du.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Cross-Cultural Communication in Next Generation Language Learning: A Case Study of Chinese as a Foreign Language2011In: Proceedings of the Young Scholar Award Competition for the International Conference on Chinese Language Learning and Teaching in the Digital Age, Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Institute of Education , 2011, , p. 19p. 1-16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Along with the growth of globalization, the importance of developing student’s competence of cross-cultural communication have been emphasized constantly in foreign language education. When a teacher, who is a native Chinese speaker, teaches Chinese as a foreign language to foreign students, the whole process is thus not just “teaching a foreign language”, but also a “cross-culture communication”. In China, the concept of cross-culture communication did not draw much attention in teaching Chinese as foreign language until the 1980s, when a controversial and still ongoing debate started. Despite there are already some generally accepted conclusions that cross-cultural communication approach should be emphasized and implemented in teaching Chinese as foreign language, Chinese is still mostly taught to foreigners in the traditional way owing to the lack of empirical work, resources and supports. Therefore, there is an urgent need for research of implementing the cross-cultural communication approach in both teaching and learning Chinese as a foreign language.

    Chinese as a foreign language is now available in both traditional and distance modes. In the last few years, global demand for learning Chinese as a foreign language has been dramatically increasing. And since the traditional mode of education cannot satisfy specific needs of some students, a new generation of distance education, supported by the fast maturing videoconferencing software and the web-based learning in general, generates new alternatives and possibilities for both teaching and learning Chinese as a foreign language. However, this development also constitutes specific challenges for both teachers and students.

    With respond to the challenges, a trial of an action research was designed to investigate scope of possibilities (and their limitations) in implementing cross-cultural communication approach into web-based courses of Chinese as a foreign language. The research brought together two areas of current research on teaching foreign languages: (1) the cross-cultural communication perspective and (2) the distance/internet-based education. 

  • 2.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Cross-Cultural Communication in Next Generation Language Learning: A Case Study of Chinese as a Foreign Language2011In: Proceedings of the Young Scholar Award Competition for the International Conference on Chinese Language Learning and Teaching in the Digital Age, Hong Kong: The Hong Kong Institute of Education , 2011, , p. 19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Along with the growth of globalization, the importance of developing student’s competence of cross-cultural communication have been emphasized constantly in foreign language education. When a teacher, who is a native Chinese speaker, teaches Chinese as a foreign language to foreign students, the whole process is thus not just “teaching a foreign language”, but also a “cross-culture communication”. In China, the concept of cross-culture communication did not draw much attention in teaching Chinese as foreign language until the 1980s, when a controversial and still ongoing debate started. Despite there are already some generally accepted conclusions that cross-cultural communication approach should be emphasized and implemented in teaching Chinese as foreign language, Chinese is still mostly taught to foreigners in the traditional way owing to the lack of empirical work, resources and supports. Therefore, there is an urgent need for research of implementing the cross-cultural communication approach in both teaching and learning Chinese as a foreign language.

    Chinese as a foreign language is now available in both traditional and distance modes. In the last few years, global demand for learning Chinese as a foreign language has been dramatically increasing. And since the traditional mode of education cannot satisfy specific needs of some students, a new generation of distance education, supported by the fast maturing videoconferencing software and the web-based learning in general, generates new alternatives and possibilities for both teaching and learning Chinese as a foreign language. However, this development also constitutes specific challenges for both teachers and students.

    With respond to the challenges, a trial of an action research was designed to investigate scope of possibilities (and their limitations) in implementing cross-cultural communication approach into web-based courses of Chinese as a foreign language. The research brought together two areas of current research on teaching foreign languages: (1) the cross-cultural communication perspective and (2) the distance/internet-based education. 

  • 3.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Enhancing intercultural communication in teaching chinese as a foreign language: An action research study2015Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past few decades, the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization worldwide have required a shift in the focus of Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) towards competence in intercultural communication in which the role of culture in the acquisition of CFL and in the pragmatic use of the language is emphasized and promoted. However, most of the current research in this academic area remains only on a theoretical level. Practical examples, particularly with regard to distance learning/teaching of the Chinese language, are very limited. This motivated the implementation of an action research study which aimed at exploring the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and applying intercultural communication theory into a contemporary distance CFL course for beginners. By observing and comparing the performance of subjects in the control and experimental groups, this action research study focuses on exploring three basic areas. Firstly, it discloses the cultural elements which underlie effective daily communication. Secondly, it investigates how students acquire cultural knowledge and develop their ability to competently communicate in the target course. And thirdly, it evaluates how the modified course syllabus could enhance students’ intercultural communicative competence. The findings of the research aim to serve as both a resource and reference for educators and researchers who are interested in carrying out reforms and research in this academic domain.

