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  • 1. Bozkurt Ahman, H
    et al.
    Giedraitis, V
    Cedervall, Y
    Berglund, L
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Rosendahl, E
    Ingelsson, M
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Correlations Between Dual-Task Performance and Alzheimer’s Disease Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Cederholm, Tommy
    et al.
    Kirn, Dylan R.
    Koochek, Afsaneh
    Reid, Kieran F.
    von Berens, Åsa
    Travison, Thomas G.
    Folta, Sara
    Sacheck, Jennifer
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Fielding, Roger A.
    Effect of nutritional supplementation and structured physical activity on physical function in mobility-limited older adults: results from the VIVE2 study2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3. Cedervall, Y
    et al.
    Giedraitis, V
    Berglund, L
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kilander, L
    Rosendahl, E
    Ingelsson, M
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Timed Up-and-Go dual-task performance – a marker for dementia?2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Cedervall, Ylva
    et al.
    Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Geriatrik, Uppsala universitet.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control, Uppsala University.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    A longitudinal study of gait function and characteristics of gait disturbances in individuals with Alzheimer's disease2014In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 1022-1027Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Walking in daily life places high demands on the interplay between cognitive and motor functions. A well-functioning dual-tasking ability is thus essential for walking safely. The aims were to study longitudinal changes in gait function during single- and dual-tasking over a period of two years among people with initially mild AD (n = 21). Data were collected on three occasions, twelve months apart. An optical motion capture system was used for three-dimensional gait analysis. Gait parameters were examined at comfortable gait speed during single-tasking, dual-tasking naming names, and naming animals. The dual-task cost for gait speed was pronounced at baseline (names 26%, animals 35%), and remained so during the study period. A significant (p < 0.05) longitudinal decline in gait speed and step length during single- and dual-tasking was observed, whereas double support time, step width and step height showed inconsistent results. Systematic visual examination of the motion capture files revealed that dual-tasking frequently resulted in gait disturbances. Three main characteristics of such disturbances were identified: Temporal disturbance, Spatial disturbance and Instability in single stance. These aberrant gait performances may affect gait stability and increase the risk of falling. Furthermore, the observed gait disturbances can contribute to understanding and explaining previous reported gait variability among individuals with AD. However, the role that dual-task testing and aberrant dual-task gait performance play in the identification of individuals with early signs of cognitive impairment and in predicting fall risk in AD remains to be studied.

  • 5.
    Cedervall, Ylva
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University .
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Department of Information Technology, Uppsala University .
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University .
    Longitudinal study of gait function in people with Alzheimer disease2013In: CONGRESS PROGRAMME: 22ND Annual Meeting of ESMAC 5-7 September 2013, Glasgow, Scotland, 2013, p. 243-243Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Cedervall, Ylva
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Kilander, Lena
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Declining physical capacity but maintained aerobic activity in early Alzheimer's disease2012In: American Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementia, ISSN 1533-3175, E-ISSN 1938-2731, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 180-187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The longitudinal influences on physical capacity and habitual aerobic activity level in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are unclear. Therefore, changes in physical capacity and aerobic activity level were evaluated. Twenty-five individuals with AD were assessed annually for 2 years, by 10-m walk test, 6-minute walk test, and timed up-and-go (TUG) single/dual tasks. Habitual aerobic activity was assessed by diary registrations. The AD group showed a lower physical capacity than controls at baseline but comparable levels of aerobic activity. During the follow-up period, physical capacity declined in the AD group, but the aerobic activity levels changed only marginally. Our results show that in the early stages of AD, people are capable of maintaining health-promoting aerobic activity levels, despite a decline in their physical capacity. Additionally, it appears that cognitive dysfunction contributes to an impaired physical capacity. The TUG tasks might, therefore, be useful for detecting early signs of cognitive impairment.

  • 7.
    Cedervall, Ylva 
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Kilander, Lena
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Declining physical capacity, but maintained health promoting aerobic activity in early Alzheimer's disease2012In: ISPGR / GAIT & MENTAL FUNCTION 1st JointWorld Congress: Symposia, Oral and Posters Sessions : Authors, Titles, Affiliations & Abstracts, 2012, p. 460-461Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Cedervall, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Maintaining well-being and selfhood through physical activity: experiences of people with mild Alzheimer's disease2015In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 19, no 8, p. 679-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To contribute to furthering the understanding of how people with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) reason about physical activity as part of everyday life, with a specific focus on the meanings attached to such activity. 

