du.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Religious Studies.
    Anthropomorphism and mechanomorphism2012In: Humanimalia - a journal of human/animal interface studies, ISSN 2151-8645, E-ISSN 2151-8645, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 107-122Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Religious Studies.
    Critical anthropomorphism and animal ethics2012In: Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics, ISSN 1187-7863, E-ISSN 1573-322X, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 707-720Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anthropomorphism has long been considered a cardinal error when describing animals. Ethicists have feared the consequences of misrepresenting animals in their reasoning. Recent research within human-animal studies, however, has sophisticated the notion of anthropomorphism. It is suggested that avoiding anthropomorphism merely creates other morphisms, such as mechanomorphism. Instead of avoiding anthropomorphism, it is argued that it is a communicative strategy that should be used critically. Instances of anthropomorphism in animal ethics are analyzed in this paper. Some analogies made between people and non-human animals in present theories of animal ethics are clear instances of psychological anthropomorphism. Other analogies are implicit cases of cultural anthropomorphism. It is argued that animal ethics needs to take the wider discourse of critical anthropomorphism into account in order to sophisticate the understanding and use of anthropomorphic projections. Anthropomorphism is an efficient tool of communication, and it may be made an adequate one as well.

  • 3.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Religious Studies.
    Mobility, animals, and the virtue of justice2019In: Mobilities, mobility justice and social justice / [ed] Nancy Cook & David Butz, New York: Routledge, 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Religious Studies.
    Szatek, Elsa
    Stockholms universitet.
    Helandet i sårbarheten2017In: DRAMA: Nordisk dramapedagogisk tidsskrift, ISSN 0332-5296, no 1, p. 6p. 12-17Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5. McLaughlin, David
    et al.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    a Division of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Edinburgh, Hugh Robson Building, George Square, Edinburgh.
    Tian, Natasha
    Pratt, Thomas
    Bullock, Simon L.
    Wilson, Valerie A.
    Price, David J.
    Mason, John O.
    Specific modification of heparan sulphate is required for normal cerebral cortical development2003In: Mechanisms of Development, ISSN 0925-4773, E-ISSN 1872-6356, Vol. 120, no 12, p. 1481-1488Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteoglycans are cell surface and extracellular matrix molecules to which long, unbranched glycosaminoglycan side chains are attached. Heparan sulphate, a type of glycosaminoglycan chain, has been proposed as a co-factor necessary for signalling by a range of growth factors. Here we provide evidence that loss of 2-O-sulphation in heparan sulphate leads to a significant reduction in cell proliferation in the developing cerebral cortex. The gene encoding heparan sulphate 2-sulphotransferase (Hs2st) is expressed in embryonic cortex and histological analysis of mice homozygous for a null mutation in Hs2st indicated a reduction in the thickness of the embryonic cerebral cortex. Using 5′-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assays we found a reduction of approximately 40% in labelling indices of cortical precursor cells at E12. Comparison of the fates of cortical cells born on E13 and E15 in Hs2st−/− mutant and wildtype littermate embryos revealed no differences in the pattern of cell migration. Our findings suggest a critical role for 2-O-sulphation of heparan sulphate proteoglycan (HSPG) in regulating cell proliferation during development of the cerebral cortex, perhaps through the modulation of cellular responses to growth factor signalling.

1 - 5 of 5
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf