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  • 1.
    Elvhage, Gudrun
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    They call me "Mum"2013In: Becoming a social worker: Narratives from Around the World / [ed] Cree, Vivianne, Edinburgh: Routledge, 2013, p. 70-77Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is a book about social workers and social work. It tells the story of the journey into and through social work of people from around the world living and working in social work today. We hear what has brought them into social work and what has kept them in it since. Their lively accounts demonstrate that commitment and passion remain at the heart of social work today. This new edition of Becoming a Social Worker is made up of entirely new stories. It describes what it is like to be a social worker in a range of different practice settings in different countries. While many of the narratives are from practitioners and educators who either grew up in, or came as adults to, the UK, half of the narratives explores the experiences of social workers and educators working in different parts of the world in countries as diverse as Australia and New Zealand, India and Bangladesh, Ireland, Sweden and Eastern Europe, Nigeria, the USA and Canada. The book ends with a commentary, which argues that social work is truly a global profession.Some of the contributors will be recognised as those who have played a key part in shaping social work over the years and they provide valuable insights into how the profession has developed over time. Other contributors, less well known but no less interesting, give a vivid account of the challenges that social work education and practice face, and the shared values that underpin social work wherever it is located. Social work is a demanding and difficult job that goes largely unseen within society. We only ever hear about social work and social workers when something goes wrong and a vulnerable adult or child is hurt. Becoming a Social Worker sets out to change that - to make social work visible, so that those considering a career in the caring professions across the world can make an informed choice about whether social work is the career for them.

  • 2.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Lunds universitet, Socialhögskolan.
    Att bli, att vara och att ha varit - om ingångar i och utgångar ur Jehovas vittnen i Sverige2007Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Summary

    To become, to be and to have been: about the  Jehovah’s Witnesses

    The Watchtower Bible and Tract Society, in the following text referred to as the Jehovah’s Witnesses or “the organisation”, is a worldwide Christian organisation with about 6.7 million members. The organisation has many times, without any success so far, proclaimed Armageddon when they expect Jehovah to return to Earth. They interpret the Bible in their own, often very literal way, and require their members to live according to these interpretations. Among the consequences of this, members are forbidden to vote, to do military service or to receive blood transfusions. Apart from attending the three weekly meetings, members are expected to be active in missionary work, known as “publishing”. If a member fails to do a certain number of hours’ publishing, he or she risks being deprived of active membership status

    Sweden in general is considered to be a society where the population is not very religious. The formerly state-governed Lutheran church has lost its influence and the vast majority of ordinary Swedes do not visit church on other occasions than weddings, funerals or christenings. Expressing one’s own religious values has become somewhat of a private matter where publicity is seldom appreciated, which is contrary to the practice of the Jehovah’s Witnesses. This is one of the reasons why the Jehovah’s Witnesses are commonly perceived by average Swedes as a “suspicious” religious organisation.

    The aim and methods of the study

    This dissertation seeks to describe and investigate the entering and leaving of a highly structured and hierarchical religious community, exemplified in this case by the Jehovah’s Witnesses. What are the thoughts and aspirations of someone who is considering becoming a Jehovah’s Witness? What are the priorities and what experiences seem important when a person is going through such a process? And when this person has finally reached his or her goal of becoming a member, is it the same motivation that makes him or her stay in the organisation for longer periods of time, possibly for the rest of their lives, or does it change during the process of entering, or does this motivation change its character during the transition from entering to being a regular member?

    Why do some of the members change their attitude to the Jehovah’s Witnesses from rejoicing to bitterness? And how does this process of exit manifest itself? In what way is it different from the process of entry?

    The respondents in this study were chosen from both active members of the Jehovah’s Witnesses in Sweden and those who have left the organisation for personal reasons. Repeated interviews with ten active members of the organisation have been conducted in the course of the study and compared to equal numbers of former members. The interviews have been semi-structured to deal with questions of how a person has come into contact with the organisation; how they retrospectively experienced the process of entry; the reasons for becoming a member. Questions have also been asked about life in the organisation. The group of “exiters” have also been asked about the experience of leaving, why they wanted to leave, and how this process was started and carried out.

    In addition to this I have analysed a four-year diary describing the time inside and the process of leaving the organisation. This has given me an extra psychological insight into the inner experience of someone who has gone through the whole process.