    Method: In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 individuals with mild AD. Qualitative content analysis was used to interpret the data. 

    Results: The analysis revealed three sub-themes reflecting interrelated perspectives on how people with mild AD reason about physical activity: (1) striving to be physically active, mirrors the concrete approaches used for handling the consequences of having AD in relation to being active; (2) perceptions of physical activity, reflect how their thoughts and beliefs regarding written and tacit norms encouraged them to remain physically active, and (3) physical activity as a means to well-being, alludes to feelings and emotions related to the performance of physical activity. Interpretation of the underlying patterns in these sub-themes revealed one overarching theme: Physical activity as a means to selfhood maintenance, which suggests that physical activity can help to shift the focus from the dementia diagnosis (i.e. ill health) to a more healthy and able self. 

    Conclusion: The findings suggest that physical activity, apart from maintaining body functions, can be a way to sustain well-being and selfhood in mild AD. This aspect of physical activity is important to consider in research, policy and practice when addressing the needs of people with dementia.

  • 9.
    Cedervall, Ylva
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Decline in physical performance during a period of one year at erarly stage of Alzehemier´s desease2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Cedervall, Ylva
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik.
    ”If I don’t exercise; I don’t feel good. That’s it.”: Physical activity among people with Alzheimer’s disease2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Cedervall, Ylva
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik.
    Physical activity and implications on well-being in mild Alzheimer's disease: A qualitative case study on two men with dementia and their spouses2010In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 226-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To improve the understanding of experiences of people with mild Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their significant others, related to the physical activity of the afflicted persons and its perceived importance. A qualitative case study design was used. The study comprised two men with mild AD and their wives. Data were collected by qualitative interviews and participant observations. Data analysis followed a thematic guideline as described by Braun and Clarke ( 2006 ). Three central themes of experiences related to physical activity in AD were identified: 1) physical activity as health reinforcement; 2) barriers to physical activity; and 3) adaptation strategies. Important motivations for outdoor walks were enjoyable experiences of nature, body movement, and positive attitudes toward physical activity. Several factors were experienced as barriers to physical activity (e.g., tiredness, difficulties in finding one's way, and "peculiar behavior"). Significant others made considerable adjustments in everyday life to enable their partners to retain a physically active lifestyle. The findings indicate that in persons with AD, physical activities such as outdoor walking can play an important part in everyday life by creating meaningful routines and improving experienced well-being and health.

  • 12.
    Elmgren Frykberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Rehabiliteringsmedicin.
    Thierfelder, Tomas
    Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control, Uppsala University.
    Borg, Jörgen
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Danderyd University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hirschfeld, Helga
    Motor Control and Physical Therapy Research Laboratory, Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Impact of stroke on anterior–posterior force generation prior to seat-off during sit-to-walk2012In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 56-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Elmgren Frykberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, Rehabilitation Medicine, Uppsala University.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control, Uppsala University; School of Technology and Health, the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borg, Jörgen
    Department of Neuroscience/Rehabilitation Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Hirschfeld, Helga
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Temporal coordination of the sit-to-walk task in subjects with stroke and in controls2009In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0003-9993, E-ISSN 1532-821X, Vol. 90, no 6, p. 1009-1017Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To explore events and describe phases for temporal coordination of the sit-to-walk (STW) task, within a semistandardized set up, in subjects with stroke and matched controls. In addition, to assess variability of STW phase duration and to compare the relative duration of STW phases between the 2 groups.

    Design: Cross-sectional.

    Setting: Research laboratory.

    Participants: A convenience sample of persons with hemiparesis (n=10; age 50–67y), more than 6 months after stroke and 10 controls matched for sex, age, height, and body mass index.

    Interventions: Not applicable.

    Main Outcome Measures: Relative duration of STW phases, SE of measurement in percentage of the mean, and intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs).

    Results: Four STW phases were defined: rise preparation, transition, primary gait initiation, and secondary gait initiation. The subjects with stroke needed 54% more time to complete the STW task than the controls did. ICCs ranged from .38 to .66 and .22 to .57 in the stroke and control groups, respectively. SEs of measurement in percentage of the mean values were high, particularly in the transition phase: 54.1% (stroke) and 50.4% (controls). The generalized linear model demonstrated that the relative duration of the transition phase was significantly longer in the stroke group.

    Conclusions: The present results extend existing knowledge by presenting 4 new phases of temporal coordination of STW, within a semistandardized set-up, in persons with stroke and in controls. The high degree of variability regarding relative STW phase duration was probably a result of both the semistandardized set up and biological variability. The significant difference in the transition phase across the 2 groups requires further study.

  • 14. Fielding, Roger A.
    et al.
    Kirn, Dylan R.
    Koochek, Afsaneh
    Reid, Kieran F.
    von Berens, Åsa
    Travison, Thomas G.
    Folta, Sara
    Sacheck, Jennifer
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Cederholm, Tommy
    Effect of nutritional supplementation and structured physical activity on physical function in mobility-limited older adults: results from the VIVE2 study2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 15. Fielding, Roger A.
    et al.
    Travison, T. G.
    Kirn, D. R.
    Koochek, A.
    Reid, K. F.
    von Berens, Å.
    Zhu, H.
    Folta, S. C.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Cederholm, T.
    Effect of structured physical activity and nutritional supplementation on physical function in mobility-limited older adults: Results from the VIVE2 randomized trial2017In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 936-942Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    The interactions between nutritional supplementation and physical activity on changes in physical function among older adults remain unclear. The primary objective of this study was to examine the impact of nutritional supplementation plus structured physical activity on 400M walk capacity in mobility-limited older adults across two sites (Boston, USA and Stockholm, Sweden).

    Design

    All subjects participated in a physical activity program (3x/week for 24 weeks), involving walking, strength, balance, and flexibility exercises. Subjects were randomized to a daily nutritional supplement (150kcal, 20g whey protein, 800 IU vitamin D) or placebo (30kcal, non-nutritive).

    Setting

    Participants were recruited from urban communities at 2 field centers in Boston MA USA and Stockholm SWE.

    Participants

    Mobility-limited (Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB) ≤9) and vitamin D insufficient (serum 25(OH) D 9 - 24 ng/ml) older adults were recruited for this study.

    Measurements

    Primary outcome was gait speed assessed by the 400M walk. Results: 149 subjects were randomized into the study (mean age=77.5±5.4; female=46.3%; mean SPPB= 7.9±1.2; mean 25(OH)D=18.7±6.4 ng/ml). Adherence across supplement and placebo groups was similar (86% and 88%, respectively), and was also similar across groups for the physical activity intervention (75% and 72%, respectively). Both groups demonstrated an improvement in gait speed with no significant difference between those who received the nutritional supplement compared to the placebo (0.071 and 0.108 m/s, respectively (p=0.06)). Similar effects in physical function were observed using the SPPB. Serum 25(OH)D increased in supplemented group compared to placebo 7.4 ng/ml versus 1.3 ng/ml respectively.

    Conclusion

    Results suggest improved gait speed following physical activity program with no further improvement with added nutritional supplementation.

  • 16.
    From, Ingrid
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Reflective Participation and Co-Learning to Achieve a Partnership with Potential Users of Fall-Prevention Exergames in the e-Balance Project2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Frykberg, Gunilla 
    et al.
    Umeå University ; Uppsala University.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control, Uppsala University.
    Thierfelder, Tomas
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences .
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Coordination of whole-body horizontal and vertical momenta during sit-to-walk after stroke2012In: ISPGR / GAIT & MENTAL FUNCTION 1st JointWorld Congress: Symposia, Oral and Posters SessionsAuthors, Titles, Affiliations & Abstracts, 2012, p. 384-385Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Frykberg, Gunilla
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Thierfelder, T.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Halvorsen, K.
    Department of Information Technology, Division of Systems and Control, Uppsala universty.
    Borg, J.
    Hirschfeld, H.
    Impact of stroke on anterior-posterior force generation prior to seat-off during sit-to-walk2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19. Kirn, D.R.
    et al.
    Koochek, A.
    Reid, K.F.
    von Berens, Å.
    Travison, T.G.
    Folta, S.
    Sacheck, J.
    Nelson, M.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Fielding, R.A.
    The vitality, independence, and vigor in the elderly 2 study (VIVE2): design and methods2015In: Contemporary Clinical Trials, ISSN 1551-7144, E-ISSN 1559-2030, Vol. 43, p. 164-171Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nutritional supplementation may potentiate the increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis following exercise in healthy older individuals. Whether exercise and nutrition act synergistically to produce sustained changes in physical functioning and body composition has not been well studied, particularly in mobility-limited older adults.

    Methods: The VIVE2 study was a multi-center, randomized controlled trial, conducted in the United States and Sweden. This study was designed to compare the effects of a 6-month intervention with a once daily, experimental, 4fl. oz. liquid nutritional supplement providing 150kcal, whey protein (20g), vitamin D (800IU) (Nestlé Health Science, Vevey, Switzerland), to a low calorie placebo drink (30kcal, non-nutritive; identical format) when combined with group-based exercise in 150 community-dwelling, mobility-limited older adults. All participants participated in a structured exercise program (3 sessions/week for 6months), which included aerobic, strength, flexibility, and balance exercises.

    Results: The primary outcome was 6-month change in 400m walk performance (m/s) between supplement and placebo groups. Secondary outcomes included 6month change in: body composition, muscle cross-sectional area, leg strength, grip strength, stair climb time, quality of life, physical performance, mood/depressive symptoms and nutritional status. These outcomes were selected based on their applicability to the health and well-being of older adults.

    Conclusions: The results of this study will further define the role of nutritional supplementation on physical functioning and restoration of skeletal muscle mass in older adults. Additionally, these results will help refine the current physical activity and nutritional recommendations for mobility-limited older adults.

  • 20. Koochek, A
    et al.
    von Berens, Å
    Gustafsson, T
    Kirn, D.R
    Laussen, J
    Reid, K.F
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Nydahl, M
    Cederholm, T
    Fielding, A
    Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D and physical performance in community-dwelling old mobility limited adults in Sweden and USA2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 21.
    Kullberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Döbelnsgatan, Uppsala.
    Björklund, Anita
    Department of Rehabilitation, School of Health Sciences.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Döbelnsgatan, Uppsala.
    'I start my day by thinking about what we're going to have for dinner': a qualitative study on approaches to food-related activities among elderly men with somatic diseases2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 227-234Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to address the question of how older men with somatic diseases living in their own home approach the question of food-related activities (FRA). Further, any adaptations of these activities necessitated by effects of diseases and of altered life circumstances were explored. Interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of 18 co-living and single-living men, 64-84 years old. They were diagnosed with Parkinson's disease, rheumatoid arthritis or stroke. In the analysis, a thematic framework was used. The findings revealed three food-related approaches, namely 'Cooking as a pleasure', describing joy in cooking; 'Cooking as a need', indicating no habits or skills in cooking; and 'Food is served', that is, being served meals by a partner. It was found that gender-related roles in particular, but also changed life circumstances, activity limitations, personal interests, and a wish to maintain continuity and independence, affected the men's approaches to these activities. This knowledge may be useful in attempts to facilitate and support FRA among elderly men with diseases. Health care efforts to promote FRA should preferably be individualised in respect to older men's approaches to these activities.

  • 22.
    Kullberg, Kerstin
    et al.
    Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet. Medicinska fakulteten. Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik.
    Food in older men with somatic diseases: eating habits and approaches to food related activities2009In: The aging male: Dec 2009, Vol. 12, No. 4: 122–156: Abstracts from 2nd European Congress on the Aging Male, September 3–5, 2009 in Budapest, Hungary, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23. Leavy, B.
    et al.
    Michaelsson, K.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik.
    Investigating the circumstances surrounding falls which lead to hip fracture2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24. Leavy, Breiffni
    et al.
    Byberg, Lisa
    Michaelsson, Karl
    Melhus, Håkan
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    The fall descriptions and health characteristics of older adults with hip fracture: a mixed methods study2015In: BMC Geriatrics, ISSN 1471-2318, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 15, article id 40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In light of the multifactorial etiology of fall-related hip fracture, knowledge of fall circumstances may be especially valuable when placed in the context of the health of the person who falls. We aimed to investigate the circumstances surrounding fall-related hip fractures and to describe fall circumstances in relation to participants' health and functional characteristics.

    Methods: The fall circumstances of 125 individuals (age >= 50 years) with hip fracture were investigated using semi-structured interviews. Data concerning participants' health (comorbidities and medications) and function (self-reported performance of mobility, balance, personal activities of daily living and physical activity, previous falls and hand grip strength) were collected via medical records, questionnaires and dynamometry. Using a mixed methods design, both data sets were analysed separately and then merged in order to provide a comprehensive description of fall events and identify eventual patterns in the data.

