: To describe both the positive and negative aspects of the implementation of an accreditation process at midwifery education institutions in Bangladesh and to sketch out areas for possible improvement. Method: Forty focus group discussions were conducted with 276 policymakers, regulatory authorities and educators involved in midwifery education and services in Bangladesh. The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) was used in a directed content analysis approach. Results: The accreditation assessment tool was developed using a participatory and consensus-building approach, building on existing policies, which resulted in the national ownership of its implementation. Staff from clinical sites were not included in the accreditation process; unless this changes, this will make it difficult for Bangladesh to achieve the set accreditation standards. The accreditation process has improved communication between the midwifery teaching institutions, policymakers and regulatory authorities. Educators started to visit the clinical sites more frequently. The planning process was complex and time-consuming, and emphasis was put on the importance of developing a plan of action for measuring improvements. Conclusion: In the move from the initial assessment of an accreditation process to its implementation, it is essential to make public the results found at all educational institutions. This encourages acceptance, while soliciting feedback and suggestions for future action. Only then can an accreditation process have an impact on the provision of high-quality midwifery education and services. This paper aims to encourage and guide other countries in their development, planning and implementation of a national accreditation process for midwifery education.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 22.
    Bogren, Malin
    et al.
    UNPF, Bangladesh.
    Begum, Farida
    UNPF, Bangladesh.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    The historical development of the midwifery profession in Bangladesh2017In: Journal of Asian Midwives (JAM), ISSN 2409-2290, Vol. 4, no 1, p. 65-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sexual and reproductive health and rights have been identified as the core areas of practice, theory and research for the midwifery profession. The midwifery profession, as defined by the International Confederation of Midwives Global Standards, is new in Bangladesh. This paper aims to give an overview of the historical process that has taken place in the past decades to develop the midwifery profession in Bangladesh. The professional development of midwives is the result of many years of collaboration and relationship building among stakeholders such as the government, non-government organizations, academia, professional associations, United Nations agencies, and donors. All are working toward achieving the common goal of preventing/ reducing maternal and child mortality through education, the development of supportive laws, policies and guidelines, and the deployment of midwives. Lessons learnt from the Bangladesh experience can provide useful guidance for other countries in Asia that are currently establishing midwifery as a profession that aims to provide safe and high quality sexual, reproductive, maternal and newborn care.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 23.
    Bogren, Malin
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Aastrika Midwifery centre, a model for midwifery-led care in India2021In: Journal of Asian Midwives (JAM), ISSN 2409-2290, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 3-5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 24.
    Bogren, Malin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Opportunities, challenges and strategies when building a midwifery profession. Findings from a qualitative study in Bangladesh and Nepal2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 16, p. 45-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of this paper was to identify opportunities and challenges when building a midwifery profession in Bangladesh and Nepal.

    Methods

    Data were collected through 33 semi-structured interviews with government officials, policy-makers, donors, and individuals from academia and non-government organizations with an influence in building a midwifery profession in their respective countries. Data were analyzed using content analysis.

    Findings

    The opportunities and challenges found in Bangladesh and Nepal when building a midwifery profession emerged the theme “A comprehensive collaborative approach, with a political desire, can build a midwifery profession while competing views, interest, priorities and unawareness hamper the process”. Several factors were found to facilitate the establishment of a midwifery profession in both countries. For example, global and national standards brought together midwifery professionals and stakeholders, and helped in the establishment of midwifery associations. The challenges for both countries were national commitments without a full set of supporting policy documents, lack of professional recognition, and competing views, interests and priorities.

    Conclusion and clinical application

    This study demonstrated that building a midwifery profession requires a political comprehensive collaborative approach supported by a political commitment. Through bringing professionals together in a professional association will bring a professional status. Global standards and guidelines need to be contextualized into national policies and plans where midwives are included as part of the national health workforce. This is a key for creating recognized midwives with a protected title to autonomously practice midwifery, to upholding the sexual and reproductive health and rights for women and girls.