  • 4.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Enhancing Intercultural Communication in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language: An Action Research Study2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Enhancing Intercultural Communication in Teaching Chinese as a Foreign Language – An Action Research Study

    Over the past few decades, the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization worldwide have required a shift in the focus of Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) towards competence in intercultural communication in which the role of culture in the acquisition of CFL and in the pragmatic use of the language is emphasized and promoted. However, most of the current research in this academic area remains only on a theoretical level. Practical examples, particularly with regard to distance learning/teaching of the Chinese language, are very limited.

    This motivated the implementation of an action research study which aimed at exploring the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and applying intercultural communication theory into a contemporary distance CFL course for beginners. By observing and comparing the performance of subjects in the control and experimental groups, this action research study focuses on exploring three basic areas. Firstly, it discloses the cultural elements which underlie effective daily communication. Secondly, it investigates how students acquire cultural knowledge and develop their ability to competently communicate in the target course. And thirdly, it evaluates how the modified course syllabus could enhance students’ intercultural communicative competence. The findings of the research aim to serve as both a resource and reference for educators and researchers who are interested in carrying out reforms and research in this academic domain.

  • 5.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Enhancing Intercultural Communicative Competence in Chinese L2 Education – An Action Research2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the 21st Century, Chinese L2 is facing new challenges caused by the rapid development of information communication technology and internationalization. In this changing global context, how Chinese L2 learners effectively perform intercultural communication has become a crucial element in this education. While it is agreed that intercultural communication competence should be included in the present Chinese L2 education, practical research, such as how to integrate cultural elements into an existing course’s syllabus, remains an open field for scholars and teachers to explore.

    This action research endeavors to fill this research gap by exploring the scope of possibilities and limitations in implementing intercultural communication theory into an Internet-based Chinese L2 course for beginners at the university level and by investigating how it could enhance learners’ intercultural communication competence. The research applies a modified framework for communicative competence of second language education which is originally proposed by Usó-Juan and Martinez-Flor’s (2006). The theory suggests that when enhancing the learners’ intercultural communication competence in a foreign language education, it will gradually enhance the learners’ overall performance in linguistic, pragmatic and strategic competence.

    Action research seems to be well suited methodology in this study since it allows the researcher (who is also the teacher of the target course) to gather evaluative and reflective data from a direct/insider’s experience. In order to minimize the risk of subjectivity in the action research, this research also applies traditional research methodology, such as distributing and analyzing questionnaires, documentary data collections, in-depth interview, etc.

    The first research session of this research was designed to investigate the control groups in 2013 in which the researcher observed how students learned in the target course in its original settings. The data of the control group was then be used as a reference for the experimental groups in 2014 when the students were taught by modified teaching materials in which intercultural communication were highlighted.

    This paper will focus on presenting the findings of the first session of this research: (1) what the cultural elements explicitly and implicitly integrated into this language course are, and (2) how these cultural elements affect students’ intercultural communication in different social scenarios, such as introducing themselves and presenting other people, making phone calls, responding to compliments, etc. The findings are a valuable reference and a stepping-stone towards the second session of this action research in 2014. 

  • 6.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Flipping the Classroom – Integrating Intercultural Communication Competence into a Chinese Foreign Language Course2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of information communicative technology today not only accelerates the pace of internationalization and globalization but also shape the modes of human communication. Facing this overwhelming challenge, the cross-cultural and societal aspects of pragmatics, intercultural communication competence has especially become one of the main focuses in second/foreign language education worldwide.

    Responding to this challenge, the latest issued official documents for Chinese as a second/foreign language education in China propose a renewed syllabus, emphasizing the importance of culture as an integral element in effective communication. However, how to integrate intercultural communication theories into present foreign language courses remains mostly on a theoretical level. Very few practical or empirical studies have been done in this academic arena.

