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  • 1. Craftman Gransjöm, Å
    et al.
    Swall, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Outcomes of education in using music and caregivers singing as a tool to person centered care when working with persons with dementia2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2. Craftman, ÅG.
    et al.
    Swall, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Båkman, K.
    Grundberg, Å.
    Hagelin, C. L.
    Caring for older people with dementia reliving past trauma2020In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 27, no 2, p. 621-633Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 3.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalen University, Karolinska Institute.
    Alam, Moudud
    Dalarna University, School of Information and Engineering, Statistics.
    Olsen, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska Institutet.
    Swall, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Boström, A. -M
    Being Treated With Respect and Dignity?: Perceptions of Home Care Service Among Persons With Dementia2021In: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, ISSN 1525-8610, E-ISSN 1538-9375, no 3, p. 656-662Article in journal (Refereed)
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  • 4.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Lövenmark, Annica
    Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Swall, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    The benefits of caregiver singing and receptive music in dementia care: a qualitative study of professional caregivers' experiences2024In: Arts and Health, ISSN 1753-3015, E-ISSN 1753-3023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: For persons with dementia, receptive music may reduce negative expressions and increase positive ones. Caregiver singing (CS) is an intervention aimed at facilitating care situations and involves caregivers singing for or together with persons with dementia during care activities. In the literature, CS is commonly addressed as a music activity rather than a care intervention. The aim was to describe caregivers' experiences of the reactions of persons with dementia when using CS and receptive music in dementia care.

    METHOD: The data comprised three focus group interviews with 12 professional caregivers in dementia care, analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: the analysis resulted in two themes: "CS increases interaction and builds companionship" and "Receptive music soothes, awakens memories and reflects the person's self".

    CONCLUSION: Both CS and receptive music was shown to have positive influences, and while the results were sometimes intertwined, CS was shown to better facilitate problematic care situations.

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  • 5.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Swall, Anna
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Summer Meranius, Martina
    Ethical aspects of caregivers' experience with persons with dementia at mealtimes2016In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 624-635Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Persons with dementia are at risk of malnutrition and thus in need of assistance during mealtimes. Research suggest interventions for caregivers to learn how to facilitate mealtimes and eating, while other suggest a working environment enabling the encounter needed to provide high-quality care. However, the phenomenon of caring for this unique population needs to be elucidated from several perspectives before suggesting suitable implications that ensure their optimal health.

    OBJECTIVES: To illustrate the meanings within caregivers' experiences of caring for persons with dementia during mealtime situations. We also measured weight and food intake among individuals with dementia to explain better the phenomenon of caring for them during mealtimes.

    METHODS: Mixed method including focus group interviews with seven caregivers analyzed using phenomenological hermeneutics. In addition, for nine persons with dementia, weight and food intake were collected and descriptive statistics were calculated.

    ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS: Ethical review was obtained from an ethics committee, and all caregivers signed a consent form after being informed on the issue of research ethics. Relatives for persons with dementia were informed and signed the consent. In addition, throughout the study, the persons' expressions were observed aiming to respect their vulnerability, integrity, and dignity.

    FINDINGS: One theme emerged from interviews (struggling between having the knowledge and not the opportunity), which was built upon three subthemes (being engaged and trying; feeling abandoned and insufficient; being concerned and feeling guilty). Seven of nine persons with dementia lost a minimum of 1.3 kg of weight and ate a maximum of 49.7% of the food served.

    CONCLUSION: Caregivers struggle because they have knowledge about how to provide high-quality care but are unable to provide this care due to organizational structures. The weight loss and insufficient eating among the persons with dementia may support this conclusion. Sufficient time for adequate care should be provided.

  • 6.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    et al.
    Mälardalens högskola.
    Williamn, Christine
    Florida Atlantic University.
    Swall, Anna
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Engström, Gabriella
    Mälardalens högskola, Akademin för hälsa, vård och välfärd.
    Humming as a mean of communicating during meal time situations: A Single Case study involving a women with severe dementia and her caregiver2012In: Journal of Nursing Education and Practice, ISSN 1925-4040, E-ISSN 1925-4059, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 93-102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:

    ‘Music Therapeutic Caregiving’, when caregivers sing for or together with persons with dementia during morning care situations, has been shown to increase verbal and nonverbal communication between persons with dementia and their caregivers, as well as enhance positive and decrease negative emotions in persons with dementia. No studies about singing during mealtimes have been conducted, and this pilot project was designed to elucidate this. However, since previous studies have shown that there is a risk that persons with dementia will start to sing along with the caregiver, the caregiver in this study hummed such that the person with dementia did not sing instead of eat. The aim of this pilot project was threefold: to describe expressed emotions in a woman with severe dementia, and describe communication between her and her caregivers without and with the caregiver humming. The aim was also to measure food and liquid intake without and with humming.

