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  • 1.
    Fahlström, Magnus
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Microdata Analysis.
    Teledahl, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    Students’ use of images for documenting their problem solving2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Olsson, Jan
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för utbildning, kultur och kommunikation.
    Teledahl, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education. Örebro universitet.
    Feedback to encourage creative reasoning2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Teledahl, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education. Örebro universitet.
    Different modes in teachers' discussions of students' mathematical texts2015In: Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, ISSN 0742-051X, E-ISSN 1879-2480, Vol. 51, p. 68-76Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims to examine elementary school mathematics teachers' ways of discussing students' mathematical texts. Nineteen teachers were interviewed in groups and asked to discuss 15 texts. The object of study is the teachers' collective discussions, analyzed using a discourse analytic approach. Findings indicate that two different modes are visible in the discussions: a pedagogical mode, connected to the teachers' position as pedagogues and where identification of students' strategies is foregrounded, and an assessment mode, connected to the teachers' position as examiners, in which a deficiency perspective is adopted that views particular features as 'missing' from the texts.

  • 4.
    Teledahl, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    How young students communicate their mathematical problem solving in writing2017In: International journal of mathematical education in science and technology, ISSN 0020-739X, E-ISSN 1464-5211, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 555-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates young students’ writing in connection to mathematical problem solving. Students’ written communication has traditionally been used by mathematics teachers in the assessment of students’ mathematical knowledge. This study rests on the notion that this writing represents a particular activity which requires a complex set of resources. In order to help students develop their writing, teachers need to have a thorough knowledge of mathematical writing and its distinctive features. The study aims to add to the body of knowledge about writing in school mathematics by investigating young students’ mathematical writing from a communicational, rather than mathematical, perspective. A basic inventory of the communicational choices, that are identifiable across a sample of 519 mathematical texts, produced by 9–12 year old students, is created. The texts have been analysed with multimodal discourse analysis, and the findings suggest diversity in students’ use of images, words, numerals, symbols and layout to organize their texts and to represent their problem-solving process along with an answer to the problem. The inventory and the indication that students have different ideas on how, what, for whom and why they should be writing, can be used by teachers to initiate discussions of what may constitute good communication. 

  • 5.
    Teledahl, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education. Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Knowledge and writing in school mathematics: a communicational approach2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This thesis is about young students’ writing in school mathematics and the ways in which this writing is designed, interpreted and understood. Students’ communication can act as a source from which teachers can make inferences regarding students’ mathematical knowledge and understanding. In mathematics education previous research indicates that teachers assume that the process of interpreting and judging students’ writing is unproblematic. The relationship between what students’ write, and what they know or understand, is theoretical as well as empirical. In an era of increased focus on assessment and measurement in education it is necessary for teachers to know more about the relationship between communication and achievement. To add to this knowledge, the thesis has adopted a broad approach, and the thesis consists of four studies. The aim of these studies is to reach a deep understanding of writing in school mathematics. Such an understanding is dependent on examining different aspects of writing. The four studies together examine how the concept of communication is described in authoritative texts, how students’ writing is viewed by teachers and how students make use of different communicational resources in their writing. The results of the four studies indicate that students’ writing is more complex than is acknowledged by teachers and authoritative texts in mathematics education. Results point to a sophistication in students’ approach to the merging of the two functions of writing, writing for oneself and writing for others. Results also suggest that students attend, to various extents, to questions regarding how, what and for whom they are writing in school mathematics. The relationship between writing and achievement is dependent on students’ ability to have their writing reflect their knowledge and on teachers’ thorough knowledge of the different features of writing and their awareness of its complexity. From a communicational perspective the ability to communicate [in writing] in mathematics can and should be distinguished from other mathematical abilities. By acknowledging that mathematical communication integrates mathematical language and natural language, teachers have an opportunity to turn writing in mathematics into an object of learning. This offers teachers the potential to add to their assessment literacy and offers students the potential to develop their communicational ability in order to write in a way that better reflects their mathematical knowledge.

  • 6.
    Teledahl, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    Mathematics teachers’ assessment of accounts of problem solving2017In: Proceedings of the Tenth Congress of the European Society for Research in Mathematics Education (CERME10, February 1-5, 2017) / [ed] Dooley, T., & Gueudet, G., Dublin, 2017, p. 3596-3603Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Teledahl, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    Sumpter, Lovisa
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    What is noticed in students' mathematical texts?2015In: Current State of Research on Mathematical Beliefs XX: Proceedings of the MAVI-20 Conference September 29 - October 1, 2014, Falun, Sweden / [ed] Lovisa Sumpter, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Teledahl, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    Taflin, Eva
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    Identifying what in Students’ Mathematical Texts?2014In: Proceedings of the Joint Meeting of PME 38 and PME-NA / [ed] Liljedahl, P., Nicol, C., Oesterle, S., & Allan, D, Vancouver: PME , 2014, p. 242-242Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Teledahl, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    Taflin, Eva
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    Bjerneby Häll, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Mathematics Education.
    Assessment in distance courses in mathematics and mathematics education2012In: Proceedings of NORMA 11: the sixth Nordic conference on mathematics education in Reykjavik, May 11-14 2011. / [ed] Gunnarsdottir, G. H., 2012, p. -50Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to increase general understanding of the factors influencing teachers’ choices of assessment tasks in distance courses in university mathematics and mathematics education. Six interviews were conducted in which teachers elaborated on their reasoning concerning choices of assessment tasks. The results show that the forms of assessment tasks used in distance education, along with the reasoning preceding the choice of these tasks, differ little from those used in campus based education. One possible explanation for this can be that nearly all assessment tasks described in the interviews were conducted in face-to-face situations. The technical aspects of modern distance education seem to have a minor influence on the choice of form ofassessment.

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