    This motivated the implementation of an action research in 2013 which aims to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and intercultural communication theory into a present Chinese foreign language course for beginners. The research utilizes an interactive online learning platform to deliver a series of online tasks - “flipping the classroom” – to explicitly demonstrate how cultural differences affect the language used by Chinese, English and Swedish speakers. Through case studies and other brainstorming activities, the tasks gradually enhance the students’ awareness of cross-cultural differences in varying social situations.

    This paper will present the findings of this action research, in particular, the design and implementation of the online tasks for “flipping the classroom”, such as: 1) the characteristics of this interactive online tool, “flipping the classroom”; 2) the cultural elements and intercultural communication theory included in the online tasks; 3) the specific tasks integrated into the enhanced course; 4) student response to the tasks and 5) the effectiveness of these tasks in developing students’ intercultural communication competence. 

  • 7.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Intercultural Communicative Competence in Teaching and Learning Chinese as a Foreign Language2014In: CLTA-GNY 2014 Annual Conference 12th New York International Conference on Teaching Chinese: May 3-4, 2014, New York University and Nanjing University, NY, USA: 2014 Annual Conference Program, New York, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, our world has experienced enormous changes due to the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization. In response to these changes, intercultural communication has become the central focus of foreign language education in the West in which the pragmatic use of the foreign language is emphasized and promoted.

    Following these trends, the intercultural communication perspective has drawn the attention of Chinese scholars and gradually became one of the controversial issues in the teaching of Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL). During the debate, a consensus has now been reached that intercultural communication should be a key feature of CFL education and “culture and communication” is placed as one of the main modules in CFL teachers’ education. However, most of the present research in this area is still remains only on the theoretical level. The practical implementation of the intercultural communication perspective remains an open field for scholars and teachers to explore.

    In order to explore practical ways of implementing intercultural communication theory in CFL education, this paper investigates four questions: (1) What does “intercultural communication” mean in the teaching of CFL? (2) What are the elements of culture in the Chinese language? (3) How can the framework of intercultural communicative competence be implemented into present-day education of CFL? (4) How can the effectiveness of applying intercultural communicative competence theory in CFL be measured?

    In order to provide answers to these questions, the paper presents an action research designed to revise an existing CFL course for beginners and aims to investigate the scope of possibilities and the limitations in implementing the intercultural communication approach in the CFL teaching and learning. The paper also presents a pilot study serving as a valuable reference and a stepping-stone towards more comprehensive research.

  • 8.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Role of Culture in the Acquisition of CSL – From the Perspective of Intercultural Communication Competence2015In: The 21st International Conference of the International Association for Intercultural Communication Studies (IAICS) cum The 11th Biennual International Conference of the China Association for Intercultural Communication (CAFIC): Culture, Communication, and Hybridity in an Age of Globalization, Hong Kong, 2015, p. 130-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, the demands for coping with the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization worldwide have shifted the focus of Chinese as a second language (CSL) towards intercultural communication competence in which the role of culture in the acquisition of CSL and in the pragmatic use of the language is emphasized and promoted. However, most of the present research in this academic area still remains only on a theoretical level.

     

    In order to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and implementing intercultural communication theory into CSL education, an action research has been conducted since the beginning of 2013 to review an actual course for beginners. This paper will present the findings of the research: 1) By applying the theoretical framework of intercultural communicative competence, the findings indicated that the existing CSL course provided limited information explaining the cultural elements that are reflected in the Chinese language. 2) The findings also suggested that the cultural skills acquired in the students’ first language do influence their acquisition of CSL. This is demonstrated in the students’ written tasks such as introducing themselves and presenting other people, etc. The findings can be examples and resources for further research in this academic field.     

  • 9.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Role of Culture in the Acquisition of CSL – From the Perspective of Intercultural Communication Competence2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, the demands for coping with the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization worldwide have shifted the focus of Chinese as a second language (CSL) towards intercultural communication competence in which the role of culture in the acquisition of CSL and in the pragmatic use of the language is emphasized and promoted. This standpoint is highlighted explicitly in the recently issued official documents of CSL education in China, 2008.

    However, most of the present research in this academic area still remains only on a theoretical level. Additional practical research related to how culture affects the acquisition of CSL; how culture should be integrated into present CSL courses, as well as how intercultural communication theories should be implemented in this education, remain an open field for scholars and teachers to explore.

    In order to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and implementing intercultural communication theory into CSL education, an action research has been conducted since the beginning of 2013 to review an actual course for beginners. The first phase of the research focuses on: (1) what the cultural elements explicitly and implicitly integrated into this language course are, and (2) how these cultural elements affect students’ acquisition of CSL.