    The analysis has been done by categorising the content of the transcribed interviews. An attempt to outline a model of an entry and exit process has been made, based on ideas and interpretations presented in the interviews. The analysis of the diary has involved thorough reading, resulting in a division of it into four different parts, where each part has been given a certain key-word, signifying the author’s emotional state when writing it. A great deal of the information about the Jehovah’s Witnesses has been collected through discussion boards on the Internet, informal talks with members and ex-members, interviews with representatives of the organisations during visits to its different offices (Bethels), such as St. Petersburg, Russia, and Brooklyn, New York, USA.

    The context

    Each organisation evolves in its own context with its own norms, roles and stories that would not survive outside it. With this as a starting point, there is a chapter dedicated to the description of the organisation’s history, structure and activities. It has been stated that the organisation’s treatment of its critical members and the strategies for recruiting new members have evolved over the years of its history. At the beginning there was an openness allowing members to be critical. As the structure of the organisation has become more rigid and formalised, the treatment of internal critics has become much less tolerated and exclusion has become a frequent option.

    As a rule many new members have been attracted to the organisation when (1) the day of Armageddon has been pronounced to be approaching; (2) the members of the organisation have been persecuted or threatened with persecution; and (3) the organisation has discovered a “new market”.

    The processes for entering and exiting

    How the entering processes manifest themselves depends on whether the person has been brought up in the organisation or not. A person converting as an adult has to pass six phases before being considered a Jehovah’s Witness by the organisation. These are:

     Contact with the Jehovah’s Witnesses,

    • Studying the bible with members of the organisation,
    • Questioning,
    • Accepting,
    • Being active as publisher (spreading the belief),
    • Being baptised.

     For a person brought up in the organisation, the process to full membership is much shorter:

     

    • Upbringing in the organisation,
    • Taking a stand on the belief,
    • Being baptised.

    The exit process contains of seven phases:

     

    • Different levels of doubts,
    • Testing of doubts,
    • Turning points,
    • Different kinds of decisions,
    • Different steps in executing the decisions,
    • Floating, a period of emotional and cognitive consideration of membership and its experiences,
    • Realtive neutrality.

     

    The process in and the process out are both slow and are accompanied with anguish and doubts. When a person is going through the process in or out of the organisation he or she experiences criticism. This is when people around the adept question the decision to continue in the process. The result of the criticism depends on where in the process the person is. If he or she is at the beginning of the process, the criticism will probably make the person insecure and the process will slow down or stop. If the criticism is pronounced in a later phase, the process will probably speed up.

    The norms of the organisation affect the behaviour of the members. There are techniques for inclusion that both bind members to the organisation and shield them off from the surrounding society. Examples of techniques for inclusion are the “work situation” and “closed doors”. The work situation signifies that members who do as the organisation recommends – doing simple work – often end up in the same branch of industry as many other Jehovah’s Witnesses. This often means that the person has other witnesses as workmates. If the person is unemployed or moves to another town it is easy to find a new job through connections in the organisation.

    Doubts and exclusions can lead to problems since they entail a risk of losing one’s job. This can also result in problems getting a new job. Jehovah’s Witnesses are not supposed to talk to excluded members, which of course mean difficulties working together. “Closed doors” means that members who do as the organisation recommends – not pursuing higher education, not engaging in civil society, working with a manual or in other way simple job, putting much time into the organisation – will, after a long life in the organisation, have problems starting a new life outside the Jehovah’s Witnesses.

    The language used in the organisation shows the community among the members, thus the language is one of the most important symbols. A special way of thinking is created through the language. It binds members to the organisation and sometimes it can work as a way to get back into the normative world of the organisation.

    Randall Collins’s (1990, 2004) thoughts about “emotional energy” have enabled an understanding of the solidarity and unity in the organisation. This also gives an understanding of the way the members treat doubting and critical members. The members who want to exit have to open up the binding/screening off. A possible way to do that is through language, to become aware of the effect the language might have. Another way is to search for emotional energy in another situation.

    During the exit process, shame might be of some importance. When members become aware of the shame they feel, because they perceive they are “acting a belief”, the exit process might accelerate.

