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  • 1.
    Borg, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science.
    Commentary on selection of assistive technology in a context with limited resources2019In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Borg, Johan
    Lund universitet.
    The Participation Pyramid: a response to "Reconsideration ICF scheme" by Heerkens et al. 20172018In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 123-124Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Bergman, Anna-Karin
    Ostergren, Per-Olof
    Is ‘legal empowerment of the poor’ relevant to people with disabilities in developing countries?: An empirical and normative review2013In: Global Health Action, ISSN 1654-9716, E-ISSN 1654-9880, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Legal empowerment of the poor is highly relevant to public health as it aims to relieve income poverty, a main determinant of health. The Commission on Legal Empowerment of the Poor (CLEP) has proposed legal empowerment measures in the following four domains: access to justice and the rule of law, property, labor, and business rights. Despite being overrepresented among the poor, CLEP has not explicitly considered the situation of people with disabilities. Objectives: To examine the empirical evidence for the relevance of the CLEP legal empowerment measures to people with disabilities in low-and lower middle-income countries, and to evaluate the extent to which the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) addresses those measures. Methods: Critical literature review of empirical studies and a checklist assessment of the CRPD. Results: Fourteen included articles confirm that people with disabilities experience problems in the domains of access to justice and the rule of law, labor rights, and business rights. No texts on property rights were found. Evidence for the effectiveness of the proposed measures is insufficient. Overall, the CRPD fully or partially supports two-thirds of the proposed measures (seven out of nine measures for access to justice and the rule of law, none of the five measures for property rights, all seven measures for labor rights, and six out of nine measures for business rights). Conclusions: Although most of the domains of the CLEP legal empowerment measures are relevant to people with disabilities from both empirical and normative perspectives, it is uncertain whether the devised measures are of immediate relevance to them. Further research is warranted in this regard.

  • 4.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Ekman, Björn Olof
    Östergren, Per-Olof
    Is centre-based provision of hearing aids better than community-based provision?: A cluster-randomized trial among adolescents in Bangladesh2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 497-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: In response to the need for hearing aids in low-income countries, an approach to provide hearing aids through trained community workers was developed. This study compares the effectiveness of the community-based approach with that of a centre-based approach. Methods: One hundred and forty adolescents (56% girls; 12-18 years; mean: 15 years) from eleven sub-districts participated in a cluster-randomized trial comparing a community-based service (n = 75) with a centre-based service (n = 65) in Bangladesh. The International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA) was administered to the participants six weeks after fitting of a hearing aid, and its scores were analyzed by Mann-Whitney U-tests and an ordinal regression model. Results: The community-based approach performed as well as the centre-based approach on five out of seven outcome measures. The latter approach performed statistically significantly better on Residual participation restrictions (p = .007) and Impact on others (p = .012), but the effect sizes were small. Controlling for sex, age, hearing loss, place of living and proxy responses did not change the results. Conclusions: The community-based approach is a viable and effective option for hearing aid delivery in low-resourced settings. The approach needs to be adapted to particular contexts, and possible down-sides may need to be counteracted by special interventions.

  • 5.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    KTH.
    Lantz, Ann
    KTH.
    Gulliksen, Jan
    KTH.
    Accessibility to electronic communication for people with cognitive disabilities: a systematic search and review of empirical evidence2015In: Universal Access in the Information Society, ISSN 1615-5289, E-ISSN 1615-5297, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 547-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to identify and synthesize measures for accessibility to electronic communication for people with cognitive disabilities by seeking answers to the following research questions: What measures to make electronic communication accessible to people with cognitive disabilities are evaluated and reported in the scientific literature? What documented effects do these measures have? Empirical studies describing and assessing cognitive accessibility measures were identified by searches of 13 databases. Data were extracted and methodological quality was assessed. Findings were analyzed and recommendations for practice and research were made. Twenty-nine articles with considerable variations in studied accessibility measures, diagnoses, methods, outcome measures, and quality were included. They address the use of Internet, e-mail, telephone, chat, television, multimedia interfaces, texts and pictures, operation of equipment, and entering of information. Although thin, the current evidence base indicates that the accessibility needs, requirements, and preferences of people with cognitive disabilities are diverse. This ought to be reflected in accessibility guidelines and standards. Studies to systematically develop and recommend effective accessibility measures are needed to address current knowledge gaps.