    This paper will present the findings of the data collection from 2013. By applying the theoretical framework of intercultural communicative competence, the findings indicated that the existing CSL course provided limited information explaining the cultural elements that are reflected in the Chinese language. The findings also suggested that the cultural skills acquired in the students’ first language do influence their acquisition of CSL. This is demonstrated in the students’ written tasks such as introducing themselves and presenting other people, making phone calls, responding to compliments, etcBased on the findings of the first phrase, the second stage of the research aims to implement intercultural communicative theory in the existing CSL course and examines the effectiveness of such modification of the course.

  • 10.
    Ip, Wei Hing
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Video Conferencing: Advantages and Limitations in Teaching Intercultural Communication in Foreign Language Education2012In: Proceedings of the 5th edition of the international conference “ICT for Language Learning”, Florence, Italy, 15 -16 November 2012, Italy: Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2012, p. 349-352Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The introduction of video conferencing platforms such as Skype, Adobe Connect, Marratech, etc., initiated a revolution in distance foreign language education. This new virtual classroom allows direct and instant interaction between teachers and students throughout the world, as well as among students themselves. Nonetheless, video conferencing also poses new challenges, such as the necessity of developing new teaching methodologies, pedagogies and modified syllabi. This new technology also generates difficulties and limitations due to the technological requirements needed for this interaction. Since current trends in foreign language education have shifted towards the promotion of intercultural communication competence which has its own specific teaching methods and tools, successful distance foreign language programs require innovative solutions that take into account both the developments in communication technology and intercultural educational perspectives in a synergistic way. The main focus of the paper is to bring together these two areas and to shed light on how the instant virtual language learning environment provided by video conferencing can help us in the implementation of the theory of intercultural communication in foreign language education. In order to examine this question, the paper presents a case study based on an action research designed for modifying a traditional beginners’ course of Chinese as a foreign language in Sweden. The research deals with revising the existing course syllabus, applying a task-based learning methodology and adding authentic video conferencing materials for the learners. The paper presents a pilot study that was conducted in order to explore the possibilities and limitations generated by video conferencing technology from the perspective of the theory of intercultural communication in foreign language education. The results of the study provide an important starting point for a new direction for research in this field.

  • 11.
    Lindgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, French.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Malmsten, Solveig
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Swedish.
    Charlotte Lindgren intervjuar Wei Hing Rosenkvist och Solveig Malmsten inför Grammatikdagen 2017 vid Högskolan Dalarna2017Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 12.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Children, Gender and Chinese Mother Tongue Education in Sweden2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chinese language education in Chinese societies is not only a language subject but also a kind of moral education influenced by Confucianism. As part of culture and social values, gender identity and division of labour have been shaped by the education for more then a millennium.

     

    Similar to Chinese language education in Chinese societies, Chinese mother tongue education in Sweden has inherited the Confucian tradition which aims at inculcating one’s morality. However, Chinese mother tongue education in Sweden has its unique geographic environment – a European country with significant historical and cultural differences compared with the Chinese society. The Chinese students, who are engaged in the education, are situated in a multicultural matrix where they have to negotiate between and/or to integrate their own culture with the Swedish during their socialization of gender. By investigating how the Chinese children respond to and deal with the teaching materials in Chinese mother tongue education in Sweden, this study tries to reveal the role of children in establishing their gender identity in a multicultural society.  

  • 13.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Flipping the Classroom – Integrating Intercultural Communication Competence into a Chinese Foreign Language Course2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The rapid development of information communicative technology today not only accelerates the pace of internationalization and globalization but also shape the modes of human communication. Facing this overwhelming challenge, the cross-cultural and societal aspects of pragmatics, intercultural communication competence has especially become one of the main focuses in second/foreign language education worldwide. 

    Responding to this challenge, the latest issued official documents for Chinese as a second/foreign language education in China propose a renewed syllabus, emphasizing the importance of culture as an integral element in effective communication. However, how to integrate intercultural communication theories into present foreign language courses remains mostly on a theoretical level. Very few practical or empirical studies have been done in this academic arena.

