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  • 1.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Between Online Building and Branding the Nation: Citizens Debating the New Patriotism in Poland2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Between Sunday's best identity and Monday morning reality: On Religion and National Identity in Poland2007Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Sociology.
    Coping in the culture of connectivity: How older adults make sense of living with digital ageism2023In: Digital Ageism: How it Operates and Approaches to Tackling it / [ed] Andrea Rosales, Mireia Fernández-Ardèvol, Jakob Svensson, Taylor & Francis Group, 2023, p. 192-209Chapter in book (Refereed)
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  • 4.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Critically about ourselves. Appropriation of hip hop music in Poland: Analysis of selected hip hop lyrics2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Cultural National Intimacy in the Cyberspace: The case of the Polish online discourse on patriotism2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Digital Mourning Labor:: Corporate Use of Dead Celebrities on Social Media2019In: Death Matters: Cultural Sociology of Mortal Life / [ed] Tora Holmberg, Annika Jonsson, Fredrik Palm, Palgrave Macmillan , 2019, 1, p. 177-197Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Sociology.
    Facing challenges: debate and research on old age and digitalization in Sweden2023In: Medien & Altern. Zeitschrift für Forschung und Praxis, ISSN 2195-3341, Vol. 21, p. 59-65Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Here comes the Rest: A sociological perspective on postcolonial rethinking of the 'Second World'-the case of Poland'2009In: Postcolonial Europe, ISSN 2000-5377Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Love with borders: on patriotism, intimacy and cybersalons. The case of postsocialist Poland2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Nation for Sale? Citizen Online Debates and the ‘New Patriotism’ in Post-Socialist Poland2015In: Commercial Nationalism. Selling the Nation and Nationalizing the Sell / [ed] Volcic, Z., Andrejevic, M., Palgrave Macmillan , 2015, p. 106-130Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Nation in Market Times: Connecting the National and the Commercial. A Research Overview2014In: Sociology Compass, E-ISSN 1751-9020, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 603-613Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides an overview of the growing body of research pertaining to different forms of medi- ated nationhood. In particular, it focuses on the relatively recent trend toward increasing articulations of national identity with the language of consumerism and neoliberal market ideology. It argues that the process is twofold; on the one hand commercial entities employ nationalist appeals in order to sell their commodities, a process which is called “nationalizing the commercial”. On the other hand, nation states make advantage of advertising agencies to create attractive and competitive nation brands which is a pro- cess of “commercializing the national”. The article argues that this double logic is a result of the growing importance of the economic power in societies which can be named as "economization of the social". In the context where the political articulations of nationhood are subsumed by the commercial ones, the link between the national and the commercial is seldom challenged or questioned. 

  • 12.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Re-Branding A Nation Online: Discourses on Polish Nationalism and Patriotism2012Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this dissertation is two-fold. First, the discussion seeks to understand the concepts of nationalism and patriotism and how they relate to one another. In respect to the more critical literature concerning nationalism, it asks whether these two concepts are as different as is sometimes assumed. Furthermore, by problematizing nation-branding as an “updated” form of nationalism, it seeks to understand whether we are facing the possible emergence of a new type of nationalism. Second, the study endeavors to discursively analyze the ”bottom-up” processes of national reproduction and re-definition in an online, post-socialist context through an empirical examination of the online debate and polemic about the new Polish patriotism.

    The dissertation argues that approaching nationalism as a broad phenomenon and ideology which operates discursively is helpful for understanding patriotism as an element of the nationalist rhetoric that can be employed to study national unity, sameness, and difference. Emphasizing patriotism within the Central European context as neither an alternative to nor as a type of nationalism may make it possible to explain the popularity and continuous endurance of nationalism and of practices of national identification in different and changing contexts. Instead of facing a new type of nationalism, we can then speak of new forms of engagement which take place in cyberspace that contribute to the process of reproduction of nationalism. The growing field of nation-branding, with both its practical and political implications, is presented as one of the ways in which nationalism is reproduced and maintained as a form of “soft” rather than “hard” power within the global context. The concept of nation re-branding is introduced in order to account for the role that citizens play in the process of nation branding, which has often been neglected in the literature. This concept is utilized to critically examine, understand, and explain the dynamics of nation brand construction and re-definition, with a particular focus on the discursive practices of citizens in cyberspace. It is argued that citizens in the post-socialist countries, including Poland, can engage in the process of nation re-branding online. It is also argued that this process of online nation re-branding may legitimately be regarded as a type of civic practice through which citizens connect with each other and reproduce a form of cultural national intimacy.