    Method: The study was constructed as a Single Case ABA design in which the ordinary mealtime constituted a baseline which comprised a woman with severe dementia being fed by her caregivers in the usual way. The intervention included the same woman being fed by the same caregiver who hummed while feeding her. Data comprised video observations that were collected once per week over 5 consecutive weeks. The Verbal and Nonverbal Interaction Scale and Observed Emotion Rating Scale were used to analyze the recorded interactions.

    Results:

    A slightly positive influence of communication was shown for the woman with dementia, as well as for the caregiver. Further, the women with dementia showed a slight increase in expressions of positive emotions, and she ate more during the intervention.

    Conclusion:

    Based on this pilot study no general conclusions can be drawn. It can be concluded, however, that humming while feeding persons with dementia might slightly enhance communication, and positive expressed emotions in persons with dementia. To confirm this, more studies on group levels are needed. Because previous studies have found that caregiver singing during caring situations influences persons with dementia positively it might be desirable to test the same during mealtime.

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  • 7.
    Nordin, Susanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Swall, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Anåker, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    von Koch, Lena
    Elf, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Does the physical environment matter? - A qualitative study of healthcare professionals' experiences of newly built stroke units.2021In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 16, no 1, article id 1917880Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Organized care in specialist stroke units is fundamental for achieving better outcomes for persons with stroke. Although the importance of the physical environment for health and well-being is well recognized, research regarding how environmental features can influence stroke care is limited. The aim was to elucidate healthcare professionals' experiences of the physical environment in newly built stroke units with respect to stroke care.Methods: Healthcare professionals (n = 42) representing eight professions participated in semi-structured, face-to-face interviews. Qualitative content analysis was used.Results: The physical environment both facilitated and restricted the professionals' ability to provide stroke care. Five categories were identified: "Working towards patient engagement in single rooms", "Hampered rehabilitation in an environment not always adapted to patients' difficulties", "Addressing patients' psychosocial needs in the environment", "Ensuring patient safety by using the environment in accordance with individual needs", and "Collaboration and task fulfilment-a challenge due to care unit design".Conclusions: The healthcare professionals viewed the physical environment mainly in relation to stroke patients' specific needs, and several environmental features were considered poorly adapted to meet these needs. The physical environment is essential to high-quality care; thus, the process of planning and designing stroke units should be based on existing evidence.

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  • 8. Park, Juyoung
    et al.
    Newman, David
    Engström, Gabriella
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Swall, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    The moderating and covarying effects of social support and pain intensity on depressive symptomology among racially and ethnically diverse older adults2017In: Pain Management, ISSN 1758-1869, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 19-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To examine the interplay of social support, pain intensity and ethnicity as moderators and covariates of relationship on depressive symptomatology.

    METHODS: Racially and ethnically diverse elders responded to measures of depressive symptomatology and social support.

    RESULTS: Hispanics reported significantly higher prevalence of moderate pain intensity and depressive symptomology, and lower prevalence of high social support compared with other ethnic groups. Although social support showed reduced depressive symptomatology among those with high pain intensity, it did not play a significant role in decreasing depressive symptomatology among those with low/moderate pain intensity.

    CONCLUSION: Social support in decreasing depressive symptomatology is more effective in older adults with high pain intensity than those with moderate or low levels of pain intensity.

  • 9.
    Roos, Charlotte
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Care Sciences.
    Alam, Moudud
    Dalarna University, School of Information and Engineering, Statistics.
    Swall, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Factors associated with older persons’ perceptions of dignity and well-being over a three-year period: A retrospective national study in residential care facilities2022In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 515Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Dignity and well-being are central concepts in the care of older people, 65 years and older, world‑wide. The person-centred practice framework identifes dignity and well-being as person-centred outcomes. Older persons living in residential care facilities, residents, have described that they sometimes lack a sense of dignity and well-being, and there is a need to understand which modifable factors to target to improve this. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between perceptions of dignity and wellbeing and the independent variables of the attitudes of staf, the indoor-outdoor-mealtime environments, and individual factors for residents over a three-year period.