  • 25.
    Bogren, Malin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    What prevents midwifery quality care in Bangladesh? A focus group enquiry with midwifery students2018In: BMC Health Services Research, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 18, no 1, article id 639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With professional midwives being introduced in Bangladesh in 2013, the aim of this study was to describe midwifery students perceptions on midwives' realities in Bangladesh, based on their own experiences.

    METHOD: Data were collected through 14 focus group discussions that included a total of 67 third-year diploma midwifery students at public nursing institutes/colleges in different parts of Bangladesh. Data were analyzed deductively using an analytical framework identifying social, professional and economical barriers to the provision of quality care by midwifery personnel.

    RESULTS: The social barriers preventing midwifery quality care falls outside the parameters of Bangladeshi cultural norms that have been shaped by beliefs associated with religion, society, and gender norms. This puts midwives in a vulnerable position due to cultural prejudice. Professional barriers include heavy workloads with a shortage of staff who were not utilized to their full capacity within the health system. The reason for this was a lack of recognition in the medical hierarchy, leaving midwives with low levels of autonomy. Economical barriers were reflected by lack of supplies and hospital beds, midwives earning only low and/or irregular salaries, a lack of opportunities for recreation, and personal insecurity related to lack of housing and transportation.

    CONCLUSION: Without adequate support for midwives, to strengthen their self-confidence through education and through continuous professional and economic development, little can be achieved in terms of improving quality care of women during the period around early and late pregnancy including childbirth.The findings can be used for discussions aimed to mobilize a midwifery workforce across the continuum of care to deliver quality reproductive health care services. No matter how much adequate support is provided to midwives, to strengthen their self-confidence through education, continuous professional and economic development, addressing the social barriers is a prerequisite for provision of quality care.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 26.
    Bogren, Malin
    et al.
    Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Jha, Paridhi
    Foundation for Research in Health Systems, Bangalore, Karnataka, India.
    Sharma, Bharati
    Indian Institute of Public Health Gandhinagar, Gujarat, India.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg.
    Contextual factors influencing the implementation of midwifery-led care units in India2023In: Women and Birth, ISSN 1871-5192, E-ISSN 1878-1799, Vol. 36, no 1, p. e134-e141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The Government of India has committed to educate 90,000 midwives functioning in midwifery-led care units (MLCUs) to care for women during labour and birth. There is a need to consider local circumstances in India, as there is no 'one size fits all' prescription for MLCUs.

    AIM: To explore contextual factors influencing the implementation of MLCUs across India.

    METHOD: Data were collected through six focus group interviews with 16 nurses, midwives, public health experts and physicians, representing six national and international organisations supporting the Indian Government in its midwifery initiative. Transcribed interviews were analysed using content analysis.

    FINDINGS: Four generic categories describe the contextual factors which influence the implementation of MLCUs in India: (i) Perceptions of the Nurse Practitioner in Midwifery and MLCUs and their acceptance, (ii) Reversing the medicalization of childbirth, (iii) Engagement with the community, and (iv) The need for legal frameworks and standards.

    CONCLUSION: Based on the identified contextual factors in this study, we recommend that in India and other similar contexts the following should be in place when designing and implementing MLCUs: legal frameworks to enable midwives to provide full scope of practice in line with the midwifery philosophy and informed by global standards; pre- and in-service training to optimize interdisciplinary teamwork and the knowledge and skills required for the implementation of the midwifery philosophy; midwifery leadership acknowledged as key to the planning and implementation of midwifery-led care at the MLCUs; and a demand among women created through effective midwifery-led care and advocacy messages.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 27. Bogren, Malin
    et al.
    Rosengren, Josefin
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Berg, Marie
    Build professional competence and equip with strategies to empower midwifery students - An interview study evaluating a simulation-based learning course for midwifery educators in Bangladesh.2019In: Nurse Education in Practice, ISSN 1471-5953, E-ISSN 1873-5223, Vol. 35, p. 27-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Use of simulation-based learning in midwifery education programmes is crucial. Due to midwifery educators in Bangladesh were lacking competence in using such pedagogical methods in their teaching, they were invited to participate in a simulation-based learning course. In this paper, we present a study on the perceived usefulness of this course. Semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with 17 of the 28 midwifery educators participating on the course and data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Findings showed that the simulation-based learning course for midwifery educators in Bangladesh was useful. It "builds the professional competence of midwifery educators" and "equips them with strategies to empower midwifery students". The findings show that a simulation-based learning course is of major importance in pre-service education in settings where the capacity of midwifery educators needs to be strengthened. However, without continuous in-service training, the midwives' competence will deteriorate and this in turn will threaten the quality of midwifery education and the midwifery profession. Thus, contextualized pre- and in-service simulation-based education to secure midwifery core competencies is necessary. Simultaneously implementing and evaluating pre- and in-service education programmes is the next step in the struggle to increase the quality of maternity care services.

  • 28. Bogren, Malin
    et al.
    Sathyanarayanan, Doraiswamy
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Akhter, Halima
    Akter, Dalia
    Begum, Momtaz
    Chowdhury, Merry
    Das, Lucky
    Akter, Rehana
    Khatun, Yamin Ara
    Development of a context specific accreditation assessment tool for affirming quality midwifery education in Bangladesh2018In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 61, p. 74-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: using the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) Global Standards for Midwifery Education as a conceptual framework, the aim of this study was to explore and describe important 'must haves' for inclusion in a context-specific accreditation assessment tool in Bangladesh.

    DESIGN: A questionnaire study was conducted using a Likert rating scale and 111 closed-response single items on adherence to accreditation-related statements, ending with an open-ended question. The ICM Global Standards guided data collection, deductive content analysis and description of the quantitative results.

    SETTING: twenty-five public institutes/colleges (out of 38 in Bangladesh), covering seven out of eight geographical divisions in the country.

    PARTICIPANTS: one hundred and twenty-three nursing educators teaching the 3-year diploma midwifery education programme.

    FINDINGS: this study provides insight into the development of a context-specific accreditation assessment tool for Bangladesh. Important components to be included in this accreditation tool are presented under the following categories and domains: 'organization and administration', 'midwifery faculty', 'student body', 'curriculum content', 'resources, facilities and services' and 'assessment strategies'. The identified components were a prerequisite to ensure that midwifery students achieve the intended learning outcomes of the midwifery curriculum, and hence contribute to a strong midwifery workforce. The components further ensure well-prepared teachers and a standardized curriculum supported at policy level to enable effective deployment of professional midwives in the existing health system.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: as part of developing an accreditation assessment tool, it is imperative to build ownership and capacity when translating the ICM Global Standards for Midwifery Education into the national context.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: this initiative can be used as lessons learned from Bangladesh to develop a context-specific accreditation assessment tool in line with national priorities, supporting the development of national policies.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 29.
    Borneskog, Catrin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Engström, Gabriella
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Islam, Noor
    Dalarna University, Falun.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Pedersen, Christina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Strömsöe, Anneli
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Medical Science.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    MSc student group,
    Public nursing institute in Bangladesh.
    Midwife Educators' perceptions of the efficacy of the Objective Structured clinical assessment of life-saving interventions - a qualitative interview study in Bangladesh2023In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 37, article id 100861Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Objective Structured Clinical Assessment (OSCA) is a way of evaluating students or clinicians in how they are carrying out their duties. The aim of this study was to examine how midwifery educators in Bangladesh perceived using OSCA as an assessment device in midwifery education for student performance in life-saving midwifery interventions.

    METHOD: Individual interviews were conducted with 47 academic midwives and clinical midwives using purposive sampling at 38 education institutions in Bangladesh. Content analysis inspired by Elo and Kyngas was used to analyze the data.

    RESULTS: The ability of students to perform effectively in the OSCA-evaluated simulation of life-saving skills was related to the educators' understanding of the concept of midwifery. The overarching main category of this study showed that for midwifery educators to be able to effectually teach professional, evidence-based midwifery, they need to be able to synthesize the delivery of practical and theoretical skills with pedagogical skills and knowledge. To implement the OSCA tool more effectively, midwifery educators need to understand the underpinning principles of midwifery values and philosophy including leadership, ownership, responsibility, and personal engagement.