    The results of the analysis of the online empirical material illustrate that nation re-branding is a complex, dynamic, and ambivalent phenomenon. It involves a process of discursive negotiation of nation and of national identity, but also challenges, dismantles, and transforms the national image as it is communicated both internally and externally. This reveals nation re-branding as an element in the post-socialist transformation from a ”nation” to a ”Western,” ”modern,” and ”normal” country in which dealing with an ”old” nation brand is as equally important as the introduction of the new brand. Nationalism does not disappear in the digital age, but rather becomes part of the new way of doing politics online, whereby citizens are potentially granted a form of agency in the democratic process.

     

     

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  • 13.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Rejecting digital technology in the age of cool capitalism2016Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Review of Collective traumas: Memories of War and Conflict in 20th-century Europe (2007) by Mithander, C., Sundholm, J., Holmgren Troy, M. (eds.)2009In: International Sociology, ISSN 0268-5809, E-ISSN 1461-7242, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 707-710Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Review of ”Media Nations. Communicating Belonging and Exclusion in the Modern World” by S. Mihelj (2011)2012In: International Journal of Media and Cultural Politics, ISSN 1740-8296, E-ISSN 2040-0918, Vol. 8, no 2-3, p. 348-350Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Review of Streets of Crocodiles: Photography, Media, and Postsocialist Landscapes in Poland (2010) by Katarzyna Marciniak and Kamil Turowski2011In: European Journal of Communication, ISSN 0267-3231, E-ISSN 1460-3705, Vol. 26, p. 384-387Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Review of: "The New Ecology of Media: Between Convergence and Metamorphosis" by K. Jakubowicz (2011)2013In: European Journal of Communication, ISSN 0267-3231, E-ISSN 1460-3705, Vol. 28, no 4, p. 470-472Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Seks w czasach zarazy: Wpływ AIDS na współczesną świadomość seksualną2008In: Kultura Popularna, Vol. 3, no 21, p. 99-106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Slow Side of the Divide?Older ICT Non- and Seldom-Users Discussing Social Acceleration and Social Change2019In: Digital Culture & Society, ISSN 2364-2114, E-ISSN 2364-2122, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 85-104, article id https://doi.org/10.14361/dcs-2019-0106Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Some say it’s for the lazy ones’: establishing a systematic approach to study Internet forums2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet.
    “The power to switch off: media refusal and disconnection in the networked society”2017Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sociology.
    The waves that sweep away: older Internet non- and seldom-users’ experiences of new technologies and digitalization2020In: Making Time for Digital Lives: Beyond Chronotopia / [ed] Anne Kaun, Christine Lohmeier & Christian Pentzold, London: Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2020, p. 43-62Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this chapter is to empirically explore, understand, and discuss the digitalization of society as part of the shared and negotiated experience among older non-and seldom-users of networked technologies (ICT). More specifically, it focuses on how older people reflect upon social change brought by the so-called waves of mediatization, with a particular focus on digitalization (Couldry and Hepp, 2017). Digitalization is understood here as the third wave of mediatization that relates to the computer, internet, and mobile phone. Of particular interest here is the internet, namely the contemporary infrastructure that links media devices with computers and large data centers. It is also an infrastructure that has undergone rather fast transformation from a “closed, publicly funded and publicly oriented network for specialist communication into a deeply commercialized, increasingly banal space for the conduct of social life itself”(Couldry and Hepp, 2017, 50, emphasis in the original). Mediation and the communicative organization of time are usually approached in terms of clocks, calendars, and timetables. However, being an older person is a specific position in the life course, which allows people to reflect back upon the social change prompted by technological development. It also offers a perspective on the lived experience of different waves of mediatization, including digitalization. This chapter departs from the idea that there is not one universal and straightforward experience of time, speed, and technology but rather assumes multiple temporal landscapes, which come into play in different contexts and situations.