    Methods: A national retrospective longitudinal mixed cohort study was conducted in all residential care facilities within 290 municipalities in Sweden. All residents aged 65 years and older in 2016, 2017 and 2018 were invited to responded to a survey; including questions regarding self-rated health and mobility, the attitudes of staf, the indooroutdoor-mealtime environments, safety, and social activities. Data regarding age, sex and diagnosed dementia/pre‑scribed medication for dementia were collected from two national databases. Descriptive statistics and ordinal logistic regression models were used to analyse the data.

    Results: A total of 13 763 (2016), 13 251 (2017) and 12 620 (2018) residents answered the survey. Most of them (69%) were women and the median age was 88 years. The odds for satisfaction with dignity did not difer over the three-year period, but the odds for satisfaction with well-being decreased over time. Residents who rated their health as good, who were not diagnosed with dementia/had no prescribed medication for dementia, who had not experienced disrespectful attitudes of staf and who found the indoor-outdoor-mealtime environments to be pleasant had higher odds of being satisfed with aspects of dignity and well-being over the three-year period.

    Conclusions: The person-centred practice framework, which targets the attitudes of staf and the care environment, can be used as a theoretical framework when designing improvement strategies to promote dignity and well-being. Registered nurses, due to their core competencies, focusing on person-centred care and quality improvement work, should be given an active role as facilitators in such improvement strategies.

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  • 10.
    Roos, Charlotte
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Care Sciences. Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Alam, Moudud
    Dalarna University, School of Information and Engineering, Statistics.
    Swall, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Boström, Anne‐Marie
    Division of Nursing Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden;Theme Inflammation and Ageing, Unit Nursing Ageing Karolinska University Hospital Huddinge Sweden;Research and Development UnitStockholms Sjukhem Stockholm Sweden.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. Division of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; School of Health, Care and Social Welfare, Mälardalen University, Västerås, Sweden.
    Factors associated with perceptions of dignity and well‐being among older people living in residential care facilities in Sweden. A national cross‐sectional study2022In: Health & Social Care in the Community, ISSN 0966-0410, E-ISSN 1365-2524, Vol. 30, no 5, p. e2350-e2364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The care of older people living in residential care facilities (RCFs) should promote dignity and well-being, but research shows that these aspects are lacking in such facilities. To promote dignity and well-being, it is important to understand which associated factors to target. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between perceived dignity and well-being and factors related to the attitudes of staff, the care environment and individual issues among older people living in RCFs. A national retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in all RCFs for older people within 290 municipalities in Sweden. All older people 65 years and older (n = 71,696) living in RCFs in 2018 were invited to respond to the survey. The response rate was 49%. The survey included the following areas: self-rated health, indoor-outdoor-mealtime environment, performance of care, attitudes of staff, safety, social activities, availability of staff and care in its entirety. Data were supplemented with additional data from two national databases regarding age, sex and diagnosed dementia. Descriptive statistics and ordinal logistic regression models were used to analyse the data. Respondents who had experienced disrespectful treatment, those who did not thrive in the indoor-outdoor-mealtime environment, those who rated their health as poor and those with dementia had higher odds of being dissatisfied with dignity and well-being. To promote dignity and well-being, there is a need to improve the prerequisites of staff regarding respectful attitudes and to improve the care environment. The person-centred practice framework can be used as a theoretical framework for improvements, as it targets the prerequisites of staff and the care environment. As dignity and well-being are central values in the care of older people worldwide, the results of this study can be generalised to other care settings for older people in countries outside of Sweden.

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  • 11.
    Roos, Charlotte
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Swall, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm; Mälardalen University, Västerås.
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    Skytt, Bernice
    Promoting the person-centred aspects of dignity and well-being: learning from older persons’ experiences of living in residential care facilities2023In: Working with Older People, ISSN 1366-3666, E-ISSN 2042-8790, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 219-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – Dignity and well-being are key aspects of the legislation and policies that regulate care of olderpersons worldwide. In addition, care of older persons should be person-centred. Dignity and well-being aredescribed as results of person-centred care (PCC). The purpose of this study was to gain an understanding ofimportant aspects for older persons to experience dignity and well-being in residential care facilities (RCFs).

    Design/methodology/approach – This study had a qualitative approach, and individual semi-structuredinterviews were conducted with 20 older persons living in RCFs. Data were analysed using inductive contentanalysis.

    Findings – To experience dignity and well-being older persons emphasized the importance ofpreserving their identity. To do this, it was important to be able to manage daily life, to gain support andinfluence and to belong to a social context. However, the findings indicate a need for improvements.

    Practical implications – Insights into older persons’ experiences of important aspects for experiencingdignity and well-being in RCFs can be used by first-line managers and registered nurses when designingimprovement strategies to promote PCC.

    Originality/value – Dignity and well-being are described as results of PCC. The findings provide anunderstanding of what older persons perceive as important for experiencing dignity and well-being inRCFs. The findings are useful when designing improvement strategies to promote PCC.

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  • 12.
    Swall, Anna
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    "Being in the present": the meaning of the interaction between older persons with Alzheimer's disease and a therapy dog2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The number of persons with Alzheimer’s disease is increasing world-wide and the disease affects the persons, their families, the health care system and the economy within society worldwide. The symptoms and behaviours caused by Alzheimer’ disease may be difficult to manage for the person and their caregivers. Alternative methods are recommended before pharmacological treatment. The presence of a therapy dog has been described as beneficial, in for instance increasing well-being and alleviating symptoms and dementia behaviours. The overall aim of this thesis was to gain a deeper understanding of the influence of therapy dogs on persons with Alzheimer’s disease from the person’s and the dog handler’s perspectives. Further, adopting a longitudinal perspective, the study investigates the therapy dog’s influence on activity and sleep for persons with Alzheimer’s disease. Video observations of five persons with Alzheimer’s disease interacting with a therapy dog (I, II), as well as interviews with nine dog handlers (III) were gathered and transcribed. Data was analyzed using a phenomenological hermeneutical method (I, II, III). Registration of activity and sleep was conducted over a period of 16 weeks using an Actigraf that generated curves, and were then analysed using descriptive statistics (III). The time spent with the dog revealed memories and feelings resulting in existential thoughts of oneself and life, which then connected to the present situation (I). Distancing oneself from the symptoms of the disease when interacting with the dog showed a person functioning in the present with the dog, striving for the dog’s best and putting the dog before and above oneself (II). The therapy dog’s presence showed no pattern of effect on the patients’ daytime activity and sleep. The findings instead pointed to a great variety of possible different effects, bringing about increased activity at different time points, for example during night-time sleep (III), creating a respite from illness and contributing wordlessly to an existence but thoroughly directed by the dog handler, where the person was comfortable and took the initiative (IV). In conclusion, the therapy dog team’s presence with the person with Alzheimer’s disease induced meaning that allowed the person’s hidden qualities and abilities to develop and, when observed from a person-centred perspective, also brought out the individual in each person

  • 13.
    Swall, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Craftman, Åsa
    Grundberg, Åke
    Wiklund, Eleonor
    Väliaho, Nina
    Hagelin, Carina Lundh
    Dog handlers' experiences of therapy dogs' impact on life near death for persons with dementia2019In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, ISSN 1357-6321, E-ISSN 2052-286X, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 65-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:: Persons with dementia may have severe physical and psychological symptoms at the end of life. A therapy dog used in their care can provide comfort and relieve their anxiety. The dog handler guides the dog during the interaction with the patient.

    AIM:: To describe the impact of therapy dogs on people with dementia in the final stages of life from the perspective of the dog handler.

    METHODS:: Interviews were conducted and analysed using qualitative content analysis.

    FINDINGS:: The dog provides comfort and relief through its presence and by responding to the physical and emotional expressions of the dying person.

    CONCLUSIONS:: Interactions with dogs were found to have a positive impact on persons with dementia and eased the symptoms associated with end of life according to the dog handlers.

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  • 14.
    Swall, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Ebbeskog, Britt
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    'Bringing respite in the burden of illness' - dog handlers experience of visiting older persons with dementia together with a therapy dog2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 15-16, p. 2223-2231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To illuminate meanings of the lived experiences of dog handlers' when visiting older persons with dementia with their therapy dog.

    BACKGROUND:

    Studies indicate that care of persons with dementia should focus on a person-centred approach with the person's interests in the centre. Animal-assisted therapy using a therapy dog in the care of persons with dementia has been shown to increase well-being and decrease problematic behaviours associated with the illness.

    DESIGN:

    A qualitative lifeworld approach was adopted for this study.

    METHODS:

    Data were collected from open-ended interviews with nine dog handlers, and the analysis conducted using the phenomenological hermeneutical method.

    RESULTS:

    The structural analysis resulted in one theme, 'Respite from the burden of illness for persons with dementia'.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Visiting a person with dementia can be seen as an act of caring, providing temporary respite from their illness, and creating a special relationship between handler and patient. A therapy dog visit can represent a moment of communion between the handler and the person with dementia.

    IMPLICATION FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Dog handlers use their skills and knowledge to promote a situation that reduces symptoms of illness and encourages healthier behaviour. The results of this study may be of interest to researchers, clinical practitioners, caregivers and dog handlers who care for persons with dementia using therapy dog teams on prescription as an alternative method to minimise behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia.

  • 15.
    Swall, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Ebbeskog, Britt
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Can therapy dogs evoke awareness of one's past and present life in persons with Alzheimer's disease?2015In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 84-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Persons with Alzheimer's disease (AD) sometimes express themselves through behaviours that are difficult to manage for themselves and their caregivers, and to minimise these symptoms alternative methods are recommended. For some time now, animals have been introduced in different ways into the environment of persons with dementia. Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) includes prescribed therapy dogs visiting the person with dementia for a specific purpose.

    AIM: This study aims to illuminate the meaning of the lived experience of encounters with a therapy dog for persons with Alzheimer's disease.

    METHOD: Video recorded sessions were conducted for each visit of the dog and its handler to a person with AD (10 times/person). The observations have a life-world approach and were transcribed and analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutical approach.

    RESULTS: The result shows a main theme 'Being aware of one's past and present existence', meaning to connect with one's senses and memories and to reflect upon these with the dog. The time spent with the dog shows the person recounting memories and feelings, and enables an opportunity to reach the person on a cognitive level.

    CONCLUSIONS: The present study may contribute to health care research and provide knowledge about the use of trained therapy dogs in the care of older persons with AD in a way that might increase quality of life and well-being in persons with dementia.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The study might be useful for caregivers and dog handlers in the care of older persons with dementia.

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  • 16.
    Swall, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Ebbeskog, Britt
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Stepping out of the shadows of Alzheimer's disease: a phenomenological hermeneutic study of older persons with Alzheimer's disease caring for a therapy dog2017In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 12, no 1, article id 1347013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Living with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) can involve a person being unable to recall and convey information in daily life. There are several ways to provide person-centred care to older people with AD, e.g. by empowering them in a situation. The use of animal-assisted therapy (AAT) with a therapy dog in the care of people with dementia is increasing, with the presence of a therapy dog being described as improving, among other things, the well-being and socialization of the person. The aim of this study was to illuminate meanings of care for people with AD in their encounters with a therapy dog.

    Method: The study used video-recorded observations of the person with AD and the dog. Data were transcribed and analysed using a phenomenological hermeneutic method.

    Results: The main theme was “Using one’s own resources and abilities as a human being”, which meant being the person one can be and distancing oneself from the symptoms of AD during the time with the dog.

    Conclusions: The feelings evoked in the people with AD included empathy and altruism, which allowed for a sense of joy and tenderness, which may induce a sense of self-worth, of being needed, and of being meaningful.

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  • 17.
    Swall, Anna
    et al.
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    Fagerberg, Ingegerd
    Ebbeskog, Britt
    Lundh Hagelin, Carina
    Sophiahemmet Högskola.
    A therapy dog's impact on daytime activity and night-time sleep for older persons with Alzheimer's disease: a case study2014In: Clinical Nursing Studies, ISSN 2324-7940, E-ISSN 2324-7959, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 80-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Animal-Assisted Therapy using dogs have been described as having a calming effect, decrease sundowning and blood-pressure in persons with Alzheimer’s disease. The aim was to investigate how continuous and scheduled visits by a prescribed therapy dog affected daytime and night-time sleep for persons with Alzheimer’s disease.

    Methods: In this case study, registration of activity and sleep curves was conducted from five persons with moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease living at a nursing home, over a period of 16 weeks using an Actiwatch. Data was analysed with descriptive statistics.

    Result: The study shows no clear pattern of effect on individual persons daytime activity and sleep when encounter with a therapy dog, but instead points to a great variety of possible different effects that brings an increased activity at different time points, for example during night-time sleep.

    Conclusions: Effects from the use of a Animal-Assisted Therapy with a dog in the care of persons with Alzheimer’s disease needs to be further investigated and analysed from a personcentred view including both daytime and nightime activities.

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  • 18.
    Swall, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Welfare, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalen University.
    Boström, Anne-Marie
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Huddinge; Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm; Stockholms Sjukhem, Stockholm.
    Listen to the voices of nurses: the role of community chief nurses and registered nurses in the provision of care for older people in Sweden during the COVID-19 pandemic - a cross-sectional study2024In: BMC Geriatrics, E-ISSN 1471-2318, Vol. 24, no 1, article id 127Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: During the pandemic in Sweden, the aim was to protect older people, especially those among them who were sick, frail and vulnerable in residential care facilities. A ban was put on visits at all residential care facilities in March 2020 to prevent the spread of infection among the older people. This study aims to describe the experiences of Community Chief Nurses and Registered Nurses who provided medical and nursing care for older people in residential care facilities and home care during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, and to examine factors associated with the quality of care.

    METHODS: The study has a mixed method cross-sectional design (STROBE). Data were collected using a web-based survey that comprised two questionnaires, for Community Chief Nurses and Registered Nurses developed for the study. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression models, as well as qualitative content analyses.

    RESULTS: The majority of Community Chief Nurses reported adequate opportunities to work with management to handle the COVID-19 pandemic. The Registered Nurses reported that the quality of care, as well as the person's safety, was negatively affected during the pandemic. Factors associated with good care were as follows: information-sharing; ability to comply with hygiene practices; competence in how to care for older persons with COVID-19; a physician at bedside assessing their health; and support from frontline managers.

    CONCLUSION: The study highlights crucial facets that care organizations must address to enhance their readiness for future pandemics or disasters, ensuring the security and well-being of the older people.

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  • 19.
    Swall, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Mälardalen University; Karolinska Institute.
    Gransjön Craftman, Åsa
    Sophiahemmet University.
    Like a bridge over troubled water: a qualitative study of professional caregiver singing and music as a way to enable person-centred care for persons with dementia2020In: International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health and Well-being, ISSN 1748-2623, E-ISSN 1748-2631, Vol. 15, no 1, article id 1735092Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To describe the perspectives of caregivers in terms of using singing and music in their everyday work, and of their effect on care and interaction with the person with dementia.Methods: A qualitative design was used, consisting of group discussions with professional caregivers from three nursing homes in a medium-sized city in a rural area of Sweden.Results: The results demonstrate that caregiver singing and music can be powerful and useful in the care of and in communication with persons with dementia. Music, for example, can be used to facilitate socialization as it opens up for discussion, while caregiver singing was preferable when it came to the facilitation of care situations and interaction.Conclusions: Singing and music can be powerful and useful tools in the care of and in communication with persons with dementia. Regardless of whether singing or music is used, the most important factor is that a person-centred approach is adopted so as to make the music a facilitative tool. Caregiver singing and music are ways to connect with the person with dementia and an understanding of their use can contribute to dementia research. This in turn can increase awareness of the possible ways to strengthen the partnership between caregivers and persons with dementia.

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  • 20.
    Swall, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Williams, Christine
    Marmstål Hammar, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska Institute; Mälardalen University.
    The value of “us”: Expressions of togetherness in couples where one spouse has dementia2020In: International Journal of Older People Nursing, ISSN 1748-3735, E-ISSN 1748-3743, Vol. 15, no 2, article id e12299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Living with dementia involves both illness and health, and self-care and care from others. As most persons with dementia live in their own homes, dementia affects not only the person with the disease, but also family, commonly the partner. Research shows that spousal carers feel as though they are losing their partners since they can no longer share thoughts, feelings and experiences as a couple. Aim The aim of the study was to describe the sense of togetherness of the spouses when one spouse has dementia. Method The sample consists of 18 recorded conversations between 15 persons with dementia and their spouses. The filmed conversations were transcribed verbatim and then analysed using qualitative content analysis. Findings One overarching theme arose: Dementia preserved and challenged the value of ?us.? It can be challenging for a couple in which one partner has dementia to preserve a sense of togetherness and to have the relationship they wish for. Conclusion Based on our results, we suggest that practitioners should help couples to strengthen their bond as a couple so as to maintain a sense of well-being. Future studies should examine couplehood under differing conditions, such as long- versus short-term relationships. Prior relationship quality may also be a factor that influences the sense of couplehood following a serious health challenge, such as dementia. Implication for practice When spouses were able to live together, their relationship was enriched at many levels. Their love for each other strengthened them as a unit ? as an ?us? ? where togetherness seemed to be strong. Future studies need to examine whether the sense of couplehood varies depending on the length of the relationship (i.e., a relationship of many years or a relatively new relationship).

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