    CONCLUSION: There is potential to improve the efficacy of using OSCA to deliver the teaching of life-saving skills. Team sessions with midwives and physicians aiming to practice teamwork and role divisions in life-saving interventions are recommended.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 30.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Akther, Hasne Ara
    Khatoon, Zohra
    Bogren, Malin
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Social, economic and professional barriers influencing midwives’ realities in Bangladesh: a qualitative study of midwifery educators preparing midwifery students for clinical reality2019In: Evidence Based Midwifery., ISSN 1479-4489, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 19-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction

    Identifying existing barriers inhibiting the provision of quality care in Bangladesh can guide both the government, in fulfilling its commitment to establishing the midwifery profession, and midwifery educators, in preparing midwifery students for the reality of midwifery clinical work.

    Aim

    The aim of this study was to describe midwifery educators’ perceptions of midwives’ realities in Bangladesh, focusing on social, economic, and professional barriers preventing them from carrying out quality care.

    Methods

    Data were collected through focus group discussions with 17 midwifery educators and analysed using qualitative content analysis, guided by the analytical framework “What prevents quality midwifery care?”. Ethical clearance was obtained from Bangladesh’s Directorate General of Nursing and Midwifery.

    Results

    The results generated by the application of the framework included social barriers of gender structures in Bangladeshi society. This influenced entry into midwifery education, carrying out midwifery work safely, and the development of the profession. Economic barriers included challenges for Bangladesh as a low-income country with a large population, inadequate salaries, and staff shortages, adding extra strain to midwives’ working conditions. These social and economic barriers were further enhanced by professional barriers due to the midwifery profession not yet being fully established or acknowledged in the health system.

    Conclusions and implications

    The study presents novel country-specific perspectives but confirms the general underlying issues of gender inequality as a base for barriers preventing midwives from carrying out quality care, in line with the framework “What prevents quality midwifery care?”. Addressing these structures can facilitate more students to enter midwifery education, enable quality midwifery work free from discrimination, and provide sufficient working space and professional integrity. Leadership training is pivotal to increasing responsiveness to the needs of the new cadre of midwives. Midwifery educators should take the lead in sensitising clinical supervisors, mentors, and preceptors about midwives’ realities in Bangladesh.

  • 31.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Hussein, I. H.
    Yusuf, F. M.
    Egal, J. A.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    The situation for female survivors of non-partner sexual violence: A focused enquiry of Somali young women's views, knowledge and opinions2018In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 16, p. 39-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    The aim of the study is to elucidate young women’s perceptions of the situation for female survivors of non-partner sexual violence in Somaliland.

    Methods

    Young Somali women with diverse backgrounds (n = 25) shared views, knowledge and opinions about non partner sexual violence in focus group discussions held in urban settings. Data was analysed using content analysis.

    Results

    A main category “Bound by culture and community perceptions” with four subcategories comprises the informants’ perceptions of non-partner sexual violence among young women in Somaliland. Illuminated is the importance of protecting oneself and the family dignity, a fear of being rejected and mistrusted, how the juridical system exists in the shadow of tradition and potential keys to healthcare support.

    Conclusion

    The study raises awareness of the dilemmas which may be faced by young women subjected to non-partner sexual violence and healthcare providers in the intersection between state and traditional norms. Education is a key when it comes to a young woman considering the use of the services available in a society where traditional problem-solving is relied on parallel to state-based support. State-based functions, communities and families need to work together to provide comprehensive support to young female survivors of non-partner sexual violence in Somaliland.

  • 32.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Members of the Midwifery Faculty Master’s degree holders in Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights, Bangladesh
    Bogren, Malin
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Midwives realities in Bangladesh: A focus group enquiry with midwifery students and educators2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Cacciatore, J.
    et al.
    Arizona State University.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Rådestad, I.
    Sophiahemmet University College.
    Fatherhood and suffering: a qualitative exploration of Swedish men's experiences of care after the death of a baby2013In: International Journal of Nursing Studies, ISSN 0020-7489, E-ISSN 1873-491X, Vol. 50, no 5, p. 664-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This study was designed to evaluate fathers' experiences of stillbirth and psychosocial care.

    Methods: Data were collected between 27 March 2008 and 1 April 2010 via a questionnaire posted on the homepage of the Swedish National Infant Foundation. The responses to the following open-ended questions were analyzed using content analysis: "Are you grateful today for anything that health care professionals did in connection with the birth of your child?" and " Are you sad, hurt or angry today about something personnel did in connection with the birth of your baby?"

    Results: 113/131 (86%) fathers reported feelings of being grateful. Only 22/131 (16%) fathers reported feeling sad, hurt, or angry. Fathers expressed gratitude when health care professionals treated their newborn " with respect and without fear" , " with extraordinary reverence" , and when their fatherhood was validated by providers. They were also grateful when providers helped them to create memories of their baby. Fathers also reported feeling sad, hurt, or angry when providers were nonchalant and indifferent and when they perceived providers to be uncaring and disrespectful toward their baby.

    Conclusion: Bereaved fathers experience overall gratitude for person-centered psychosocial care in the aftermath of stillbirth, particularly when they feel validated as a grieving father and their child is acknowledged with reverence. Clinical implications: Health care professionals should support fathers by treating the baby who died with respect and dignity and by validating and acknowledging both his grief experiences and his fatherhood just as they would for a grieving mother.

  • 34. Dalmar, Abdirisak Ahmed
    et al.
    Hussein, Abdullahi Sheik
    Walhad, Said Ahmed
    Ibrahim, Abdirashid Omer
    Abdi, Abshir Ali
    Ali, Mohamed Khalid
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Wall, Stig
    Rebuilding research capacity in fragile states: the case of a Somali-Swedish global health initiative2017In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 1348693Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents an initiative to revive the previous Somali-Swedish Research Cooperation, which started in 1981 and was cut short by the civil war in Somalia. A programme focusing on research capacity building in the health sector is currently underway through the work of an alliance of three partner groups: six new Somali universities, five Swedish universities, and Somali diaspora professionals. Somali ownership is key to the sustainability of the programme, as is close collaboration with Somali health ministries. The programme aims to develop a model for working collaboratively across regions and cultural barriers within fragile states, with the goal of creating hope and energy. It is based on the conviction that health research has a key role in rebuilding national health services and trusted institutions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 35.
    Egal, Jama Ali
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Care Sciences. Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Essa, Amina
    University of Hargeisa, Somaliland.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health. Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Facility-based maternal deaths: Their prevalence, causes and underlying circumstances. A mixed method study from the national referral hospital of Somaliland2023In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 37, article id 100862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: Somaliland has one of the highest rates of maternal deaths in the world. An estimated 732 women die for every 100,000 live births. This study aims to identify the prevalence of facility-based maternal deaths, the causes and their underlying circumstances by interviewing relatives and health care providers at the main referral hospital.

    METHOD: A hospital-based mixed method study. The prospective cross-sectional design of the WHO Maternal Near Miss tool was combined with narrative interviews with 28 relatives and 28 health care providers in direct contact with maternal deaths. The quantitative data was analysed with descriptive statistics using SPSS and the qualitative part of the study was analysed with content analysis using NVivo.

    RESULTS: From the 6658 women included 28 women died. The highest direct cause of maternal death was severe obstetric haemorrhage (46.4%), followed by hypertensive disorders (25%) and severe sepsis (10.7%). An indirect obstetric cause of death was medical complications (17.9%). Twenty-five per cent of these cases were admitted to ICU and 89% had referred themselves to the hospital for treatment. The qualitative data identifies two categories of missed opportunities that could have prevented these maternal mortalities: poor risk awareness in the community and inadequate interprofessional collaboration at the hospital.