  • 6.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Larsson, Stig
    Assistive devices for people affected by leprosy: Underutilised facilitators of functioning?2009In: Leprosy Review, ISSN 0305-7518, E-ISSN 2162-8807, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 13-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives People affected by leprosy and their families face social and economic problems. The focus of interventions is often on prevention of disabilities and socioeconomic rehabilitation. The objective of this study was to explore to what extent the potential of assistive devices to facilitate activities and participation of people affected by leprosy has been utilised. Design Published literature was reviewed and the findings analysed. Results Considerable attention has been given to the protecting role of assistive devices. The focus of assistive devices facilitating functioning has been on mobility aspects of self-care and domestic life. Conclusions The findings indicate that the potential of assistive devices to facilitate activities and participation in life areas such as work and employment is still waiting to be utilised on a broad scale.

  • 7.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Larsson, Stig
    Ostergren, Per-Olof
    The right to assistive technology: for whom, for what, and by whom?2011In: Disability & Society, ISSN 0968-7599, E-ISSN 1360-0508, Vol. 26, no 2, p. 151-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite its facilitating role in creating opportunities for people with disabilities to exercise human rights, access to assistive technology is limited in many countries. It is therefore promising that the Convention on Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) addresses this area. The purpose of this study was to analyse the assistive technology content of the CRPD from a basic human rights perspective in order to clarify its limitations and opportunities for formulation of policies and implementation strategies. Data were collected through a content analysis of the CRPD. It is concluded that a non-discriminatory interpretation of the provisions entitles all people with disabilities to a right to demand available and affordable assistive technology. Ensuring this right is a national as well as an international responsibility.

  • 8.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Larsson, Stig
    Ostergren, Per-Olof
    Eide, Arne H.
    The Friction Model - a dynamic model of functioning, disability and contextual factors and its conceptual and practical applicability2010In: Disability and Rehabilitation, ISSN 0963-8288, E-ISSN 1464-5165, Vol. 32, no 21, p. 1790-1797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose. To develop a model of the dynamics of functioning, disability and contextual factors which harmonises with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF). Method. Model parts based on ICF were identified and a model drawing from engineering concepts was developed. The conceptual and practical applicability of the model was discussed. Results. The so called Friction Model was created, which incorporates the ICF entities capacity, performance, environmental factors, health condition, body functions and structures, and personal factors. Friction describes the interaction between a person and his or her environment. The coefficient of friction is defined as the ratio between capacity and performance. Conclusion. Carrying conceptual strengths and limitations, the Friction Model appears to offer opportunities for practical applications, including ICF-based alternatives to health-economic analyses. Harmonising with the ICF model and terminology, the model uses friction to describe the interaction between a person and the environment. The coefficient of friction can be used as a simple measure of how facilitating an environment is. The applicability is not limited to functioning of people with impairments.

  • 9.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Larsson, Stig
    Ostergren, Per-Olof
    Rahman, A. S. M. Atiqur
    Bari, Nazmul
    Khan, A. H. M. Noman
    Assistive technology use and human rights enjoyment: a cross-sectional study in Bangladesh2012In: BMC International Health and Human Rights, ISSN 1472-698X, E-ISSN 1472-698X, Vol. 12, article id 18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: About half a billion people with disabilities in developing countries have limited access to assistive technology. The Convention on the Rights of persons with Disabilities requires governments to take measures to ensure provision of such technologies. To guide implementation of these measures there is a need for understanding health outcomes from a human rights perspective. The objective of this study was therefore to explore the relation between assistive technology use and enjoyment of human rights in a low-income country. Methods: Data was collected in eight districts of Bangladesh through interviews of people with hearing impairments using and not using hearings aids, and people with ambulatory impairments using and not using manual wheelchairs (N = 583). Using logistic regression, self-reported outcomes on standard of living, health, education, work, receiving information and movement were analyzed. Results: The adjusted likelihood of reporting greater enjoyment of human rights was significantly higher among people using hearing aids compared to non-users for all outcomes except working status. Compared to non-users, users of wheelchairs reported a significantly higher adjusted likelihood of good ambulatory performance and a significantly lower adjusted likelihood of reporting a positive working status. Further analyses indicated that physical accessibility to working places and duration of wheelchair use had a statistically significant impact on the likelihood of reporting positive work outcomes. Conclusions: The findings support the notion that assistive technology use increases the likelihood of human rights enjoyment, particularly hearing aid use. Physical accessibility should always be addressed in wheelchair provision.

