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  • 1.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    So you think you can type: Knowledge performance in net-based learning2009In: National Forum for English Studies in Sweden, Malmö, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this workshop, we consider how the use of new media technologies in net-based education can facilitate or impair knowledge performance. Our examples come from net-based courses offered by the English Department at Högskolan Dalarna, and show different kinds of technologies and educational tools in use. The examples reflect not only the student perspective, but also a teacher perspective, in acknowledgement of the fact that teachers are also performers of knowledge and users of new media technologies. The goal of the workshop is to share experiences of both successful and unsuccessful performances of knowledge in the net-based education environment, and, by including both the student and teacher perspectives, encourage workshop participants to discuss how they and their students can more effectively interact with technology.

  • 2.
    Berglund, Eva
    et al.
    Barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Språkutveckling från 1-2½ år – utkast till modell2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Berglund, Eva
    et al.
    Barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Engdahl, Ingrid
    Barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga institutionen, Stockholms universitet.
    SPRINT och språkutvecklande arbete på förskolorna2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Att arbeta medvetet med ordförrådet2017Other (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English. Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Children's Vocabulary Development: The role of parental input, vocabulary composition and early communicative skills2014Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to examine the early vocabulary development of a sample of Swedish children in relation to parental input and early communicative skills. Three studies are situated in an overall description of early language development in children. The data analyzed in the thesis was collected within a larger project at Stockholm University (SPRINT- “Effects of enhanced parental input on young children’s vocabulary development and subsequent literacy development” [VR 2008-5094]).

    Data analysis was based on parental report via SECDI, the Swedish version of the MacArthur-Bates Communicative Development Inventories, and audio recordings. One study examined parental verbal interaction characteristics in three groups of children with varying vocabulary size at 18 months. The stability of vocabulary development at 18 and 24 months was investigated in a larger study, with focus on children’s vocabulary composition and grammatical abilities. The third study examined interrelations among early gestures, receptive and productive vocabulary, and grammar measured with M3L, i.e. three longest utterances, from 12 to 30 months.

    Overall results of the thesis highlight the importance of early language development. Variability in different characteristics in parental input is associated with variability in child vocabulary size. Children with large early vocabularies exhibit the most stability in vocabulary composition and the earliest grammatical development. Children’s vocabulary composition may reflect individual stylistic variation. Use of early gestures is associated differentially with receptive and productive vocabulary.

    Results of the thesis have implications for parents, child- and healthcare personnel, as well as researchers and educational practitioners. The results underscore the importance of high quality in adult-child interaction, with rich input fine-tuned to children’s developmental levels and age, together with high awareness of early language development.

  • 6.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Early Communicative Gestures and Vocabulary Knowledge2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This poster presents work on the relationships between early communicative gestures and vocabulary knowledge in Swedish children aged 12 to 18 months. The role of gestures in early communicative development was studied using vocabulary measurements collected with the Swedish versions of the MacArthur-Bates CDI infant and toddler forms. In a larger study, correlations were calculated among communicative skills over 6-month intervals from child age 1;0 to 2;6 in a sample with varying numbers of children at different ages. The poster presents results from the first pairwise comparison using cross-sectional and cross-lagged correlations. Variables included gestures, receptive and productive vocabulary at 1;0, and productive vocabulary and the syntactic/grammatical measure M3L at 1;6 (n = 321). Gestures at 1;0 were more strongly correlated with receptive than productive vocabulary at the same age, and weakly correlated with productive vocabulary at 1;6. Additional analysis divided the gesture scale into “empty-hand” gestures and “object actions”, following Sansavini et al. (2010). Empty-hand gestures were found to be more related to productive vocabulary, while object-actions were more related to reception. Despite differences in methodology, results of the present study confirm some findings by Sansavini et al. Further analysis of the Swedish data showed that empty-hand gestures were significantly, but weakly, correlated with the percentage of nouns in children’s vocabularies at 1;6, whereas children’s use of object-actions were similarly correlated with the percentage of verbs. Results of this analysis may indicate that empty-hand gestures, which most often are deictic gestures, help infants enhance their knowledge of objects and their names, while activities with objects help them understand the concepts related to actions, particularly verbs. Such knowledge has implications for both parents and other caregivers who are invested in stimulating the language development of young children.