    CONCLUSION: The referral system needs to be strengthened utilizing Traditional Birth Attendants as community resource supporting the community facilities. The communication skills and interprofessional collaboration of the health care providers at the hospital needs to be addressed and a national maternal death surveillance system needs to be commenced.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 36.
    Egal, Jama Ali
    et al.
    Lead Department of Midwifery, College of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Hargeisa, Hargeisa, Somaliland.
    Essa, Amina
    Lead Department of Midwifery, College of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Hargeisa, Hargeisa, Somaliland.
    Yusuf, Rahma
    Lead Department of Midwifery, College of Medicine & Health Sciences, University of Hargeisa, Hargeisa, Somaliland.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Ereg, Derie
    College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Hargeisa, Hargeisa, Somaliland.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    A lack of reproductive agency in facility-based births makes home births a first choice regardless of potential risks and medical needs: a qualitative study among multiparous women in Somaliland2022In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 2054110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Around 20% of births in Somaliland take place at health facilities staffed by trained healthcare professionals; 80% take place at home assisted by Traditional Birth Attendants (TBAs) with no formal training. There has been no research into women's choice of place of birth.

    OBJECTIVE: In this study, we explore multipara women's needs and preferences when choosing the place of birth.

    METHOD: An explorative qualitative study using individual in-depth interviews analysed inductively using content analysis. The interviews were conducted in Somaliland with 25 multiparous women who had experience of giving birth both at home and at a health facility within the past three years.

    RESULTS: The results provide a description of how, for women in Somaliland, a lack of reproductive agency in facility-based births makes home births a first choice regardless of potential risks and medical need. The women in this study desired intentionality in their role as mothers and sought some measure of control over the environment where they planned to give birth, depending on the circumstances of that particular birth. The results describe what quality care means for multipara women in Somaliland and how women choose birthplace based on previous experiences of care. The expectation of respectful care was a vital part for women when choosing a place of birth.

    CONCLUSION: To meet women's needs and preferences in Somaliland, further investments are needed to strengthen the midwifery profession and to define and test a context specific midwife-led continuity of care model to be scaled up. A dialogue to create new roles and responsibilities for the TBAs who attend most home births is further needed to link them to the formal healthcare system and assure timely healthcare seeking during pregnancy and birth.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 37.
    Egal, Jama Ali
    et al.
    University of Hargeisa College of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Essa, Amina
    University of Hargeisa College of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Yusuf, Rahma
    University of Hargeisa College of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Lack of autonomy in facility-based births makes women become absentees of maternity services in Somaliland fragile contexts - a qualitative study2021In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Egal, Jama Ali
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Care Sciences. Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Hargeisa, Hargeisa, Somaliland.
    Kiruja, Jonah
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Care Sciences. College of Medicine and Health Science, University of Hargeisa, Hargeisa, Somaliland.
    Litorp, Helena
    Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Incidence and causes of severe maternal outcomes in Somaliland using the sub-Saharan Africa maternal near-miss criteria: A prospective cross-sectional study in a national referral hospital.2022In: International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics, ISSN 0020-7292, E-ISSN 1879-3479, Vol. 159, no 3, p. 856-864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the incidence and causes of severe maternal outcomes and the unmet need for life-saving obstetric interventions among women admitted for delivery in a referral hospital in Somaliland.

    METHODS: A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted from April 15, 2019, to March 31, 2020, with women admitted during pregnancy or childbirth or within 42 days after delivery. Data was collected using the World Health Organization (WHO) and sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) maternal near-miss (MNM) tools. Descriptive analysis was performed by computing frequencies, proportions and ratios.

    RESULTS: The MNM ratio were 56 (SSA criteria) and 13 (WHO criteria) per 1,000 live births. The mortality index was highest among women with medical complications (63%), followed by obstetric haemorrhage (13%), pregnancy-related infection (10%) and hypertensive disorders (7.9%) according to the SSA MNM criteria. Most women giving birth received prophylactic oxytocin for postpartum haemorrhage prevention (97%), and most laparotomies (60%) for ruptured uterus were conducted after three hours.

