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  • 1.
    Berg, Jan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production. Luleå University of Technology, Sonic Studio, Interactive Institute, Piteå, Sweden.
    Perceived properties of parameterised music for interactive applications2006In: Journal of Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, ISSN 1690-4524, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 65-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditional implementations of sound and music in interactive contexts have their limitations. One way to overcome these and to expand the possibilities of music is to handle the music in a parameterised form. To better understand the properties of the musical parameters resulting from parameterisation, two experiments were carried out. The first experiment investigated selected parameters’ capability to change the music; the second experiment examined how the parameters can contribute to express emotions. From these experiments, it is concluded that users without musical training perform differently from musicians on some of the parameters. There is also a clear association between the parameters and the expressed basic emotions. The paper is concluded with observations on how parameterisation might be used in interactive applications.

  • 2.
    Berg, Jan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Relations between musical parameters and expressed emotions: extending the potential of computer entertainment2005In: Proceedings of ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology ACE 2005 / [ed] S. Zhou, Z. Ying & L.S. Ping, New York: ACM Press, 2005, p. 164-171Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Berg, Jan
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    Lindberg, Stefan
    Perceived properties of parameterised music for interactive applications2005In: WMSCI Proceedings 2005 : July 10 - 13, 2005, Orlando, Florida, USA, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Lefford, Nyssim
    et al.
    Interactive Institute, Studio Sonic, Piteå, Sweden.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Sjömark, Ceciia
    Context, individuality and music's affect on listeners2005In: Proceedings of CONTEXT'05, the Fifth International and Interdisciplinary Conference on Modeling and Using Context, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Lindeborg, Ronny
    et al.
    Kungl. Musikhögskolan, Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Kungl. Musikhögskolan/Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Jympa som musikalisk aktivitet2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Lindgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, French.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Johansson, Sören
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Röstljud i onlinekurser: Charlotte Lindgren samtalar med Johnny Wingstedt om NGL-projektet som handlar om röstljudets estetiska potential i lärandesituationer online.2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7. Nykanen, Arne
    et al.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Sundhage, Johan
    Mohlin, Peter
    Sketching sounds: kinds of listening and their functions in designing2015In: Design Studies, ISSN 0142-694X, E-ISSN 1872-6909, Vol. 39, p. 19-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, the use of sketching in sound design was studied. Based on Schon and Wiggins' model of how designers use sketching to see, move, and see again, we suggest that sound design evolves through a similar process requiring listening, moving, and listening again. This is facilitated by considering sounds as sketches. A case was followed in which six designers were asked to design a sound logotype. Processes and interactions were studied. The results suggest that sound design can be considered as a listen move listen process. Sound design is a conversation with sounding material, crucially dependent on listening. To assist in this, a computer interface was developed. Analysis of its use suggests that it supported co-designing. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 8.
    Nykänen, Arne
    et al.
    LTU.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Sundhage, Johan
    Klevgränd.
    Mohlin, Peter
    Semcon.
    Sketching sounds: listening, moving and listening again2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9. Sjömark, Cecilia
    et al.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Axelsson, Karin
    Berg, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Musical parameters for promoting relaxation and stress-reduction in listeners2005In: Proceedings of Ambience 05, International Scientific Conference on Intelligence Ambience and Well-Being, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Ternhag, Gunnar
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Wingstedt, JohnnyDalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    På tal om musikproduktion: elva bidrag till ett nytt kunskapsområde2012Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Kungl. Musikhögskolan; Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Alternativa startpunkter1999In: Språk, Musik, Undervisning: Olika startpunkter / [ed] Tore West, KMH Förlaget , 1999, 1, p. 9-18Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Kungl. Musikhögskolan / Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Analyzing narrative functions of music in film and other multimodal expressions2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13. Wingstedt, Johnny
    Do we learn music from playing computer games?2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Exploring knowledge of music in multimodal narrative settings2013In: Multimodalities: Book of abstracts, 2013, p. 14-14Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Music, used for narrative purposes in multimodal settings such as film, television and computer games is becoming one of the largest sources of musical experience in contemporary society. Although typically experienced on an unconscious and unreflected level, this kind of music actively contributes narrative meaning in multimodal interplay with other representational modes such as moving image, speech and sound effects. It seems that by engaging in social activities such as watching movies and playing computer games, we learn how to make sense of such musical functions, gaining knowledge necessary for interpreting stories multimodally told (Wingstedt, Brändström & Berg, 2010). A study was performed to make available for observation representations of knowledge, what could be described as ‘evidence of learning‘ of musical narrative functions (Wingstedt, 2008; Wingstedt, Brändström & Berg, 2008). A software tool (REMUPP) was designed, where seven musical parameters (semiotic resources of music) could modify musical expression in real time. Twenty-three participants, 12-13 years old, were given the task of designing music to fit different 3D-animated visual settings. They also answered a questionnaire giving information about their musical training and media habits. After each session they were interviewed in a stimulated recall situation, where they commented on their achieved musical expressions. Numerical data from the software was used to analyse textual aspects of the musical expressions, actualising ideational and interpersonal meanings. This was combined with analyses of the interviews and results of the questionnaires. The results indicated clearly expressed knowledge of culturally available musical narrative conventions. Combining analyses of the verbal expressions with the musical expressions contributed to a fuller and more nuanced account of the participants’ expressed musical knowledge. The results showed strong correlations to factors such as the participants’ musical backgrounds and habits of playing computer games and watching movies – highlighting the impact of the increasing availability of narrative media on our attitudes and knowledge.