  • 7.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    I Feel Like a Complete Idiot! Starting a PhD Program in a New Field2017In: The Nordic PhD: Surviving and Succeeding / [ed] Christopher McMaster, Caterina Murphy and Jakob Rosenkrantz de Lasson, Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2017Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Morphosyntactic Coding of Swedish: Developing a MOR Grammar for the CHAT transcription format2011In: National Forum for English Studies in Sweden, Umeå universitet, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Ordförråd och ordkunskap – språkets byggstenar2016In: Läsundervisningens grunder / [ed] Tarja Alatalo, Malmö: Gleerups Utbildning AB, 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Ordförråd och ordkunskap: Språkets byggstenar2015Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Kunskap om ord och deras betydelser är inte bara en förutsättning för en god läsutveckling utan också för hur barn ska klara sig i livet. Studier har visat att olikheter i den tidiga språkutvecklingsmiljön kan leda till slående skillnader i barns ordförråd redan i förskoleåldern. Dessa olikheter bereder stora utmaningar för dagens lärare och andra som arbetar med barn. Kännedom om hur ordinlärning stimuleras i hemmet och i förskolan kan bidra till att utjämna dessa skillnader.

  • 11.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Parental Linguistic Input and Children’s Vocabulary Development: Poster presentation2011In: 12th International Conference for the Study of Child Language, Social, genetic and cognitive determinants in the acquisition and development of language, Montreal, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The quantity and quality of parental linguistic input is essential to children’s vocabulary development. The current analysis is part of the SPRINT project, which uses a naturalistic family intervention to investigate the relationship between parent interaction style and vocabulary development in Swedish children 18 to 36 months old. Initial measurements of the children’s vocabulary at 12 months are followed by non-concurrent onset of intervention at either 18, 24 or 30 months. During each three-month intervention period, parents are given access to video material highlighting “best practice” adult-child interaction sessions and commentary on child language development. Parents also supply vocabulary measurements using the Swedish version of the CDI and audio recordings of interaction with their children before, during and after accessing the video material. Ten children from the first intervention cohort were chosen for this analysis. Five of these children scored in the lowest quartile on the vocabulary inventory reported at 18 months of age and five children had scores in the 50-65th percentile range. From the recordings of parent-child interaction, transcriptions of child-directed utterances were made for a total of 40 minutes per child. The transcriptions were quantitatively analyzed for MLU, lexical diversity, syntactic complexity and use of feedback morphemes. A comparison of the data for parents of children with low versus average vocabulary scores indicates qualitative differences in interaction styles. The vocabulary development of the two groups of children also reveals clearly different trajectories. The data suggest an interrelationship between parent interaction style and children’s vocabulary development.

  • 12.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Parent-child interaction in three groups with varying child vocabulary size2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Språkinterventionsprojektet SPRINT: Effekter av ett familjestödsprogram för att utveckla barns ordförråd och senare läs- och skrivförmåga2009In: Kompetensnätverk för barn- och ungdomsforskning, Falun, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English. Stockholm University, Department of Special Education.
    Vocabulary Composition in Swedish Children aged 18-24 months2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Berglund, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    En analys av föräldrars samtalsstil och barns ordförrådsutveckling2011In: Specialpedagogikens dag, Stockholms universitet, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Berglund, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för lingvistik.
    Parental Feedback and Vocabulary Development in Low and Average Performing Children: Poster presentation2011In: ADYLOC International Conference, Variation in first and second language acquisition: comparative perspectives, Paris, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Berglund, Eva
    Stockholms universitet, Barn- och ungdomsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Sundberg, Ulla
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för lingvistik.
    Parental Language Input and Children's Vocabulary Development: A comparison of verbal input by Swedish mothers and fathers to children with low, average and large vocabularies at 18 months of age2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Early vocabulary development in children lays the foundation for general language acquisition, including articulation, grammar and literacy. A great deal of recent research has shown the importance of early linguistic and communicative stimulation for word learning. The first phase of the SPRINT project at Stockholm University (“Effects of enhanced parental input on young children’s vocabulary development and subsequent literacy development”) aims to investigate the impact of a naturalistic family intervention on vocabulary development in Swedish children 18 to 36 months old. The general aim of the larger longitudinal study is to deliver a predictive model of environmental factors, including an education program for parents (the intervention), with emphasis on lexical development and subsequent literacy attainment, spanning the language development of children from 12 months through the first three years of school. The SPRINT project recognizes the importance of cultural context on language acquisition and is therefore part of an international network with representatives from seven countries aiming to share experiences and collaborate on comparative analyses of nation-specific data regarding children’s vocabulary development and reading acquisition. This will enable us to make international comparisons with the results of American studies such as Hart & Risley’s (1995) seminal work.Current analyses of data from the SPRINT project include an investigation of parental interaction style in relation to children’s vocabulary development. In this first study, a comparison is made of parental linguistic input directed to two sets of children chosen from the first intervention cohort. The two groups consist of children with low (0-25th percentile) and medium verbal ability (50-65th percentile) according to the Swedish version of the MacArthur CDI at age 1;6. Results, based on the analysis of audio recordings of parent-child interaction in four different everyday situations, indicate significant differences between the two groups of parents regarding the amount and diversity of input. In addition, the two groups of parents use positive interactive behaviors, such as affirming, imitating and commenting on their child’s communicative intent, to significantly different extents. The current analysis will be extended to include parental input by parents of children with high verbal ability at 18 months of age, the beginning of the three-month intervention period for the first of three intervention cohorts. The second and third cohorts started the intervention phase of the project when the children were 24 and 30 months of age, respectively. In addition, a statistical analysis of the vocabulary development of the children in the three intervention groups and a control group will be undertaken. A further extension of the project will be the development of a MOR grammar for Swedish, which will enable automatic morphosyntactic coding of material in the CHAT transcription format of the CHILDES database and thus facilitate computerized analysis of parent-child interaction. Current and future results of the longitudinal SPRINT project represent a unique opportunity for further research on children’s literacy development, from both a Swedish and an international perspective.

  • 18.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Myrberg, Mats
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Dahlin, Karin
    Stockholms universitet, Specialpedagogiska institutionen.
    Interventionsprojektet SPRINT2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    von Rosen, Tatjana
    Stockholms universitet.
    Early Communicative Development in Swedish Children aged 12 to 30 months2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on child language acquisition confirms the importance of early language development for later language and literacy skills (Dickinson, Golinkoff & Hirsh-Pasek, 2010; Lee, 2011), and documents great individual variability in children’s acquisition rates (Fenson et al., 1994). Recent research has also widened the focus to include the impact of early gestures (e.g. Rowe & Goldin-Meadow, 2009). This study aims to investigate early communicative development in a sample of Swedish children based on parental report, using Swedish versions of the MacArthur-Bates CDI (Berglund & Eriksson, 2000; Eriksson & Berglund, 1999). In particular, variables such as early communicative gestures, receptive and productive vocabulary, and the syntactic/grammatical measure M3L (the Mean Length of Utterance score of the three longest utterances parents have heard their child say) are explored. The specific target group here is a subsample (from a total sample of 348) consisting of 128 children with complete records collected at six-month intervals (12, 18, 24 and 30 months of age). In the analysis, gender and children’s ability to use the pointing gesture at 12 months are used as grouping variables.

    The analysis entails first looking at general trends in the data, and thereafter examining individual trajectories, especially extreme ones. Growth curve modelling is employed to describe trajectories of productive vocabulary development, first with gender as the grouping variable, and secondly, with the pointing gesture at 12 months of age. Since preliminary results show different variation in the response between boys and girls, different covariance structures are used for modelling. Moreover, banded covariance structure is utilized to take into account strong correlations between neighboring time points (12-18, 18-24, and 24-30 months). Testing fixed effects reveals highly significantly different slopes for girls and boys. The banded covariance structure is also used in the analysis of productive vocabulary with pointing as the grouping variable. Taking into account heterogeneity in the two groups, results also indicate highly significant differences in vocabulary growth for pointers vs. non-pointers. However, separate analysis of the two groups is needed before further conclusions can be made. It must also be stressed that the data comes from parental report, and observational knowledge of both parental and child gestures is lacking. However, the results of this study definitely contribute to the international body of knowledge with data from the Swedish context. Furthermore, results regarding early communication are of interest for parents, child- and healthcare personnel, as well as educational practitioners.

  • 20.
    Cox Eriksson, Christine
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    von Rosen, Tatjana
    Stockholm University.
    Vocabulary, Grammar and Early Gestures in Swedish Children aged 12-30 months2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on child language acquisition confirms the importance of early language development for later language and literacy skills, and documents great individual variability in children’s acquisition rates. This study aims to investigate early communicative development in a sample of Swedish children based on parental report, using Swedish versions of the MacArthur-Bates CDI. In particular, variables such as early communicative gestures, receptive and productive vocabulary, and grammatical development are explored. The study is a reanalysis of previously collected data (Cox Eriksson, 2014), using a subsample of 128 children with complete records for measures collected at six-month intervals (12, 18, 24 and 30 months of age). The analysis examines both general trends through growth curve modelling in addition to some individual trajectories. Results indicate gender differences in vocabulary profiles, and although there is no main effect of gender, girls exhibit a significantly higher rate of growth. Individual vocabulary trajectories for boys exhibit more variation than those of girls. There is also a significant effect on vocabulary size for use of the pointing gesture at 12 months. Regarding grammatical development, trajectories for girls and boys exhibit differences in variation as well as individual outliers.

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