  • 23.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    What the critical approach can bring to the study of the everyday ICTs usage by a potentially vulnerable group?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    'When the rest is going West': The perceptions of the West and reasons for (not) returning home as articulated by participants of Internet discussion forum.2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Sociology.
    Why Disconnecting Matters? Towards a Critical Research Agenda on Online Disconnection2021In: Reckoning with Social Media / [ed] Aleena Chia, Ana Jorge and Tero Karppi, Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2021, 1, p. 13-37Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Why thinking critically about online disconnection matters2018Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 27.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Young, Polish and Proud: Discourse of the New Patriotism in Poland2010In: presentation in session: ‘Alienated Youth and the 21st Century’, ISA World Congress of Sociology XVII Gothenburg, Sweden, July 11-17, 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Lindgren, Simon
    Umea Univ, Dept Sociol, Umea, Sweden.
    Beyond the nation-state Polish national identity and cultural intimacy online2017In: National Identities, ISSN 1460-8944, E-ISSN 1469-9907, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 293-309Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Sociology.
    Manchester, Helen
    University of Bristol.
    Ageing with digital technologies: From theory to agency and practice2022In: International Journal of Ageing and Later Life, E-ISSN 1652-8670, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 9-21Article in journal (Other academic)
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  • 30.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Saxonberg, Steven
    Uppsala universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Globalisation or Glocalisation?: A Comparison of Advertising in Poland and Sweden2005In: Nationalism Across the Globe: An Overview of Nationalisms in State-Endowed and Stateless Nations / [ed] Sebastian Wojciechowski, Wojciech J. Burszta & Tomasz Kamusella, Poznan: Wyższa Szkoła Nauk Humanistycznych i Dziennikarstwa , 2005Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Saxonberg, Steven
    Uppsala universitet, Statsvetenskapliga institutionen.
    Markers of Polish and Swedish Identity in Newspaper and Magazine Advertisements2004In: Panstwo i spoleczenstwo w XXI wieku: Style myślenia politycznego Polaków na progu XXI stulecia. Akcenty retro- i prospektywne / [ed] Stanisława Kiliana, Krakow: Krakowska Szkoła Wyższa im. Andrzeja Frycza Modrzewskiego , 2004, p. 231-247Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala Universitet.
    Surowiec, Pawel
    Branding Poland online: propagating and resisting nation branding on Facebook2017In: Social Media and Politics in Central and Eastern Europe / [ed] Paweł Surowiec, Václav Štětka, Routledge , 2017Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Ideology, power and inclusion: using the critical perspective to study how older ICT users make sense of digitisation2018In: Media Culture and Society, ISSN 0163-4437, E-ISSN 1460-3675, Vol. 40, no 8, p. 1167-1185Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Critical Internet and media scholarship has primarily focused on contributing to theoretical debates within the field of media and communications but few empirical studies have applied this theoretical approach. This article uses data on older active ICT users’ understandings of digitisation. It draws inspiration from Boltanski’s pragmatist sociology of critique and the notion that people’s own take on their situation are fruitful sources of information in the quest for emancipation. It employs the notions of ideology, power and inclusion – which are central to critical scholarship – to make sense of older active ICT users’ understandings of digitisation. In doing so, it explores the fruitfulness of the critical lens for studies of ICT users while bringing attention to older active ICT users’ critical capacities.

  • 34.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Keeping up with society: a critical perspective on older active users' understandings and engagement with ICTs2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Welfare and Lifecourse.
    Keeping up with the information society: how active older users negotiate inclusion and participation2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper builds on an on-going project that aims to contribute to the scholarly debates on the “digital divide” and “digital inclusion” by bringing to fore the complexities of older people’s understandings and usage of digital technologies.  Older people are often considered one of the vulnerable groups and are among the key targets of the digital inclusion policies, which tend to focus on user-centered solutions on the micro-level. The critical approach employed in this paper allows reconsidering the normative, inclusionary, micro-level foundations of digital inclusion discourses that often inform the policy. The paper builds on the analysis of focus group interviews with 30 older adults (65+) who are active internet users in Sweden, the country often considered as one of the leading IT nations worldwide. We analyze how active older users construct, reproduce and negotiate ideological notions of participation, inclusion and their privileged position of (active) users as imperatives and prerequisites of “keeping up with the (information) society”. Additionally, the analysis suggests that discourses on digital inclusion need to acknowledge the divide that older people themselves create as they discursively position themselves against non-users when describing when, how and why they engage with digital technologies.