    This motivated the implementation of an action research in which aims to explore the possibilities and limitations of integrating Chinese culture and intercultural communication theory into a present Chinese foreign language course for beginners. The research utilizes an interactive online learning platform to deliver a series of online tasks - “flipping the classroom” – to explicitly demonstrate how cultural differences affect the language used by Chinese, English and Swedish speakers. Through case studies and other brainstorming activities, the tasks gradually enhance the students’ awareness of cross-cultural differences in varying social situations.

    This paper will present the findings of this action research, in particular, the design and implementation of the online tasks for “flipping the classroom”, such as: 1) the characteristics of this interactive online tool, “flipping the classroom”; 2) the cultural elements and intercultural communication theory included in the online tasks; 3) the specific tasks integrated into the enhanced course; 4) student response to the tasks and 5) the effectiveness of these tasks in developing students’ intercultural communication competence.

    Key words: Chinese as a second language, culture, cultural pragmatics, intercultural communication, intercultural communicative competence, action research

  • 14.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Intercultural Communication in Teaching Chinese2011In: LMS Lingua, ISSN 0023-6330, no 2, p. 46-49Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past few decades, our world has experienced enormous changes due to the rapid development of information communication technology, internationalization and globalization. At the same time, intercultural communication has become the central focus of foreign language education in the West. Following this trend, intercultural communication in Chinese as a Foreign Language (CFL) has gradually drawn scholars’ attention in the East and became one of the controversial issues in the teaching of Chinese. In China, “culture and communication” were placed as one of the main modules in teachers’ education in 2007.  However, most of the present research in this area focuses on the theoretical level and debates concerning how intercultural communication theory should be implemented in teaching and learning CFL.  

  • 15.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Chinese.
    Pros and cons of Chinese language distance courses2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Because for some students in Sweden it is not possible to follow traditional university courses of Chinese as a second language, at our university we have developed several distance courses covering the whole first year of Chinese studies. In this paper I am focusing on pros and cons of distance courses of Chinese language compared to the traditional ones, both from the students' and teachers' point of view.

     

    While traditional courses have advantage in the fact that teacher can more easily create  supportive environment in the classroom, the interaction between the teacher and the students in distance courses is limited by the technology used (in our case: an e-conference software is used). A wide variety of teaching approaches can be used and both students and teachers get immediate and direct feedback. It is also less difficult to create good learning atmosphere.

     

    However, we have realized that distance courses are actually preferred by some students, who would have "mental blocks" in classroom environment. Moreover, distance courses lead to a higher motivation to prepare for the lessons due to smaller groups where everybody has to participate. In effect students either use the almost individual help provided by teachers and prepare regularly or simply drop out.

  • 16.
    Rosenkvist, Wei Hing
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Chinese. The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong.
    Teaching Intercultural Communication in Foreign Language Education through Video Conferencing2013In: LMS Lingua, ISSN 0023-6330, no 1, p. 20-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since 1980s, Western linguists and specialists on second language acquisition have emphasized the importance of enhancing students’ intercultural communication competence in foreign language education. At the same time, the demand for intercultural communicative competence increased along with the advances of communication technology with its increasingly global reach and the process of globalization itself.In the field of distance language education, these changes have resulted in a shift of focus from the production and distribution of learning materials towards communication and learning as a social process, facilitated by various internet-based platforms. The current focus on learners interacting and communicating synchronously trough videoconferencing is known as the fourth generation of distance language education.

    Despite the fact that teaching of Chinese as a foreign language (CFL) faces the same or even greater challenges as teaching other languages, the intercultural communication perspective is still quite a new trend in CFL and its implementation and evaluation are still under development. Moreover, the advocates of the new trends in CFL have so far focused almost exclusively on classroom-based courses, neglecting the distance mode of CFL and leaving it as an open field for others to explore.

    In this under-researched context, Dalarna University (Sweden), where I currently work, started to provide web-based courses of the Chinese language in 2007. Since 2010, the Chinese language courses have been available only in the distance form, using the same teaching materials as the previous campus-based courses. The textbooks used in both settings basically followed the functional nationalism approach. However, in order to catch up with the main trend of foreign-language education, we felt a need to implement the cross-cultural dimension into the distance courses as well. Therefore in 2010, a pilot study has been carried out to explore opportunities and challenges for implementing a cross-cultural perspective into existing courses and evaluating the effectiveness of this implementation based on the feedback of the students and on the experience of the teacher/researcher.

1 - 16 of 16
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • chicago-author-date
  • chicago-note-bibliography
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf