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  • 1.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History. University of Warwick, UK; Royal Swedish Academy of Science, Sweden.
    Charted Companies2016In: The Encyclopedia of Empire / [ed] John Mackenzie, Wiley Online Library , 2016Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Cheap and cheerful: Chinese silks in Scandinavia, 1731-17612017In: Eighteenth-century studies, ISSN 0013-2586, E-ISSN 1086-315X, Vol. 51, no 1, p. 23-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores the large Scandinavian trade in cheap and colorful Chinese silk textiles between 1731 and 1761. Most pieces brought from Canton (Guangzhou) to Denmark and Sweden were monochrome, with discreet designs and patterns. What stood out was the wide color assortment, shades named with a nomenclature shared by the European East India companies. Changing quantities of different shades of red and blue silks reveal shifting Scandinavian consumer demands. The lack of new colors in the assortment of cheap and cheerful Chinese silks suggests, however, that Canton only played a limited role as a fashion leader.

  • 3.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Circulating Knowledge on Nature: Travelers and Informants and the Changing Geography of Linnaean Natural History2017In: Travel, Agency, and the Circulation of Knowledge / [ed] Gesa Mackenthun, Andrea Nicolas and Stephanie Wodianka, Münster: Waxmann Verlag, 2017, p. 75-97Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 4.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Linnaean Scholars Out of Doors: So Much to Name, Learn and Profit From2018In: Naturalists in the Field: Collecting, Recording and Preserving the Natural World from the Fifteenth to the Twenty-First Century / [ed] Arthur MacGregor, Leiden: Brill Academic Publishers, 2018, 1, p. 240-257Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The multifunctional role of fieldwork in Sweden in the eighteenth century is here elaborated upon. Linnaeus’s methods for teaching outdoors in the early modern period are explored, as also are the significant overlaps between using the field for the purposes of education and for exploration. Alternative, extra-scientific motives for studying nature outdoors are also discussed, including the social implication of fieldwork, the formation of a scholarly community and the enhancement of careers, as well the connection between politics, economy and the outdoors in eighteenth-century Sweden and elsewhere.

  • 5.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Linneansk naturalhistoria på marknaden: Materialitet, handel och förändring2017In: Svenska Linnésällskapets årsskrift, ISSN 0375-2038, p. 7-44Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Linnaean Natural History on the Market: Materiality, Trade and Change

    This article discusses the market for natural history collections with a Linnaean provenance in the eighteenth century, as well as the emerging use of binomial names in the trade with natural history specimens. The article begins with assessments of the monetary value of Linnaeus’s conserved plants and animals prior to James Edward Smith’s purchase in 1783 of the collections. This is summarized in Table 1. I argue that Linnaeus’s high estimates of the value of his collections probably reflect the booming market for natural history specimens in mid-eighteenth-century Sweden. The Swedish interest in natural history is also evident in the high prices paid by prominent Swedes in Amsterdam for natural history specimens in the middle third of the eighteenth century. Linnaeus appears to have been unaware of the downward price trends and less buoyant Swedish market that can be detected after the 1750s when he priced his specimens, dividing his material, scholarly heritage between his children. The high price paid for Linnaeus’s collections, once they were sold to Smith in 1783, however, reflects the rise of London as a center of commerce for natural history in late eighteenth-century Europe.

    The following section focuses on the material dimension, foregrounding preservation, presentation and fashion, including how, in late eighteenth-century London, evaluations of the specimen collections Linnaeus used in his taxonomic work changed, reflecting Linnaeus’s shifting status within the history of natural history. A focus on the material dimension reveals that different materials were more or less costly, corresponding to their fragility and perceived beauty. The material dimension reveals the extent to which Linnaeus’s taxonomy concurred with mid-eighteenth century fashions in interior design. But his structures could also operate outside of those aesthetic ideals. While the Linnaean order was replicated and diff used across royal and elite collections, as well as in more humble environments, it became outdated scientifically by the end of the eighteenth century. Meanwhile a growing awareness of the historical dimension of the recent developments of natural history evolved. London, the new home of the Linnaean collection and other collections with a Linnaean provenance, offered a place where Linnaeus’s collections could shift from being modern to becoming historically important, within a relatively short time span, thereby saving them from the ravages of time, in the form of moths, dust, and other destructive forces of nature. Revolutions and wars on the Continent, and a growing Empire, enhanced London’s position as the staple market for natural history as the nineteenth century evolved.

    The market and the use of binary names when selling natural history specimens at auctions in eighteenth-century Europe, particularly in Sweden and England, is also explored. Late eighteenth-century commercial practices surrounding natural history, particularly the use of auctions, reveal how Linnaeus’s new nomenclature became a tool for selling and/or buying natural history. The use of binary names started off as a compromise, mediating between buyers who “loved” order, and those who “loved” variety. But to assign valid scientific names were not cheap as naturalists had to be employed to do it, conferring with already dedicated names and established genera. New names were also not always valid, as naturalists could be prompted by collectors to distinguish and name new species, rather than new varieties, so as to add value to a collection. This of course brings us back to the centrality of collections stretching far back in time, for determining the identity of species and genera. All in all, the development outlined above suggests that the relocation and conservation of the Linnaean collections, as well as the broadening use of Linnaean nomenclature, is embedded in a history of trade, materiality and consumption.

  • 6.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Local, Universal, and Embodied Knowledge: Anglo-Swedish Contacts and Linnaean Natural History2016In: Global scientific practice in an age of revolutions, 1750-1850 / [ed] Patrick Manning & Daniel Rood, Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2016, 1, p. 90-104Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Norbert Götz. “The Good Plumpuddings’ Belief: British Voluntary Aid to Sweden during the Napoleonic Wars.”  The International History Review 37:3 (June 2015): 519-5392016In: H-Diplo Article Reviews, no 612, p. 1-3Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Review of Empire of Tea: The Asian Leaf that Conquered the World. By Markman Ellis,Richard Coulton, and Matthew Mauger. (London, United Kingdom: ReactionBooks, 2015. Pp. 250. $45.00.)2017In: The historian, ISSN 0018-2370, E-ISSN 1540-6563, Vol. 79, no 4, p. 923-925Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Selling nature with binomial names in late 18th and early 19th century – Linnaean nomenclature in Swedish and British auction catalogues2018Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    My paper will discuss the use of binomial names in the trade with natural history specimen in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Natural history specimen were typically sold at auctions. The preference for auctions is generally strong among sellers of perishable goods (e.g. fruit), or goods which are hard do price. Art objects but also natural history belong to the latter category, selling prices can typically fluctuate reflecting rapidly changing interests among buyers.

    Linnaeus’s new nomenclature, introduced to an international audience in Species plantarum, published 1753, soon became accepted across Europe. It replaced the longer and instable diagnostic names, providing a short and easy to remember nomenclature for all living things to a growing audience of naturalists. In my paper I will explore how the new nomenclature made its way into the trade with natural history specimen and collections; foremost how it was used listing and grouping specimen in auction catalogues. The paper will draw on examples of Swedish and British catalogues printed in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, including the catalogue listing the belongings of the Duchess of Portland, put up for sale in 1785. The Duchess owned one of the largest collections of shells in Europe. Shells had long been hot collectors’ item, shell traders were also, as Peter Dance put it, among “the tardiest converts” to Linnaeus’s new names. The catalogue listing the Duchess’s collection also illuminate the tension between different consumers of natural history, between those who ‘loved order’ and those who ‘loved variety’.

  • 10.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History. Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, Stockholm.
    Silk and tea in the North : Scandinavian trade and the market for Asian goods in eighteenth-century Europe2016 (ed. 1)Book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    The price of Linnaean natural history: materiality, commerce and change2018In: Linnaeus, natural history and the circulation of knowledge / [ed] Hanna Hodacs, Kenneth Nyberg, and Stéphane Van Damme, Oxford: Voltaire Foundation, 2018, 1, p. 81-111Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Focusing on trade, materiality and consumer culture, this chapter explores the trade in collections with a Linnaean provenance. An assessment of the value in money of Linnaeus’s conserved plants and animals is mapped in the first section of this paper. The second section focuses on the material dimension, foremost on aspects of preservation,presentation and fashion. The third part of the chapter discusses how, in late eighteenth-century London, evaluations of specimen collections Linnaeus had used in his taxonomic work changed, and how it reflected Linnaeus’s shifting status in the history of natural history. The final section explores the market and the use of binary names when selling natural history specimens at auctions in eighteenth-century Europe, particularly in Sweden and England.

  • 12.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Mathias, Persson
    Uppsala university.
    Globalizing the savage: From stadial theory to a theory of luxury in late-18th-century Swedish discussions of Africa2019In: History of the Human Sciences, ISSN 0952-6951, E-ISSN 1461-720X, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines the effects of globalization on changing notions of the ‘savage’. We compare discussions taking place in different contexts in the late 18th century concerning two Swedish scholars and travellers to Africa: Anders Sparrman (1748–1820), a naturalist and Linnaean disciple, and Carl Bernhard Wadstro¨m (1746–99), an engineer and economist. Both moved in Swedish Swedenborgian circles, and both became involved in the British abolitionist movement. Nevertheless, their images of African ‘Others’ diverged in crucial respects, reflecting differences in their ideological outlooks, institutional affiliations, and understandings of how the world was changing. More specifically, we argue that the perception of global change brought about by a new economic framework of production and consumption provides a key for reading and comparing Wadstro¨m’s and Sparrman’s texts. Comparing their divergent uses of ‘savagery’, the article also highlights the versatility of the savage as a tool for presenting distant parts of the world to a domestic audience.

  • 13.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Nyberg, Kenneth
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Van Damme, Stéphane
    Introduction: de-centring and re-centring Linnaeus2018In: Linnaeus, natural history and the circulation of knowledge / [ed] Hanna Hodacs, Kenneth Nyberg and Stéphane Van Damme, Oxford: Voltaire Foundation, 2018, p. 1-24Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 14.
    Hodacs, Hanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, History.
    Nyberg, KennethGöteborgs universitet.Van Damme, Stéphane
    Linnaeus, natural history and the circulation of knowledge2018Collection (editor) (Refereed)
1 - 14 of 14
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