  • 36.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Keeping up with the information society: how active older users negotiate inclusion and participation2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Older active users of ICTs make sense of their engagement2017In: Seminar.net: Media, technology and lifelong learning, E-ISSN 1504-4831, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on older people’s ICT usage tends to focus on either the ways in which they go about learning to use these technologies or the impact that ICTs have on their lives. This research seems, in other words, to take for granted that older people are ‘digital immigrants’ as the digital divide debate proposed. Research that specifically looks at the ways in which older ICT users make sense of their engagement with these technologies is still limited. This article explores therefore – through focus group interviews – how a group of older people who are active ICT users make sense of their ‘digital nativeness’. The analysis shows that the interviewees are well aware that their ICT proficiency differentiated them from their peers, which is why they make sense of their ICT usage by making reference to the issues that make them ‘exceptional’ older people. These include the fact that they have used computers for many years and therefore made ICT usage an everyday habit early on; the fact that most older people do not have the skills that they themselves have, which is why they feel the need to share them with others; and the fact that their lifelong experience means they can use these technologies in judicious ways. By bringing attention to how older active ICT users make sense of their engagement, this article contributes to the notion of the digital spectrum and the debate on the inequalities that ICT proficiency brings about.

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  • 38.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Older active users’ understandings of digitization:: what the critical lens can offer2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Older People, New Media: The Motivations for and Experiences of Older Adults2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Older people, new media: the motivations for and experiences of older adults’ usage of digital media2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 41.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Revisiting the digital divide: contributions from older internet users2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 42.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    “Revisiting the digital divide: contributions from older internet users”2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 43.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    The Divide That Older People Make: Age, Digital Technologies And Meaning Among Older Internet Users2014In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 54, no S2, p. 116-116Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    The divide that older people make: age, digital technologies and meaning among older internet users2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    The divide that older people make: age, digital technologies and meaning among older internet users2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper builds on an on-going project that aims to contribute to the scholarly debate on the “digital divide” by bringing to fore the complexities of older people’s understandings and usage of digital technologies.  Most scholarly debates on age and digital technologies, both within social gerontology and media and communication studies and within social gerontology, depart from the idea that the “digital divide” pertains mostly to the lack of access and/or skills to use the internet. From this point of view, older people are described not only as a particularly vulnerable group but also as a homogeneous group prone to exclusion. As such, they are believed to be at risk of ending up on the “disconnected” side of the divide.  Although research into older people’s Internet usage patterns is rapidly growing, their understandings of digital technologies, particularly in relation to how these are informed by their understandings of aging and old age, remain unexplored. 

    This paper is based on the analysis of focus group interviews with 30 older adults (65+) who are active Internet users. In this presentation we focus on the relationship between patterns of the everyday Internet usage and how this usage relates to the informants’ understandings of aging and old age. The analysis suggests that the debate on the digital divide fails to address the divide that older people themselves create as they discursively position themselves against non-users when describing when, how and why they engage with digital technologies.

     

  • 46.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Torres, Sandra
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    The Divide Within: Older Active ICT Users Position Themselves Against Different 'Others'2015In: Journal of Aging Studies, ISSN 0890-4065, E-ISSN 1879-193X, Vol. 35, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although research into older people's internet usage patterns is rapidly growing, their understandings of digital technologies, particularly in relation to how these are informed by their understandings of aging and old age, remain unexplored. This is the case because research on older active ICT users tends to regard old age as an empirically interesting part of the life-course as opposed to a theoretically profuse source of information about why and how older people engage with digital technologies. This article explores - through focus group interviews with 30 older adults (aged 66-89) - the ways in which the social position of old age is used by older active ICT users in order to make sense of how and why they engage with these technologies. In this article, positioning theory is used to shed light on how the older people interviewed positioned themselves as 'active older users' in the interviews. The analysis brings to the fore the divide that older people themselves create as they discursively position themselves against different types of ICT users and non-users (young and old) when describing how and why they engage with digital technologies.

  • 47.
    Surowiec, Pawel
    et al.
    University of Sheffield.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Dalarna University, School of Culture and Society, Sociology.
    Poland: why is a new media law prompting street protests and outrage from the US?2021Other (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Surowiec, Pawel
    et al.
    Department of Journalism Studies, University of Sheffield.
    Kania Lundholm, Magdalena
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Winiarska-Brodowska, Malgorzata
    Institute of Journalism, Media and Social Communication, Jagiellonian university, Cracow.
    Towards illiberal conditioning? New politics of media regulations in Poland (2015–2018)2019In: East European Politics, ISSN 2159-9165, E-ISSN 2159-9173, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 27-43Article in journal (Refereed)
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