  • 15.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Expressing values and attitudes in the advertising jingle through the interplay of music, voice and lyrics2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Film music and interactivity1998In: From Awareness to Action, Proceedings from “Stockholm, Hey Listen!”, 1998Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    From Phonograph Records to Movies: The recontextualization of pre-existing music into film soundtracks2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Functions of narrative media music: a multimodal and social semiotic perspective2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Funktionell analys av musik i film och andra multimodalt berättande gestaltningar2012In: På tal om musikproduktion. Elva bidrag till ett nytt kunskapsområde / [ed] Ternhag, Gunnar; Wingstedt, Johnny, Göteborg: Bo Ejeby Förlag , 2012, p. 160-181Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Ideational meaning potentials of narrative media music2012In: 6th International Conference on Multimodality: Abstracts, 2012, p. 130-130Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The question of musical meaning has been controversial and much debated over the years, especially music’s ability to express any kind of ‘content’ or ideational meaning. Wingstedt (2005, 2008) and Wingstedt et al. (2010) have discussed how narrative media music (music in film, computer games etc) can be categorized into six basic narrative functions: the informative, descriptive, emotive, guiding, rhetorical and temporal functions. These can in turn be put in relation to Halliday’s three metafunctions of communicational meaning (ideational, interpersonal, textual). This paper/presentation will discuss how narrative media music can express ideational meanings in defined narrative contexts, in interaction with other modes such as moving image, speech and sound design. The ideational metafunction is the content dimension of communication, representing what goes on in the world, ‘who does what, with or to whom and where’ (Kress et al, 2001:9). In multimodal narrative settings, music will typically contribute ideational meaning by informative and descriptive functions. In performing informative functions, music will often make use of culturally known and recognizable features expressed through different genres or specific musical compositions or performances. Typical examples are how music is used to establish cultural settings, as when playing ‘French music’ when a filmic narrative cuts to a location set in Paris – or using musical style to convey certain time periods or to indicate social events or status. The descriptive functions of narrative media music are akin to programme music, a type of art music attempting to render an extra-musical setting or narrative. This includes setting out to metaphorically describe attributes of physical atmosphere or environment, such as ‘the ocean’, ‘the pastoral’ or ‘the city’ – or by mimetically expressing physical movement, a technique that, when emphasized, is known as Mickey Mousing. Also, expressing mental processes or ‘observed emotions’ (rather than ‘experienced’), can be seen as descriptive functions of music. Musical narrative tools such as the use of leitmotifs (a recurring motif associated with characters, places or ideas of the narrative) will function on both an informative and descriptive level, symbolically representing a specific phenomenon and at the same time describing its attributes. The dramaturgical position of the music as being either diegetic (part of the spatio-temporal world of the story) or non-diegetic will also affect how ideational meaning is manifested. The different functions will be illustrated by using examples from various film scenes.

  • 21.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    'If You Have Nothing To Say – Sing It!': On the Interplay of Music, Voice and Lyrics in the Advertising Jingle2017In: Music as Multimodal Discourse: Semiotics, Power and Protest / [ed] Lyndon C.S. Way and Simon McKerrell, London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2017, 1, p. 135-158Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    “If you’ve got nothing to say – sing it!”: On the interplay of music, voice and lyrics in the advertising jingle2014In: CADAAD 5: Abstract Book / [ed] Alexandra Fodor, Tamás Eitler, Judit Pethő-Szirmai, Kata Vadai, Beatrix Molnár, Budapest: Eötvös Loránd University , 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the early days of radio, music has been used to sell goods and establish brand identities (Taylor, 2012). From this, the practice of the advertising jingle has developed. Van Leeuwen (2005:106) states that “discourses consist of a version of social practice plus ideas about it and attitudes to it”. This presentation discusses and exemplifies how ideas and attitudes are expressed by combining music, voice and language in the advertising jingle. In examining discursive aspects of the jingle, different (or additional) factors must be taken into consideration compared with just looking at the spoken word. In combing words and music, each mode individually bears meaning but meaning also emerges from the interweaving of the modes involved (Wingstedt 2008, 2010).

    On a structural level, music will contribute means for time-based constructions different from what is usually found in ‘speech alone’. First, it makes possible repetition of chosen expressions such as product name, slogans or connotative keywords. Furthermore, musical meter, period, rhythm and phrasing provide frameworks for selected language components to achieve salience. An important feature for building brand identity is also how music can be made highly recognizable, often by means of melody.

    Interpersonally, pitch level or direction regulates aspects of engagement, attitude and energy, and connect directly to verbal content, making music perform what van Leeuwen (2005) calls “sound acts”. Metrical regularities or irregularities creates or breaks expectations, which involves and activates the listener. Advantage is also taken of music’s strong ability to express emotions and moods.

    Instrumentation, how music “dress up” (or down), and also musical genres, come with cultural or subcultural associations to attitudes, values and ideologies. Central to the sound of the jingle is the projection of the human voice, which carries both verbal, musical and other sound-specific qualities, as described by van Leeuwen (1999) and Machin (2010). All this, together with musical expression styles and production techniques, are used as means for establishing the “image” of a brand, based on how music can convey discourses on social status or authenticity. In the presentation, recordings are analysed and compared to illustrate how social practices, ideas and attitudes come together in music, voice and language.

  • 23.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Making music mean: on functions of, and knowledge about, narrative music in multimedia2008Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Media music as text: multimodality, metafunctions and narrative music2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Metafunktioner, dieges och interaktivitet2012In: På tal om musikproduktion. Elva bidrag till ett nytt kunskapsområde / [ed] Ternhag, Gunnar; Wingstedt, Johnny, Göteborg: Bo Ejeby Förlag , 2012, p. 182-196Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 26.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Music as a carrier of values, attitudes and ideologies in advertising: a multimodal discourse analysis2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Musical meaning in film: an intermedial perspective2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Musik som medel för att uttrycka värderingar, attityder och ideologier2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå tekniska universitet.
    Narrative functions of film music in a relational perspective2004In: Sound worlds to discover : proceedings, ISME 2004, 26th International Society for Music Education World Conference, 11-16 July 2004, Tenerife, Spain, International Society for Music Education , 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Kungl. Musikhögskolan; Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Narrative media music: functions and knowledge2010In: Music, Education and Innovation: Festschrift for Sture Brändström / [ed] Cecilia Ferm Thorgersen & Sidsel Karlsen, Luleå: Luleå tekniska universitet, 2010, 1, p. 53-66Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Kungl. Musikhögskolan/Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Narrative media music: functions and knowledge2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Narrative music: towards an understanding of musical narrative functions in multimedia2005Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 33. Wingstedt, Johnny
    REMUPP: A tool for investigating musical narrative functions2006In: Proceedings of the Audio Mosty Conference : a Conference on Sound in Games, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Resources of mediated voice quality in providing a sense of presence in online learning situations.2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Tecken på lärande om musikens berättande funktioner i multimodala kontexter2015In: Abstracts Mirac 2015 / [ed] Thomas Florén, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    The Aesthetic Potential of Vocal Sound in Online Learning Situations2018In: Multimodality and Aesthetics / [ed] Elise Seip Tønnessen & Frida Forsgren, London and New York: Routledge, 2018, 1, p. 186-200Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    The potential of sound to provide a sense of presence in online learning situations2014In: Next Generation Learning Conference, NGL 2014, March 19–20 2014, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden: Book of Abstract, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2014, p. 53-53Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contemporary society, important activities of our daily lives are increasingly audiovisually mediated such as in film, television, games, advertising etc. In these activities, principles for storytelling and communication are used, building on socially developed conventions (Wingstedt, 2008). The voice (dialogue or voice over) in audiovisual modes of communication is often used as a resource for contributing a sense of presence, engagement, identification and immersion. This paper presents the design and preliminary results of a pilot study, where the purpose was to investigate how narrative principles for audiovisual storytelling can be applied to online learning environments. Focus is primarily on how resources for mediating the human voice can contribute to a sense of presence and immersion in the learning situation. Theories of Multimodality (Kress, 2010) and Social semiotics (van Leeuwen, 1999, 2005, and others) are used as a point of departure. In using Halliday’s (1978) three metafunctions of communication as a model – describing communicational meaning as being ideational (content), interpersonal (interaction) and textual (structure) – this study focuses on how interpersonal meaning is realized through the mode of sound.  Empirical data was collected in two kinds of online learning situations: 1) Japanese language lessons, performed in real time, and; 2) recorded lectures in the course Analysis of music productions (in the Music- and sound design programme). As one important purpose of this pilot study was to evaluate the validity of the research method, it was decided to include these two disparate but common forms of online teaching/learning. In all, 16 lessons were evaluated. Half of the lessons were carried on “as usual”, using standard technical solutions for sound production and transmission. The other half of the lessons were “produced”, where aspects such as frequency range, sound level, noise, pitch and proximity were treated using professional audio technology and methods. The preferred sound ideal was not necessarily ”naturalism” but rather the heightened sense of ”hyper realism” often heard in film, where the voice sound is used to achieve a sense of immersion, continuity and presence. Each of the 16 lessons was followed by an online survey, where the students rated different communicational aspects of the session. In all, 147 individual surveys were collected. The preliminary results of these surveys will be presented, and an evaluation of different aspects of the research methodology will be discussed. 

  • 38.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Berg, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    Lindberg, Stefan
    REMUPP: An interface for evaluation of relations between musical parameters and perceived properties2005In: ACE '05 Proceedings of the 2005 ACM SIGCHI International Conference on Advances in computer entertainment technology / [ed] S. Zhou, Z. Ying & L.S. Ping, New York: ACM , 2005, p. 346-349Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    New media offers new roles, functions and challenges to music, calling for new methods and tools for music research. To meet these increasingly important challenges. REMUPP, a new software tool for the investigation of relations between music and perceived properties or characteristies, was designed. The ideas behind REMUPP and the technology used to realize it is deseribed. In order to test the sensitivity and validity of REMUPP. a simple experiment aimed to examine some properties of music was carried out. 38 subjects were listening to music and instructed to indicate their priority for different aspects of the music (musical parameters) while they actively controlled these aspects. The results show that REMUPP is able to bring out significant differences between the musical parameters, and that these differences correspond well with findings by others.

  • 39.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production. Department of music and media, Luleå University of Technology.
    Brändström, Sture
    Berg, Jan
    Making meaning of media music: expressions of knowledge about musical narrative functionsManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Royal College of Music, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Brändström, Sture
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Berg, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Narrative music, visuals and meaning in film2010In: Visual Communication, ISSN 1470-3572, E-ISSN 1741-3214, Vol. 9, no 2, p. 193-210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Narrative media music, music used for narrative purposes in multimedia such as film, television or computer games, is becoming one of the largest sources of musical experience in our daily lives. Though typically experienced on an unconscious and unreflected level, this kind of music actively contributes narrative meaning in multimodal interplay with image, speech and sound effects. Often, what we (think we) see is to a large degree determined by what we hear. Using Halliday’s (1978) metafunctions of communication as a starting point, two short film scenes (from Jaws and The Secret of My Success) are examined, with a focus on the intermodal relationships of music and image. The examples illustrate how musical and visual expressions combine to form multimodal statements where the whole is certainly different than the sum of the parts.

  • 41.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Luleå University of Technology, Royal college of music, Sweden.
    Brändström, Sture
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Berg, Jan
    Luleå University of Technology.
    Young adolescents’ usage of narrative functions of media music by manipulation of musical expression2008In: Psychology of Music, ISSN 0305-7356, E-ISSN 1741-3087, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 193-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates usage and knowledge of musical narrative functions in contemporary multimedia. A group of young adolescents were given the task of adapting musical expression, using the non-verbal research tool REMUPP, to fit different visual scenes shown on a computer screen. This was accomplished by manipulating seven musical parameters: instrumentation, tempo, harmonic complexity, rhythmic complexity, register, articulation and reverb. They also answered a questionnaire giving information about their musical training and media habits. Numerical data from the manipulation of the musical parameters were analysed to search for tendencies within the group with regard to the musical expression in relation to the different visual scenes shown. The results showed a large degree of in-group consensus regarding narrative functions of music, indicating knowledge about musical narrative codes and conventions. Also, the results were clearly influenced by factors such as the participants' musical training, gender and habits of music listening, playing computer games and watching movies — highlighting the complexity of learning and pointing to the impact of the increasing availability of narrative media on our attitudes and knowledge.

  • 42.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Florén, Thomas
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Ickeverbal kommunikation i studio2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Florén, Thomas
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Music Producers, Knowledge and Multimodal Communication in the Recording Studio2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This short paper presents and discusses an ongoing pilot project studying communication and collaboration between producers and singers in the recording studio. From a knowledge perspective, it is assumed that ’the formal, the informal and the tacit are embedded in and inseparable from the ongoing interaction of the participants’ (Heath, Luff & Knoblauch, 2004). It is therefore necessary to, in addition to the verbal/vocal, also examine multimodal and embodied means of social interaction – such as gesture, facial expression and gaze. In this, the specific conditions established by the mediated setting of studio communication via ’talkback’ systems and soundproofed glass windows are considered. Furthermore, the communicative use of artifacts, tools and technology needs to be studied, in order to get a deeper understanding of how creative and collaborative work is organized in the studio. This includes how the musical sound (live or recorded) and related technologies are used for interactional purposes besides mere artistic expression.

     

    The study of the activities in the studio is, on a micro level, being performed using multi-camera documentation and multimodal interaction analysis. On a macro level, in-depth interviews and stimulated recall sessions, focusing on the role of the producer, are used for getting the participants’ perspective on how they view their own role regarding e.g. situational, institutional, strategic and knowledge-related matters. Preliminary results touch on issues concerning how power relations, agency, status and (often tacit) knowledge are negotiated. The joint workflow of collaborative and creative processes, as well as communicative resources, choices, and strategies are illuminated. The continued plan for this project is to include a larger variety of proficiency and professional levels, and musical genres. Given the increase in studies on contemporary media societies, such as consumer habits, media cultures and technologies, more research is correspondingly called for on issues concerning collaborative media production processes.

     

    References

    Heath, C., Luff, P. & Knoblauch, H. (2004). Tools, technologies and organizational interaction: The emergence of "workplace studies." In D. Grant, C. Hardy, C. Oswick & L. Putman (Eds), The Handbook of Organizational Discourse (pp. 337-359). London: Sage. 

  • 44.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Sonic studio, Interactive Institute, Acusticum 4, SE-941 28 Piteå, Sweden, School of Music, Luleå University of Technlogy.
    Liljedahl, Mats
    Sonic studio, Interactive Institute, Acusticum 4, SE-941 28 Piteå, Sweden.
    Lindberg, Stefan
    Sonic studio, Interactive Institute, Acusticum 4, SE-941 28 Piteå, Sweden.
    Berg, Jan
    Sonic studio, Interactive Institute, Acusticum 4, SE-941 28 Piteå, Sweden, School of Music, Luleå University of Technlogy.
    REMUPP - an interactive tool for investigating musical properties and relations2005In: Proceedings of the 2005 International Conference on New Interfaces for Musical Expression (NIME05), Vancouver, BC, Canada / [ed] S. Fels & T. Blaine, 2005, p. 232-235Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A typical experiment design within the field of music psychology is playing music to a test subject who listens and reacts - most often by verbal means. One limitation of this kind of test is the inherent difficulty of measuring an emotional reaction in a laboratory setting. This paper describes the design, functions and possible uses of the software tool REMUPP (Relations between musical parameters and perceived properties), designed for investigating various aspects of musical experience. REMUPP allows for non-verbal examination of selected musical parameters (such as tonality, tempo, timbre, articulation, volume, register etc.) in a musical context. The musical control is put into the hands of the subject, introducing an element of creativity and enhancing the sense of immersion. Information acquired with REMUPP can be output as numerical data for statistical analysis, but the tool is also suited for the use with more qualitatively oriented methods.

  • 45.
    Wingstedt, Johnny
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Sound and Music Production.
    Lindeborg, Ronny
    Kungl. Musikhögskolan, Royal College of Music in Stockholm.
    Using music to design the Jympa group training experience2012Conference paper (Refereed)
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