  • 10.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Larsson, Stig
    Östergren, Per-Olof
    Rahman, A. S. M. Atiqur
    Bari, Nazmul
    Khan, A. H. M. Noman
    User involvement in service delivery predicts outcomes of assistive technology use: A cross-sectional study in Bangladesh2012In: BMC Health Services Research, ISSN 1472-6963, E-ISSN 1472-6963, Vol. 12, article id 330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge about the relation between user involvement in the provision of assistive technology and outcomes of assistive technology use is a prerequisite for the development of efficient service delivery strategies. However, current knowledge is limited, particularly from low-income countries where affordability is an issue. The objective was therefore to explore the relation between outcomes of assistive technology use and user involvement in the service delivery process in Bangladesh. Methods: Using structured interviews, data from 136 users of hearing aids and 149 users of manual wheelchairs were collected. Outcomes were measured using the International Outcome Inventory for Hearing Aids (IOI-HA), which was adapted for wheelchair users. Predictors of user involvement included preference, measurement and training. Results: Users reported outcomes comparable to those found in other high- and low-income countries. User involvement increased the likelihood for reporting better outcomes except for measurement among hearing aid users. Conclusions: The findings support the provision of assistive technology as a strategy to improve the participation of people with disabilities in society. They also support current policies and guidelines for user-involvement in the service delivery process. Simplified strategies for provision of hearing aids may be explored.

  • 11.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Lindstroem, Anna
    Larsson, Stig
    Assistive technology in developing countries: national and international responsibilities to implement the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities2009In: The Lancet, ISSN 0140-6736, E-ISSN 1474-547X, Vol. 374, no 9704, p. 1863-1865Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Lindstrom, Anna
    Larsson, Stig
    Assistive technology in developing countries: a review from the perspective of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities2011In: Prosthetics and orthotics international, ISSN 0309-3646, E-ISSN 1746-1553, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 20-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The ‘Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities’ (CRPD) requires governments to meet the assistive technology needs of citizens. However, the access to assistive technology in developing countries is severely limited, which is aggravated by a lack of related services. Objectives: To summarize current knowledge on assistive technology for low- and lower-middle-income countries published in 1995 or later, and to provide recommendations that facilitate implementation of the CRPD. Study design: Literature review. Methods: Literature was searched in web-based databases and reference lists. Studies carried out in low- and lower-middle-income countries, or addressing assistive technology for such countries, were included. Results: The 52 included articles are dominated by product oriented research on leg prostheses and manual wheelchairs. Less has been published on hearing aids and virtually nothing on the broad range of other types of assistive technology. Conclusions: To support effective implementation of the CRPD in these countries, there is a need for actions and research related particularly to policies, service delivery, outcomes and international cooperation, but also to product development and production.

  • 13.
    Borg, Johan
    et al.
    Lunds universitet.
    Ostergren, Per-Olof
    Users’ perspectives on the provision of assistive technologies in Bangladesh: awareness, providers, costs and barriers2015In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 301-308Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to contribute to a better understanding of challenges and solutions to equitable provision of assistive technologies in resource limited environments by (i) describing sources of awareness, types of providers and costs of assistive technologies; (ii) describing common reasons for not possessing assistive technologies; and (iii) comparing these sources, providers, costs and reasons among younger and older men and women living in urban and rural settings. Methods: Descriptive and analytic statistics were used to analyze crosssectional data from a total sample of 581 hearing aid users, wheelchair users, individuals with hearing impairments not using hearing aids and individuals with ambulatory impairments not using wheelchairs living in eight districts of Bangladesh. Results: Major sources of awareness, types of providers and costs paid varied between users of different types of assistive technology. Lack of affordability was the main reason for not possessing assistive technology. Outcome differences were found between younger and older groups, men and women, and literate and illiterate respondents, while no differences related to place of living were identified. Conclusions: Age, gender, type of impairment and socioeconomic status need to be considered when planning and implementing equitable provision of assistive technologies.

  • 14. Desmond, Deirdre
    et al.
    Layton, Natasha
    Bentley, Jacob
    Boot, Fleur Heleen
    Borg, Johan
    Lunds universitet.
    Dhungana, Bishnu Maya
    Gallagher, Pamela
    Gitlow, Lynn
    Gowran, Rosemary Joan
    Groce, Nora
    Mavrou, Katerina
    Mackeogh, Trish
    McDonald, Rachael
    Pettersson, Cecilia
    Scherer, Marcia J.
    Assistive technology and people: a position paper from the first global research, innovation and education on assistive technology (GREAT) summit2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 437-444Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assistive technology (AT) is a powerful enabler of participation. The World Health Organization’s Global Collaboration on Assistive Technology (GATE) programme is actively working towards access to assistive technology for all. Developed through collaborative work as a part of the Global Research, Innovation and Education on Assistive Technology (GREAT) Summit, this position paper provides a “state of the science” view of AT users, conceptualized as “People” within the set of GATE strategic “P” s. People are at the core of policy, products, personnel and provision. AT is an interface between the person and the life they would like to lead. People’s preferences, perspectives and goals are fundamental to defining and determining the success of AT. Maximizing the impact of AT in enabling participation requires an individualized and holistic understanding of the value and meaning of AT for the individual, taking a universal model perspective, focusing on the person, in context, and then considering the condition and/or the technology. This paper aims to situate and emphasize people at the centre of AT systems: we highlight personal meanings and perspectives on AT use and consider the role of advocacy, empowerment and co-design in developing and driving AT processes.

  • 15. Ekman, Björn
    et al.
    Borg, Johan
    Lunds universitet.
    Provision of hearing aids to children in Bangladesh: costs and cost-effectiveness of a community-based and a centre-based approach2017In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 625-630Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to provide evidence on the costs and health effects of two alternative hearing aid delivery models, a community-based and a centre-based approach. The study is set in Bangladesh and the study population is children between 12 and 18 years old. Methods: Data on resource use by participants and their caregivers were collected by a household survey. Follow-up data were collected after two months. Data on the costs to providers of the two approaches were collected by means of key informant interviews. Results: The total cost per participant in the community-based model was BDT 6,333 (USD 79) compared with BDT 13,718 (USD 172) for the centre-based model. Both delivery models are found to be cost-effective with an estimated cost per DALY averted of BDT 17,611 (USD 220) for the community-based model and BDT 36,775 (USD 460) for the centre-based model. Conclusions: Using a community-based approach to deliver hearing aids to children in a resource constrained environment is a cost-effective alternative to the traditional centre-based approach. Further evidence is needed to draw conclusions for scale-up of approaches; rigorous analysis is possible using well-prepared data collection tools and working closely with sector professionals.

  • 16. Garcon, Loic
    et al.
    Khasnabis, Chapal
    Walker, Lloyd
    Nakatani, Yukiko
    Lapitan, Jostacio
    Borg, Johan
    Lunds universitet.
    Ross, Alex
    Berumen, Adriana Velazquez
    Medical and assistive health technology: Meeting the needs of aging populations2016In: The Gerontologist, ISSN 0016-9013, E-ISSN 1758-5341, Vol. 56, no S2, p. S293-S302Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose of the Study: To identify policy gaps in the delivery and availability of assistive health technology (AHT) and medical devices (MD) for aging populations, particularly in low-and middle-income countries (LMICs). Design and Methods: The findings presented in this paper are the results of several narrative overviews. They provide a contextual analysis of the conclusions and evidence from WHO commissioned research and expert consultations in 2013 and 2014, as well as a synthesis of literature reviews conducted on AHT and MD. Results: Practical, life-enhancing support for older people through AHT, MD, and related health and social services is a neglected issue. This is particularly so in LMICs where the biggest increases in aging populations are occurring, and yet where there is commonly little or no access to these vital components of healthy aging. Implications: Health technologies, especially medical and assistive health technology, are essential to ensure older people’s dignity and autonomy, but their current and potential benefits have received little recognition in LMICs. Viewing these technologies as relevant only to disabled people is an inadequate approach. They should be accessible to both older adults with disabilities and older adults with functional limitation. Many countries need much greater official awareness of older adults’ needs and preferences. Such attitudinal changes should then be reflected in laws and regulations to address the specificities of care for older people.

  • 17. Kamaraj, Deepan C.
    et al.
    Bray, Nathan
    Rispin, Karen
    Kankipati, Padmaja
    Pearlman, Jonathan
    Borg, Johan
    Lunds universitet.
    A conceptual framework to assess effectiveness in wheelchair provision2017In: African Journal of disability, ISSN 2223-9170, Vol. 6, article id a355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Currently, inadequate wheelchair provision has forced many people with disabilities to be trapped in a cycle of poverty and deprivation, limiting their ability to access education, work and social facilities. This issue is in part because of the lack of collaboration among various stakeholders who need to work together to design, manufacture and deliver such assistive mobility devices. This in turn has led to inadequate evidence about intervention effectiveness, disability prevalence and subsequent costeffectiveness that would help facilitate appropriate provision and support for people with disabilities. Objectives: In this paper, we describe a novel conceptual framework that can be tested across the globe to study and evaluate the effectiveness of wheelchair provision. Method: The Comparative Effectiveness Research Subcommittee (CER-SC), consisting of the authors of this article, housed within the Evidence-Based Practice Working Group (EBP-WG) of the International Society of Wheelchair Professionals (ISWP), conducted a scoping review of scientific literature and standard practices used during wheelchair service provision. The literature review was followed by a series of discussion groups. Results: The three iterations of the conceptual framework are described in this manuscript. Conclusion: We believe that adoption of this conceptual framework could have broad applications in wheelchair provision globally to develop evidence-based practices. Such a perspective will help in the comparison of different strategies employed in wheelchair provision and further improve clinical guidelines. Further work is being conducted to test the efficacy of this conceptual framework to evaluate effectiveness of wheelchair service provision in various settings across the globe.

  • 18. MacLachlan, Malcolm
    et al.
    Banes, David
    Bell, Diane
    Borg, Johan
    Lunds universitet.
    Donnelly, Brian
    Fembek, Michael
    Ghosh, Ritu
    Gowran, Rosemary Joan
    Geiser, Priscille
    Hooks, Hilary
    Assistive technology policy: a position paper from the first global research, innovation, and education on assistive technology (GREAT) summit2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 13, no 5, SI, p. 454-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased awareness, interest and use of assistive technology (AT) presents substantial opportunities for many citizens to become, or continue being, meaningful participants in society. However, there is a significant shortfall between the need for and provision of AT, and this is patterned by a range of social, demographic and structural factors. To seize the opportunity that assistive technology offers, regional, national and sub-national assistive technology policies are urgently required. This paper was developed for and through discussion at the Global Research, Innovation and Education on Assistive Technology (GREAT) Summit; organized under the auspices of the World Health Organization’s Global Collaboration on Assistive Technology (GATE) program. It outlines some of the key principles that AT polices should address and recognizes that AT policy should be tailored to the realities of the contexts and resources available. AT policy should be developed as a part of the evolution of related policy across a number of different sectors and should have clear and direct links to AT as mediators and moderators for achieving the Sustainable Development Goals. The consultation process, development and implementation of policy should be fully inclusive of AT users, and their representative organizations, be across the lifespan, and imbued with a strong systems-thinking ethos. Six barriers are identified which funnel and diminish access to AT and are addressed systematically within this paper. We illustrate an example of good practice through a case study of AT services in Norway, and we note the challenges experienced in less well-resourced settings. A number of economic factors relating to AT and economic arguments for promoting AT use are also discussed. To address policy-development the importance of active citizenship and advocacy, the need to find mechanisms to scale up good community practices to a higher level, and the importance of political engagement for the policy process, are highlighted. Policy should be evidence-informed and allowed for evidence-making; however, it is important to account for other factors within the given context in order for policy to be practical, authentic and actionable. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION The development of policy in the area of asssitive technology is important to provide an overarching vision and outline resourcing priorities. This paper identifies some of the key themes that should be addressed when developing or revising assistive technology policy. Each country should establish a National Assistive Technology policy and develop a theory of change for its implementation.

  • 19. Matter, Rebecca
    et al.
    Harniss, Mark
    Oderud, Tone
    Borg, Johan
    Lunds universitet.
    Eide, Arne H.
    Assistive technology in resource-limited environments: a scoping review2017In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 105-114Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: It is estimated that only 5-15% of people in low and middle income countries (LMICs) who need assistive technologies (AT) have access to them. This scoping review was conducted to provide a comprehensive picture of the current evidence base on AT within LMICs and other resource limited environments. Method: The scoping review involved locating evidence, extracting data, and summarizing characteristics of all included research publications. Results: Of the 252 publications included, over 80% focused on types of AT that address mobility (45.2%) and vision (35.5%) needs, with AT types of spectacles and prosthetics comprising over 50% of all publications. Evidence on AT that addresses hearing, communication, and cognition is the most underrepresented within the existing evidence base. The vast majority of study designs are observational (63%). Conclusions: Evidence on AT in resource-limited environments is limited in quantity and quality, and not evenly distributed across types of AT. To advance this field, we recommend using appropriate evidence review approaches that allow for heterogeneous study designs, and developing a common language by creating a typology of AT research focus areas. Funders and researchers must commit much greater resources to the AT field to ameliorate the paucity of evidence available.

  • 20. Smith, Roger O.
    et al.
    Scherer, Marcia J.
    Cooper, Rory
    Bell, Diane
    Hobbs, David A.
    Pettersson, Cecilia
    Seymour, Nicky
    Borg, Johan
    Lunds universitet.
    Bauer, Stephen
    Assistive technology products: a position paper from the first global research, innovation, and education on assistive technology (GREAT) summit2018In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, ISSN 1748-3107, E-ISSN 1748-3115, Vol. 13, no 5, SI, p. 473-485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is based on work from the Global Research, Innovation, and Education on Assistive Technology (GREAT) Summit that was coordinated by WHO’s Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology (GATE). The purpose of this paper is to describe the needs and opportunities embedded in the assistive product life-cycle as well as issues relating to the various stages of assistive product mobilization worldwide. The paper discusses assistive technology product terminology and the dangers of focusing on products outside the context and rolling out products without a plan. Additionally, the paper reviews concepts and issues around technology transfer, particularly in relation to meeting global needs and among countries with limited resources. Several opportunities are highlighted including technology advancement and the world nearing a state of readiness through a developing capacity of nations across the world to successfully adopt and support the assistive technology products and applications. The paper is optimistic about the future of assistive technology products reaching the people that can use it the most and the excitement across large and small nations in increasing their own capacities for implementing assistive technology. This is expressed as hope in future students as they innovate and in modern engineering that will enable assistive technology to pervade all corners of current and potential marketplaces. Importantly, the paper poses numerous topics where discussions are just superficially opened. The hope is that a set of sequels will follow to continue this critical dialog. IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATION Successful assistive technology product interventions are complex and include much more than the simple selection of the right product. Assistive technology product use is highly context sensitive in terms of an individual user’s environment. The development of assistive technology products is tricky as it must be contextually sensitive to the development environment and market as well. As a field we have much to study and develop around assistive technology product interventions from a global perspective.

  • 21. Tebbutt, Emma
    et al.
    Brodmann, Rebecca
    Borg, Johan
    Lunds universitet.
    MacLachlan, Malcolm
    Khasnabis, Chapal
    Horvath, Robert
    Assistive products and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)2016In: Globalization and Health, ISSN 1744-8603, E-ISSN 1744-8603, Vol. 12Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have placed great emphasis on the need for much greater social inclusion, and on making deliberate efforts to reach marginalized groups. People with disabilities are often marginalized through their lack of access to a range of services and opportunities. Assistive products can help people overcome impairments and barriers enabling them to be active, participating and productive members of society. Assistive products are vital for people with disabilities, frailty and chronic illnesses; and for those with mental health problems, and gradual cognitive and physical decline characteristic of aging populations. This paper illustrates how the achievement of each of the 17 SDGs can be facilitated by the use of assistive products. Without promoting the availability of assistive products the SDGs cannot be achieved equitably. We highlight how assistive products can be considered as both a mediator and a moderator of SDG achievement. We also briefly describe how the Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology (GATE) is working to promote greater access to assistive products on a global scale.

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