    Results: Fall circumstances were described as i) Activity at the time of the fall: Positional change (n = 24, 19%); Standing (n = 16, 13%); Walking (n = 71, 57%); Balance challenging (n = 14, 11%) and ii) Nature of the fall: Environmental (n = 32, 26%); Physiological (n = 35, 28%); Activity-related indoor (n = 8, 6%) and outdoor (n = 8, 6%); Trips and slips on snow (n = 20, 16%) and in snow-free conditions (n = 12, 10%) and Unknown (n = 10, 8%). We observed the following patterns regarding fall circumstances and participants' health: those who fell i) during positional change had the poorest functional status; ii) due to environmental reasons (indoors) had moderate physical function, but high levels of comorbidity and fall risk increasing medications; iii) in snow-free environments (outdoors) appeared to have a poorer health and functional status than other outdoor groups.

    Conclusions: Our findings indicate that patterns exist in relation to the falls circumstances and health characteristics of people with hip fracture which build upon that previously reported. These patterns, when verified, can provide useful information as to the ways in which fall prevention strategies can be tailored to individuals of varying levels of health and function who are at risk for falls and hip fracture.

  • 25. Leavy, Breiffni
    et al.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Byberg, Liisa
    The impact of disease and drugs on hip fracture risk2017In: Calcified Tissue International, ISSN 0171-967X, E-ISSN 1432-0827, Vol. 100, no 1, p. 1-12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We report the risks of a comprehensive range of disease and drug categories on hip fracture occurrence using a strict population-based cohort design. Participants included the source population of a Swedish county, aged ≥50 years (n = 117,494) including all incident hip fractures during 1 year (n = 477). The outcome was hospitalization for hip fracture (ICD-10 codes S72.0-S72.2) during 1 year (2009-2010). Exposures included: prevalence of (1) inpatient diseases [International Classification of Diseases (ICD) codes A00-T98 in the National Patient Register 1987-2010] and (2) prescribed drugs dispensed in 2010 or the year prior to fracture. We present age- and sex-standardized risk ratios (RRs), risk differences (RDs) and population attributable risks (PARs) of disease and drug categories in relation to hip fracture risk. All disease categories were associated with increased risk of hip fracture. Largest risk ratios and differences were for mental and behavioral disorders, diseases of the blood and previous fracture (RRs between 2.44 and 3.00; RDs (per 1000 person-years) between 5.0 and 6.9). For specific drugs, strongest associations were seen for antiparkinson (RR 2.32 [95 % CI 1.48-1.65]; RD 5.2 [1.1-9.4]) and antidepressive drugs (RR 1.90 [1.55-2.32]; RD 3.1 [2.0-4.3]). Being prescribed ≥10 drugs during 1 year incurred an increased risk of hip fracture, whereas prescription of cardiovascular drugs or ≤5 drugs did not appear to increase risk. Diseases inferring the greatest PARs included: cardiovascular diseases PAR 22 % (95 % CI 14-29) and previous injuries (PAR 21 % [95 % CI 16-25]; for specific drugs, antidepressants posed the greatest risk (PAR 16 % [95 % CI 12.0-19.3]).

  • 26.
    Leavy, Breiffni
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Ortopedi.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik; Swedish Sch Sport & Hlth Sci, Stockholm, Sweden.
    "Not ready to throw in the towel": perceptions of physical activity held by older adults in Stockholm and Dublin2010In: Journal of Aging and Physical Activity, ISSN 1063-8652, E-ISSN 1543-267X, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 219-236Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this qualitative study was to explore and describe the perceptions of physical activity held by older urban Swedish and Irish adults. Qualitative interviews were carried out with 30 people age 65 years and older (mean age 74.5), of whom 15 were living in Dublin and 15 were living in Stockholm. The "thematic framework" approach was used to analyze the data. Three central themes were identified regarding people's perceptions of physical activity: physical activity as self-expression, physical activity as interaction, and physical activity as health promotion. Participants' perceptions of physical activity tended to relate to their perceived level of physical activity, regardless of their cultural background. Certain culture-specific motivators and barriers to exercise were also identified. Less active Irish men were more likely to underestimate the health-promoting benefits of exercise.

  • 27.
    Leavy, Breiffni
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Ortopedi.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik.
    Melhus, Håkan
    Uppsala universitet, Klinisk farmakogenomik och osteoporos.
    Mallmin, Hans
    Uppsala universitet, Ortopedi.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala universitet, Ortopedi.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala universitet, Ortopedi.
    When and where do hip fractures occur?: A population-based study2013In: Osteoporosis International, ISSN 0937-941X, E-ISSN 1433-2965, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 2387-2396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    SUMMARY

    We investigated the effects of socio-demographic and health factors on timing and location of hip fracture among 484 subjects. Time of fracture varied between community dwellers and residential care facility dwellers, and in relation to subjects' psychotropic drug status. Indoor hip fracture incidence increased on snow-covered days.

    INTRODUCTION

    This paper aims to describe the timing and whereabouts of hip fracture cases in a population-based setting and to relate these factors with residential and health status, seasonal variation, and snow-covered ground.

    METHODS

    We consecutively included 484 incident hip fracture events (age ≥50 years) admitted to a Swedish orthopedic department during a 1-year period. Data concerning socio-demographic details, fall location, time of fracture, comorbidity, and medications were collected from in-patient medical records and through patient or caregiver interviews.

    RESULTS

    The expected peak in fracture occurrence during daytime was observed among community dwellers but not among subjects living in residential care. Hip fracture was twice as likely to occur during nighttime hours among psychotropic drug users (adjusted odds ratio (Adj. OR), 2.20; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 1.12-4.30) compared to those not receiving these medications. Subjects without dementia, taking psychotropic drugs, were also more likely to fracture during nighttime hours (Adj. OR, 2.91; 95 % CI, 1.40-6.0). We observed an increase in indoor hip fracture incidence on snow-covered days among community dwellers (incidence rate ratio, 1.34; 95 % CI, 1.02-1.74). We observed only a weak seasonal trend in hip fracture incidence, based on month, among community dwellers who fractured indoors.

    CONCLUSIONS

    Special attention and possibly fall-preventive efforts should be directed not only toward those living in residential care facilities but also toward community-dwelling subjects taking psychotropic drugs since these groups have a higher incidence of nighttime hip fracture. Further research aiming to explain the seasonal variation of indoor fracture incidence among community dwellers is warranted.

  • 28. Sobestiansky, S
    et al.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Fugmann, A
    Cederholm, T
    Sarcopenia, anthropometry and malnutrition in relation to 2-y mortality in geriatric patients2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Tarassova, Olga 
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Elmgren Frykberg, Gunilla 
    Umeå University.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik.
    Dynamic and static margin of stability in sit-to-walk compared to sit-to-stand in older people with and without fear of falling2012In: ISPGR / GAIT & MENTAL FUNCTION 1st JointWorld Congress: Symposia, Oral and Posters SessionsAuthors, Titles, Affiliations & Abstracts, 2012, p. 258-259Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Tarassova, Olga
    et al.
    Swedish School of Sport and Sciences (GIH).
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik.
    Ekblom, Maria M 
    Swedish School of Sport and Sciences (GIH).
    Balance mechanisms in children with and without motor coordination difficulties2012In: ISPGR / GAIT & MENTAL FUNCTION: 1st Joint World CongressSymposia, Oral and Posters Sessions Authors, Titles, Affiliations & Abstracts, 2012, p. 260-261Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik.
    Bedömning, test och instrument2012In: Äldres hälsa: ett sjukgymnastiskt perspektiv / [ed] Rydwik, Elisabeth, Lund: Studentlitteratur , 2012, 1. uppl.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Geriatrik.
    Generell Motorisk Funktionsbedömning: GMF Manual2011Book (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Cedervall, Y
    Giedraitis, V
    Berglund, L
    Lennhed, B
    Rosendahl, E
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kilander, L
    Can Timed Up-and- GO (TUG) Dual Task Performance Aid Diagnosis of Dementia?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Cedervall, Y
    Giedraitis, V
    Berglund, L
    Lennhed, B
    Rosendahl, E
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kilander, L
    Can Timed Up-and-GO (TUG) Dual Task Performance Aid Diagnosis of Dementia?2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Cedervall, Y
    Lundberg, C
    Giedraitis, V
    Berglund, L
    Kilander, L
    Ingelsson, M
    Rosendahl, E
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Timed Up-and-Go dual-task performance in people with cognitive impairment2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 36.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala universitet.
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Örebro universitet.
    Inpatient geriatric care in Sweden: Important factors from an inter-disciplinary team perspective2017In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 172, p. 113-120Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe factors of importance for the quality of inpatient geriatric care from an inter-disciplinary team perspective, an area that has not been previously studied to our knowledge. The study design was qualitative descriptive with data being collected from focus-group interviews with members of geriatric care teams. The data collection was conducted at a Swedish university hospital with 69 beds for geriatric care. It comprised five group interviews with a total of 32 staff members, including representatives of all the seven professions working with geriatric care. Data was analysed using qualitative content analysis and a thematic framework approach. Three main themes were identified as being perceived as characterising important factors essential for quality geriatric care:

    • Interactive assessment processes,
    • A holistic care approach, and
    • Proactive non-hierarchical interaction

    Aspects of time and goal-orientation were additionally running like common threads through these themes and informed them. Accessibility, open communication, and staff continuity were experienced as prerequisites for well-functioning teamwork. Including patients and relatives in care planning and implementation was seen as essential for good care, but was at risk due to budget cuts that imposed shortened hospital stays. To meet the care demands of the growing population of older frail people, more specialised team-based care according to the concept of Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment – which is possibly best provided by older-friendly hospitals – appears as a constructive solution for reaching high degrees of both staff and patient satisfaction in geriatric care. More research is needed in this area.

  • 37.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Nordmark, S
    Lyhagen, J
    Lindberg, I
    Finch, T
    The Swedish version of the normalisation process theory measurement s-nomad: Translation, adaptation and pilot testing2018In: BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine, ISSN 2515-446X, Vol. 23, no Suppl 1, p. A33-A33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 38.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Nordmark, S
    Lyhagen, J
    Lindberg, I
    Finch, T
    The Swedish version of the Normalization Process Theory Measure S-NoMAD: Translation, adaptation and pilot testing2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Box 5626, SE-114 86 Stockholm, Sweden ; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala Science Park, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Elmgren Frykberg, Gunilla
    Uppsala universitet, Rehabiliteringsmedicin.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Uppsala universitet, Reglerteknik; Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Medio-lateral stability of sit-to-walk performance in older individuals with and without fear of falling2010In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 438-443Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik.
    Frykberg, G.
    Mellberg, Y.
    Halvorsen, Kjertan
    Medio-lateral stability of sit-to-walk performance in older individuals with and without fear of falling2009In: Proceedings of the XIX Conference of the International Society for Posture & Gait Research Bologna, Italy—June 21-25, 2009, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik.
    Frykberg, GE
    Uppsala universitet.
    Tarassova, Olga
    Uppsala universitet.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Uppsala universitet.
    Momentum-development and stability in sit-to-walk compared to sit-to-stand among older individuals with and without fear of falling2010In: 20th Nordic Congress of Gerontology 30 May – 2 June 2010 -  Reykjavík, Iceland: Program / Abstract Overview, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Grundström, A
    Cedervall, Y
    Dual-task timed up and go test as part of memory assessment: a pilot study2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala University.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Uppsala University.
    From, Ingrid
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Bruhn Bergman, Åsa
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Oestreicher, Lars
    Uppsala University.
    Melander-Wikman, Anita
    Luleå University of Technology.
    A study protocol for applying user participation and co-learning: lessons learned from the eBalance project2017In: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, ISSN 1661-7827, E-ISSN 1660-4601, Vol. 14, no 5, article id 512Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The eBalance project is based on the idea that serious exergames—i.e., computer gaming systems with an interface that requires physical exertion to play—that are well adapted to users, can become a substantial part of a solution to recognized problems of insufficient engagement in fall-prevention exercise and the high levels of fall-related injuries among older people. This project is carried out as a collaboration between eight older people who have an interest in balance training and met the inclusion criteria of independence in personal activities of daily living, access to and basic knowledge of a computer, four staff working with the rehabilitation of older adults, and an interdisciplinary group of six research coordinators covering the areas of geriatric care and rehabilitation, as well as information technology and computer science. This paper describes the study protocol of the project’s initial phase which aims to develop a working partnership with potential users of fall-prevention exergames, including its conceptual underpinnings. The qualitative methodology was inspired by an ethnographical approach implying combining methods that allowed the design to evolve through the study based on the participants’ reflections. A participatory and appreciative action and reflection (PAAR) approach, accompanied by inquiries inspired by the Normalization Process Theory (NPT) was used in interactive workshops, including exergame testing, and between workshop activities. Data were collected through audio recordings, photos, and different types of written documentation. The findings provide a description of the methodology thus developed and applied. They display a methodology that can be useful for the design and development of care service and innovations for older persons where user participation is in focus.

  • 44.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Lindmark, Birgitta
    Department of Neurosciences, Uppsala University, University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/02699052.2014.919534.
    Lithell, Hans
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Development and reliability of the General Motor Function Assessment Scale (GMF)--a performance-based measure of function-related dependence, pain and insecurity.2003In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 25, no 9, p. 462-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: To develop a scale for assessment of three components-dependence, pain and insecurity - related to motor functions of importance for activities of daily living among older rehabilitation patients and to establish its clinical practicality and reliability.

    METHOD: A General Motor Function Assessment Scale (GMF) with the above aims was constructed. Clinical practicality was explored by questionnaires to 14 physiotherapists. Inter-rater and test-retest reliability was tested on patients in three different forms of geriatric rehabilitation (n=20-25) and analysed by percentage agreement (PA) and a non-parametric statistical method, which provide measures of the random disagreement separately from the systematic part of the disagreement.

    RESULTS: In the clinical test the GMF was found to be time efficient and clinically adequate. Analysis of reliability showed overall high values of PA (PA> or =70) and of the rank-order agreement coefficient (r(a)>0.82), and low degrees of systematic disagreement.

    CONCLUSIONS: GMF was found to be a clinically useful assessment scale in geriatric rehabilitation. The statistical analyses indicted a high degree of reliability. Comparison of these results with reliability of comparable rating scales is difficult on account of the statistical methods used in other studies, which commonly do not take into account the non-metric properties of the data.

  • 45.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Medicinska och farmaceutiska vetenskapsområdet, Medicinska fakulteten, Institutionen för folkhälso- och vårdvetenskap, Geriatrik.
    Lindmark, Birgitta
    Lithell, Hans
    Evaluation and application of the General Motor Function assessment scale in geriatric rehabilitation2003In: Disability and Rehabilitation, Vol. 25, no 7, p. 360-8Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 46.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Uppsala ; The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Department of Community Medicine and Rehabilitation/Physiotherapy, Umeå University, Umeå.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Department of Health Science/Health and Rehabilitation, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Implementation of evidence-based prevention of falls in rehabilitation units: a staff's interactive approach2009In: Journal of Rehabilitation Medicine, ISSN 1650-1977, E-ISSN 1651-2081, Vol. 41, no 13, p. 1034-1040Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: To provide strategies to assist healthcare professionals in the area of rehabilitation to improve prevention of falls. DESIGN: A conceptual framework is described as a foundation for the proposal of 2 intertwined strategies, of intervention and implementation, which target the questions: Which strategies for intervention represent the current best evidence? and: How can these strategies be implemented and continuously developed? RESULTS: Strategies for multifactorial and multiprofessional fall preventive interventions are presented in terms of a "fall prevention pyramid model", including general, individualized, and acute interventions. A systematic global fall risk rating by the staff is recommended as an initial procedure. Fall event recording and follow-up are stressed as important components of local learning and safety improvement. Development of implementation strategies in 3 phases, focusing on interaction, facilitation and organizational culture, is described. CONCLUSION: A well-developed patient safety culture focusing on prevention of falls will, when successfully achieved, be seen by staff, patients and their significant others as being characteristic of the organization, and will be evident in attitudes, routines and actions. Moreover, it provides potential for positive side-effects concerning organizational and clinical improvements in additional areas.

  • 47.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Geriatrik ; Akademiska sjukhuset.
    Lundin-Olsson, Lillemor
    Umeå Universitet.
    Rosendahl, Erik
    Umeå Universitet.
    Nationell satsning för ökad patientsäkerhet: Fall och fallskador: åtgärder för att förebygga2011Other (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hepworth, Mike
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom.
    O´Reilly, Karen
    University of Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom.
    Lithell, Hans
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala University.
    Continuity of the self in later life: perceptions of informal caregivers2004In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 792-815Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Geriatrics, Uppsala University, PO Box 609, S-751 25, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sidenvall, Birgitta
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Hepworth, Mike
    Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.
    O´Reilly, Karen
    Department of Sociology and Anthropology, University of Aberdeen, Scotland, UK.
    Lithell, Hans
    Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Section of Geriatrics, Uppsala University, PO Box 609, S-751 25, Uppsala, Sweden.
    On Loss of activity and independence, adaptation improves life satisfaction in old age2005In: Quality of Life Research, ISSN 0962-9343, E-ISSN 1573-2649, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 1111-1125Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Åberg, Anna Cristina
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden ; Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences/Geriatrics, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Thorstensson, Alf
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tarassova, Olga
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halvorsen, Kjartan
    Uppsala universitet, Avdelningen för systemteknik ; School of Technology and Health, KTH-Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Calculations of mechanisms for balance control during narrow and single-leg standing in fit older adults: a reliability study2011In: Gait & Posture, ISSN 0966-6362, E-ISSN 1879-2219, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 352-357Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 50 of 50
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