  • 3.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Att lämna en värld: Om utgångsprocesser ur Jehovas vittnen2009In: Socialvetenskaplig tidskrift, ISSN 1104-1420, no 3-4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    It is an everyday experience to realize that things do not turn out the as expected. But what if you realize that everything you have so far experienced as reality is illusion? This article is about former members of the Jehovah’s Witnesses who have had doubts about what they previously believed to be the Truth. The article also treats the exit process, from being a Jehovah’s Witness to becoming an ex-Jehovah’s Witness. The data consists of twenty qualitative interviews with ten Jehovah’s Witnesses and twenty qualitative interviews with ten former Jehovah’s Witnesses. The data also include a diary written during four years preceding an exit from the organization. The analysis was made through thematic concentration. Ontologically the analysis and the article are based on a constructionist view though it is mainly empirical with no further theoretical assessment. However, to be able to understand the results a contextual frame is sketched with two factors affecting members who make an exit. First there are tying factors that bind the person closer to the organization; these are closeness and friendship and confirmation. A secluding factor is something that secludes the member from the outside society; these factors are the work situation and »closed doors«. With high values on these factors the exit process will be more arduous. The results are presented through a process model in which different phases or steps in the exit process are described. The following steps in the process are: (1) different levels of doubts; (2) trying out doubts; (3) turning points; (4) different decisions; (5) different steps in execution; (6) floating; (7) relative neutrality. The process is defined as an altogether ambivalent and emotionally tough experience, but other parts of life may be affected as well, such as employment, social life, family life and career.

  • 4.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Lunds universitet.
    Entrees and exits, their mechanisms and processes in the Jehovah's Witnesses, a study in the Swedish contex'2006In: Leaving religion, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Exporting teaching styles2012In: Social work education, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities in the Global North teach social work in the Global South from time to time. This paper aims to describe and discuss such projects from a pedagogical aspect, with a focus on teaching styles. Nine interviews were conducted with Swedish teachers who had experience of teaching in Iraqi Kurdistan. The paper sketches their strategies they developed during their period of teaching social work abroad.The teachers had different ways of handling the teaching situation and the styles were divided into three major types. These styles are referred to hereas Co-traveller, Therapeutic and Socratic.

  • 6.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Förord2012In: Människors beteende : perspektiv inom socialt arbete / [ed] Parrish, Margarete; Nilsson, Björn, Stockholm: Liber, 2012Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Interaktiv studiehandbok och mer material2010In: Förstå socialt arbete: Bengt Börjeson, Liber , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Vad är socialt arbete? Ja, den här boken ska göra det lite svårare för dig att ge ett svar på den frågan! Åtminstone ett enkelt svar. För socialt arbete är så mycket och så varierande. Att vara socialarbetare är att ha en arbetsuppgift och ett ansvar som kan vara livsavgörande för den människa man samarbetar med. Just därför är det sociala arbetet ett så fascinerande professionsfält! Med boken följer eLabbet, som är ett webbaserat studiestöd. eLabbet för Förstå socialt arbete innehåller ca 115 instuderingsfrågor och ca 10 relevanta praktikfall. Här kan man träna på viktiga ord, begrepp och fakta och få omedelbar feedback. Här kan man också tillämpa sina kunskaper på verklighetsorienterade praktikfall. eLabbet innehåller dessutom interaktiva kunskapstester med slumpade testfrågor där man kan repetera sina kunskaper samt få läs- och länktips.  Aktiveringskod följer med boken. För mer information om eLabbet samt inloggning, gå till www.liber.se/elabbet.Läs mer Det sociala arbetet lämnar inte den professionella aktören, socialarbetaren oberörd. Vi förändras och utvecklas med arbetet, och vi genomgår professionella kriser. Att vara socialarbetare innebär en utmaning och det vi sätter på spel är den egna personen och den egna självuppfattningen. Det sociala arbetet spänner över stora kunskapsområden och en mängd arbetsuppgifter, som kan vara av mycket olika karaktär. Vi befinner oss i ett spänningsfält mellan de stora sociala perspektiven på samhället och det psykologiska djupseendet beträffande den enskilda människan. Förstå socialt arbete är en grundbok om socialt arbete, som det finns skäl att återvända till under hela utbildningstiden. Den teoretiska grundtonen gör boken intressant även för praktiskt verksamma socialarbetare. Om författarna Bengt Börjeson är professor i socialt arbete vid Ersta Sköndal högskola. Under sin mångåriga karriär har han även varit professor i socialt arbete vid universiteten i Umeå och Stockholm, samt rektor för Lärarhögskolan i Stockholm. Han har också under många år arbetat vid och varit chef för Barnbyn Skå. eLabbet är utvecklat av Pernilla Liedgren Dobronravoff, lektor i socialt arbete vid Ersta Sköndal högskola.

  • 8.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Minorities with different values at school: the case of Jehovah's Witnesses2018In: British Journal of Religious Education, ISSN 0141-6200, E-ISSN 1740-7931, Vol. 40, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teachers in Swedish schools are to balance the values implemented by the law and at the same time try to respect the freedom of religion for the pupils. Aim of the study was to empirically investigate how teachers deal with pupils being Jehovah's Witnesses, a minority religion. Interviews with 11 informants who was members of Jehovah's Witnesses during the time in school (age 13 - 16) was conducted as well as interviews with two teachers as well as one school-psychologist and one school-counsellor. The study found that teachers often are lost in situation with children belonging to minority religion. Implications for practice are given.

  • 9.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Social work education as an export product: Example from Iraqi Kurdistan2010In: 12th UK Joint Social Work Education Conference with the 4th UK Social Work Research Conference: Shaping the future of social work, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Strategies among young Jehovah's Witnesses in secondary school in Sweden2013In: Religion in Scandinavia, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is among the most secular countries in the world and Jehovah’s Witness is a fundamentalist Christian organization with an ambition to present its interpretation of the Bible as truth. Emerging adults in Jehovah’s Witness are expected to behave and believe according to rules and a view of life which distinguish them from the values and teachings of the Swedish school.  The aim of the paper is to present strategies and reflections among Jehovah’s Witnesses in Swedish secondary school to meet the expectations of the religious community, when these are in conflict with the values and teachings of the school. Interviews with eleven former Jehovah’s Witnesses, now adults, have been conducted in the tradition of grounded theory. Strategies found where; 1) to stand up for their belief; 2) double standard and 3) flight. The reflections concern what it is to be an authentic person and the social context.

  • 11.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Transfer of teaching styles: Teaching social work in Iraqi Kurdistan as a swede2015In: International Social Work, ISSN 0020-8728, E-ISSN 1461-7234, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 175-185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Universities in the Global North teach social work in the Global South from time to time. This article aims to describe and discuss such projects from a pedagogical aspect, with a focus on teaching styles. Nine interviews were conducted with Swedish teachers who had experience of teaching in Iraqi Kurdistan. The article sketches their strategies they developed during their period of teaching social work abroad. The teachers had different ways of handling the teaching situation and the styles were divided into three major types. These styles are referred to here as Co-traveller, Therapeutic and Socratic.

  • 12.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Ersta Sköndal Högskola.
    Why the Jehovah's Witnesses are still growing2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Översyn magisterprogram i socialt arbete med inriktning evidensbaserat arbete med barn och unga2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport har som syfte att göra en översyn av magisterprogramet i evidensbaserat socialt arbetes första år. Intervjuer har genomförts med studenter, lärare samt representanter för arbetslivet (kommuner). I rapporten presenteras följande förlag; 1) Att avsluta fri-fart, fri-start upplägget och istället införa fast fart (25% alt. 50%)  takt för studierna. Kurserna kan fortfarande bestå av inspelade föreläsningar och ha en stor flexibilitet, inom terminsgränserna. 2) Att begränsa examinationerna till fem. 3) Att ha kvar distans/nätundervisningen och att uppmuntra kursansvariga att lägga in diskussionstrådar, chat, connectmöten och bjuda in studenter som bor nära studieorten att närvara vid streamade föreläsningar. 4) Att ge möjligheter till ett program. Att erbjuda magisterkurserna som fristående kurser som sedan vägs samman i en magisterexamen. 5) Att inrätta ett programråd där återkommande diskussioner förs kring socialarbetarnas utbildning, policyns implementering och vidarutveckling.