    CONCLUSION: There is a need to improve the quality of maternal health services through implementation of evidence-based obstetric interventions and continuous in-service training for health care providers. Using the SSA MNM criteria could facilitate such preventive measures in this setting as well as similar low-resource contexts.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 39. Egeh, Abdi-Aziz
    et al.
    Dugsieh, Osman
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    The views of Somali religious leaders on birth spacing: A qualitative study2019In: Sexual & Reproductive HealthCare, ISSN 1877-5756, E-ISSN 1877-5764, Vol. 20, p. 27-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Birth spacing is an important health intervention for women to attain good physical and mental health. In Somalia, religious leaders play a decisive role in approving or rejecting the use of family planning.

    Objective

    The study aimed to investigate Somali Islamic religious leaders’ views on birth spacing.

    Method

    Qualitative individual interviews were conducted with 17 Somali Islamic religious leaders aged 28–59 years and analysed through content analysis.

    Results

    The main category that emerged from the analysis was that the concept “birth spacing should be used and nor family planning to be in accordance with the Islamic religion. Two perspectives of views of birth spacing were identified: accepted ways and unaccepted ways. The accepted ways include breastfeeding, use of contraceptives causing no harm to the women’s health, and coitus interruptus. The preferred method should be determined by a joint agreement between the husband and wife, and that Muslim doctors should play a key role while the couples investigate their preferred method. Using contraceptives with the intention to limit the number of children was against Islamic values and practice. In addition, it was believed that using condoms promoted the temptation to engage in sex outside the marriage and was therefore prohibited.

    Conclusion

    According to the religious Islamic leaders, selected practice recommendations for contraceptive use is permitted in relation to birth spacing to promote the health of the mother and child. When providing professional contraceptive counselling to Muslim women, the word “birth spacing” is recommended to be used instead of “family planning”.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 40. Ekström, Annika
    et al.
    Tamang, Laxmi
    Pedersen, Christina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    van Teijlingen, Edwin
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Health care provider's perspectives on the content and structure of a culturally tailored antenatal care programme to expectant parents and family members in Nepal2020In: Journal of Asian Midwives, ISSN 2409-2290, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 23-44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Bangladesh is Launching the First Ever Net Based Master’s Programme in Asia for Midwifery Faculty Members2016In: Journal of Asian Midwives (JAM), ISSN 2409-2290, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 5-6Article in journal (Other academic)
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 42.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Barnmorskor i Bangladesh går nätbaserad masterutbildning på Högskolan Dalarna2016In: Jordemodern, ISSN 0021-7468, no 11, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 43.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Care of the newborn infant during maternal-infant separation: the father as primary caregiver immediately after birth and the mother's experiences of separation and later reunion with the infant2009Book (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Mothers’ lived experience of losing their baby at birth: A qualitative interview study in Somaliland using a phenomenological approach2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Allvin, M. K.
    Over 200 Dalarna University alumni help advance education and care in Africa and Asia: A Short communication2023In: Journal of Asian Midwives, ISSN 2409-2290, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 58-61Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Aveln, Pernilla
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Säflund, Karin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Wredling, Regina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Rådestad, Ingela
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Siblings’ farewell to a stillborn sister or brother and parents’ support to their older children: a questionnaire study from the parents’ perspective2010In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 151-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to capture parental descriptions of how siblings take leave of and mourn a stillborn brother or sister and how their parents support them. Data were collected by questionnaires from 16 parents of siblings to a stillborn child one year after the stillbirth. Data were analysed numerically for the multiple-choice questions and content analysis was used for parental comments and descriptions. The results describe siblings’ farewell to a stillborn brother or sister and how their parents in the midst of their own grief were involved in supporting siblings’ wellbeing, and observed their mourning reactions. Although the findings need to be interpreted with caution, they may provide insight that enables staff to become more sensitive to the whole family experience in the practice of their profession. Further research into siblings’ grief and parental support after stillbirth is crucial so that further light may be shed on their situation.

  • 47.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Borneskog, Catrin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Pedersen, Christina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Ternström, Elin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Tamang, Laxmi
    Niraula, Goma
    Mehra, Devika
    Mehra, Sunil
    Sharma, Shivangi
    Lindgren, Helena
    Strengthening the integration of midwifery in health systems; a leader-to-leader collaboration.2023In: Journal of Asian Midwives, ISSN 2409-2290, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 68-73, article id 9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Barriers and facilitators for quality midwifery care exist on different levels in the health systems. After decades of challenges and varied degrees of success, a stakeholder leader-to-leader collaboration could provide added value through knowledge sharing on how to integrate the midwifery cadre into an existing health system. Initiated by The Midwifery Society of Nepal, Dalarna University Sweden and MAMTA-Health Institute for Mother and Child India, a research network focusing midwifery has been formed. The background, purpose and activities of this network has been described in this News and Events paper.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 48.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Borneskog, Catrin
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Pedersen, Christina
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Bangladesh to take over the training of midwifery educators: A Commentary Paper2023In: Journal of Asian Midwives, ISSN 2409-2290, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 44-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While Bangladesh has made gains in maternal health provisions, there are still gaps and unmet need for services. Bangladesh has trained over 7 000 midwives, and many more midwifery educators are needed to serve the country’s population of 140 million with midwifery services. In April 2016 the first nursing faculty teaching midwifery students at nursing institutes across Bangladesh were enrolled in a blended online and onsite master’s programme with the Dalarna University, Sweden. The programme content focused the subject sexual, reproductive and perinatal health and was the first of its kind in Asia. The graduating faculty members were expected to be in a position to deliver higher quality education to the midwifery students (1, 2). To date, the team of teachers from Dalarna University has trained 150 midwifery educators (3). The current proposal from the University is that an equivalent to the Swedish Master's programme should be established in Bangladesh. While Bangladesh has made gains in education of midwives, there are still gaps and unmet need for educators with skills and knowledge in the subject of midwifery. During a period of transition, open seminars will be held at Dalarna University for all alumni who want to attend, with the hope on the part of the team of Dalarna university teachers being that they provide inspiration for high-quality midwifery education in Bangladesh. © 2023, South Asian Midwives Association (SAMA). All rights reserved.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 49.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Byrskog, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Osman, Fatumo
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Pedersen, Christina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sexual Reproductive Perinatal Health.
    Evaluating a model for the capacity building of midwifery eduators in Bangladesh through a blended, web-based master's programme2019In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1652022Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: While setting international standards for midwifery education has attracted considerable global attention, the education and training of midwifery educators has been relatively neglected, particularly in low-resource settings where capacity building is crucial. Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the expectations of midwifery educators in Bangladesh who took part in a blended web-based master's programme in SRHR and the extent to which these were realized after 12 months of part-time study. Methods: Both quantitative and qualitative methods have been used to collect data. A structured baseline questionnaire was distributed to all participants at the start of the first course (n = 30) and a second endpoint questionnaire was distributed after they (n = 29) had completed the core courses one year later. At the start of the first course, five focus group discussions (FGD) were held with the midwifery educators. Descriptive statistics and content analysis were used for the analyses. Results: Midwifery educators who took part in the study identified expectations that can be grouped into three distinct areas. They hoped to become more familiar with technology, anticipated they would learn pedagogical and other skills that would enable them to better support their students' learning and thought they might acquire skills to empower their students as human beings. Participants reported they realized these ambitions, attributing the master's programme with helping them take responsibility for their own teaching and learning, showing them how to enhance their students' learning and how to foster reflective and critical thinking among them. Conclusions: Midwifery educators have taken part in a creative learning environment which has developed their engagement in teaching and learning. They have done this using a blended learning model which combines online learning with face-to-face contact. This model can be scaled up in low resource and remote settings.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 50.
    Erlandsson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet; Mälardalen University.
    Christensson, Kyllike
    Dsilna, Ann
    Jonsson, Baldvin
    Do caregiving models after caesarean birth influence the infant's breathing adaptation and crying? A pilote study2008In: Journal of Children's and Young People's Nursing, ISSN 1753-1594, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 7-12Article in journal (Refereed)
123 1 - 50 of 115
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf