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  • 1.
    Gray, David
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Andrew Carpenter (ed.), The Poems of Olivia Elder (Dublin: Irish Manuscript Commission, 2017)2018In: Eighteenth-Century Ireland, ISSN 0790-7915, Vol. 33, p. 193-196Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Gray, David
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    “Command these elements to silence”: Ecocriticism and The Tempest2020In: Literature Compass, E-ISSN 1741-4113Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As part of the response in the humanities to rising concerns of the human influence on the Earth system, ecocriticism - an interdisciplinary approach to the study of literature focused on ecological and environmental concerns - became a major trend in literary and cultural studies by the first decade of the twenty-first century. This period also witnessed an increase in ecocritical studies of Shakespeare's works, which have continued to proliferate. It is timely therefore to consider those individual works that have interested ecocritics and featured in ecocritical studies. This article will provide just such a consideration of Shakespeare's final play, The Tempest (1611), providing a critical review of the play's ecocritical studies thus far, and drawing attention to central ideas and common themes in the process. Finally, the article offers its own ecocritical analysis of the play, based on historical accounts of a catastrophic tidal event that took place in south-west England, in 1607.

  • 3.
    Gray, David
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Nordic Hub: Virtual Mobility and the Development of Minority Cultures and Languages in Europe2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper will explore two areas: the promotion of Ulster-Scots, particularly in northern Europe, as a minority language and culture; and the opportunities for Dalarna University to support virtual mobility and foster a sustainable research network.

    The Dalarna Centre for Irish Studies (DUCIS) is well established in the Nordic countries, has strong links with existing networks, such as the Nordic Irish Studies Network and the Nordic Association of English Studies, and produces the Nordic Irish Studies journal in-house; all of which could help to facilitate the development of Ulster-Scots studies in northern Europe and beyond.

    Dalarna University is also a leading institution for online learning, and has a new research profile in Intercultural Studies. The existing online learning platforms that we can offer could be used to cultivate and support collegiality, research opportunities and educational resources. As well as providing an online meeting space for the network (with technical support), our online learning environment is currently used to teach 11 languages, including English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, and Russian; and thus this paper will suggest that there are possibilities for the development of educational resources, specifically through the development of online co-taught courses in minority cultures and languages in Europe.

  • 4.
    Gray, David
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English. Ulster University.
    Northern Stars: The Ulster-Scots Literary Tradition and the North-West2013Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 5.
    Gray, David
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English. Ulster University.
    Postgraduate Experience: The Use of Digital/Online Resources in the Creation of Teaching Materials2014In: Ulster Poetry in the Digital Age: Creativity, Innovation and Professional Practice, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Gray, David
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Solastalgia, Nostalgia, Exhilarating, Immersive: Landscapes: Heritage II2019In: Landscapes: the Journal of the International Centre for Landscape and Language, ISSN 1448-0778, Vol. 9, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Gray, David
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Sport and Conflict/Sport and Conflict Resolution: A Future for Northern Ireland2015Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 8.
    Gray, David
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    ‘Stemmed from the Scots’? The Ulster-Scots Literary Braird and the Pastoral Tradition2017In: Eighteenth-Century Ireland, ISSN 0790-7915, Vol. 32, p. 28-43Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the pastoral tradition in Ulster-Scots literature, an emergent form of Irish cultural expression in the eighteenth century. A late eighteenth-century flourishing of Ulster-Scots poetry has often been associated with an East Ulster regional paradigm: the rustic poet, small farmer, egalitarian and Presbyterian, Ulster Scot of Antrim and Down. However this article argues that Ulster-Scots literature begins almost a century earlier, and that the environments depicted in the literary works studied herein, range from the pastoralised landscape of north-west Ireland, and the rugged mountains of Donegal, to the urban, carnivalised confessional spaces of central Dublin. This revision of the growth of Ulster-Scots literature is further complicated by the presence of a ubiquitous Anglo-Irish print culture.

  • 9.
    Gray, David
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    The Story of Environment: The Promotion of Literature, Reading and Sustainability2016Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 10.
    Gray, David
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    The Vagaries of Radicalism: Ulster-Scots Literary Responses to the Abortive 1798 Rebellion of United Irishmen2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In the final decades of the eighteenth century, dissenting fervour among asignificant element of Ulster-Scots in the North of Ireland, many of whom were Presbyterians of different stripes, can be gauged by the literary output of the Norther Star, an Irish newspaper that was the mouthpiece for the politically radical and republican Society of United Irishmen. The Belfast-based newspaper was consequently suppressed by the British army in 1797, and the execution of the Co. Down, Presbyterian minister James Porter in 1798 is commonly attributed to his scathing and satirical political squibs on landlordism in Ulster, published in the Northern Star. Subsequently, this paper seeks to demonstrate that while Ulster-Scots literature published in the decades following the rebellion can rightly be characterised by political apostasy, and the abandonment of radicalism; individual writers chose to express their reactions through a variety of literary forms, attitudes and themes, which range from outright disillusionment to rapprochement with the establishment.

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