  • 14.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Andersson, Lars
    Ersta Sköndal högskola/ Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Strategies among young Jehovah’s Witnesses in compulsory school in Sweden, age 13-15, a case-study2013In: International Journal for the Study of New Religions, ISSN 2041-9511, E-ISSN 2041-952X, Vol. 4, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated how young teenagers, as members of a strong religious organization, dealt with the school situation and the encounter with mainstream culture taking place at school during the final years in Swedish primary school (age 13-15 years). The purpose was to explore possible strategies that members of a minority group, in this case the Jehovah’s Witnesses, developed in order to deal with a value system differing from that of the group. We interviewed eleven former members of the Jehovah’s Witnesses about their final years in compulsory Swedish communal school. The ages of the interviewees ranged between 24 and 46 years, and the interviewed group comprised six men and five women. Nine of the eleven interviewees had grown up in the countryside or in villages. All but two were ethnic Swedes. The time that had passed since leaving the movement ranged from quite recently to 20 years. The results revealed three strategies; Standing up for Your Beliefs, Escaping, and Living in Two Worlds. The first two strategies are based on a One-World View, and the third strategy, Living in Two Worlds, implies a Two-World View, accepting to a certain extent both the Jehovah’s Witnesses outlook as well as that of ordinary society. The strategy Standing up for Your Beliefs can be described as straightforward, outspoken, and bold; the youngsters did not show any doubts about their belief. The second subgroup showed an unshakeable faith, but suffered psychological stress since their intentions to live according to their belief led to insecurity in terms of how to behave, and also left them quite isolated. These people reported more absence from school. The youngsters using the strategy Living in Two Worlds appeared to possess the ability to sympathize with both world views, and were more adaptable in different situations.

  • 15.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Andersson, Lars
    Ersta Sköndal högskola, Ersta Sköndal university college.
    Strategies among young Jehovah's Witnesses in primary school, age 13 - 152012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Andersson, Lars
    Ersta Sköndal högskola, Ersta Sköndal university college.
    Strategies among young Jehovah's Witnesses in secondary school in Sweden2012In: Religion and Young to Middle Aged Adults, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is among the most secular countries in the world and Jehovah’s Witness is a fundamentalist Christian organization with an ambition to present its interpretation of the Bible as truth. Emerging adults in Jehovah’s Witness are expected to behave and believe according to rules and a view of life which distinguish them from the values and teachings of the Swedish school.  The aim of the paper is to present strategies and reflections among Jehovah’s Witnesses in Swedish secondary school to meet the expectations of the religious community, when these are in conflict with the values and teachings of the school. Interviews with eleven former Jehovah’s Witnesses, now adults, have been conducted in the tradition of grounded theory. Strategies found where; 1) to stand up for their belief; 2) double standard and 3) flight. The reflections concern what it is to be an authentic person and the social context.

  • 17.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Elvhage, Gudrun
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Expectations, attitudes and motives among future social workers in Sweden: students in social work2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The intended aim of this paperis to discuss motivation and personal traits among social work students andimplication to international social work. An enquiry was made to investigatethe motivation, values and expectation among first year social work students atfour universities in Sweden. There is previous evidence that education havedifficulties forming students values, and the effect follows that it isbecoming vital to attract and accept the best students for the profession. Oneof the investigated universities did have a different form of admission systemsince half of their students were accepted after a test and an interview. Thepresentation aims to present results from the survey as well as discuss how theresults of the Swedish social work students differed in between theuniversities and from international research of social work students.

  • 18.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Elvhage, Gudrun
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Knowledge support in communities for social workers in Sweden2012In: Empowerment in social work, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Elvhage, Gudrun
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Motiv, förutsättningar och värderingar hos socionomstudenter2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    I nordiska sammanhang är det lite känt om socialarbetares attityder till arbetsvillkor och pågående sociala och politiska trender. Socialarbetare som yrkesgrupp kan betraktas som aktörer som praktiskt ska tolka och genomföra socialpolitik. Resultatet från en omfattande nordisk studie visade att socialarbetarnas attityder varierade inom olika specialiseringar inom kommunal socialtjänst. De socialarbetare som arbetade med ekonomisk hantering var mer missnöjda med sin arbetssituation och mer positiva till sanktioner och restriktioner mot klienter jämfört med kollegor inom andra verksamhetsområden. De är mer benägna att förklara fattigdom med hänvisning till enskilda brister. Vidare visar forskning att socialarbetare inte ser den nordiska modellen som att den underlättar för utsatta människor mer än andra välfärdssystem. Många socialarbetare menar att socialt arbete präglas av ekonomiska omständigheter och en byråkratisk administration. I vår studie diskuterar vi socionomstudenternas motiv och värderingar och jämför med vad uppdragsgivare eftertraktar av professionen. Är det, som några forskare pekar på, att uppdragsgivare, främst kommuner efterfrågar socionomer med framförallt kunskaper i juridik och som kan hantera byråkrati och inte det som vi ser i vår studie socionomstuderande med altruistiska motiv. I den meningen kan diskrepansen mellan ett rationellt kommunalt perspektiv och studenternas altruistiska motiv få konsekvenser.

    Ett frågeformulär utvecklades för studenterna och lämnades till dem i början av deras socionomutbildning. Studien genomfördes på fyra olika universitet och högskolor i Sverige och sammanlagt svarade 250 studenter på enkäten. Frågeformuläret som innehöll både fasta och öppna svarsalternativ har bearbetats med hjälp av statistikprogrammet SPSS och de öppna svaren har kategoriserats.

    Resultatet från den kvantitativa undersökningen av studenter på fyra olika socionomutbildningar i Sverige visar att studenters motivation och värderingar är relativt homogena mellan de fyra utbildningsorterna. Det skiljer sig åt när de gäller de mindre högskolorna när det gäller motiv. Ungefär en tredjedel av studenterna anger idealistiska motiv för sitt yrkesval. Lika många en tredjedel av studenterna uppvisar individualistiska motiv och värderingar medan en del av studenterna varken är idealistiska eller individualistiska utan anger att socionomyrkesvalet är ett yrkesval för att få ett arbete. När studenterna anger vilken professionell roll som de helst vill tillskriva sig som socionom anger de i första hand empatisk, kompetent och att bli en god lyssnare.

    I vår presentation diskuterar vi elevernas värderingar och förväntningar i förhållande till sin framtida professionella identitet som socionom samt deras personliga motiv för att välja utbildningen till socionom. Vi presenterar också hur resultatet av de svenska studenternas motiv skiljer sig från internationell forskning men diskuterar också hur socionomstudenter skiljer sig åt i ett nationellt perspektiv.

  • 20.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Elvhage, Gudrun
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Kullberg, Christian
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    The use of decision support systems in social work: a scoping study literature review2016In: Journal of Evidence-Informed Social Work, ISSN 2376-1407, E-ISSN 2376-1415, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decision support systems are known to be helpful for professionals in many medical professions. In social work, decision support systems have had modest use, accompanied by strong criticism from the profession but often by praise from political management. In this study the aim of the authors was to collect and report on the published evidence on decision support systems in social work. The conclusion of the authors is that a decision support system gives support to social workers in conducting a thorough investigation, but at the same time gives them the freedom to make autonomous decisions that might be the most helpful for and used by social workers. Their results also indicate that decision support systems focusing on atypical rather than typical cases are perceived as the most useful among experienced staff.

  • 21.
    Liedgren, Pernilla
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kullberg, Christian
    Evidensbaserad praktik i svenskt socialt arbete: En forskningsöversikt och ett förslag till fortsatt forskning2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Denna rapport presenterar en översikt av forskning om evidensbaserad praktik (EBP) i svenskt socialt arbete inom den kommunala socialtjänsten och andra verksamheter inom den svenska socialvården. Syftet är att beskriva forskningsläget om EBP i socialt arbete samt ge förslag till fortsatt forskning på området. I rapporten redovisas forskning om stöd, attityder och förhållningssätt till det evidensbaserade arbetet med fokus på organisation, chefer och första linjens socialarbetare. Resultaten visar att genomförandet av EBP i socialt arbete till stora delar styrts centralt av Socialstyrelsen. Den EBP-version som på detta sätt prioriterats och spridits skulle kunna kallas en guideline-modell. Forskning visar också att svenska socialarbetares anpassning till ett EBP-koncept enligt guideline-modell är relativt svagt. Trots det är socialarbetare liksom sina chefer överlag allmänt positiva till EBP, men det finns också en relativt stark oro för att den version av EBP som sprids av Socialstyrelsen är för rigorös för att passa praktiskt socialt arbete. Mot bakgrund av det fokus som forskningen haft och de kunskapsluckor som finns om socialarbetares förhållande till en reflekterande praktiker-modell avslutas rapporten med att ge ett förslag på framtida möjliga forskningsfrågor utifrån detta perspektiv.

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