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  • 1.
    Gummesson, Karl
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Effective measures to decrease air contaminants through risk and control visualization: a study of the effective use of QR codes to facilitate safety training2016In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 82, p. 120-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Woodworking industries still consists of wood dust problems. Young workers are especially vulnerable to safety risks. To reduce risks, it is important to change attitudes and increase knowledge about safety. Safety training have shown to establish positive attitudes towards safety among employees. The aim of current study is to analyze the effect of QR codes that link to Picture Mix EXposure (PIMEX) videos by analyzing attitudes to this safety training method and safety in student responses. Safety training videos were used in upper secondary school handicraft programs to demonstrate wood dust risks and methods to decrease exposure to wood dust. A preliminary study was conducted to investigate improvement of safety training in two schools in preparation for the main study that investigated a safety training method in three schools. In the preliminary study the PIMEX method was first used in which students were filmed while wood dust exposure was measured and subsequently displayed on a computer screen in real time. Before and after the filming, teachers, students, and researchers together analyzed wood dust risks and effective measures to reduce exposure to them. For the main study, QR codes linked to PIMEX videos were attached at wood processing machines. Subsequent interviews showed that this safety training method enables students in an early stage of their life to learn about risks and safety measures to control wood dust exposure. The new combination of methods can create awareness, change attitudes and motivation among students to work more frequently to reduce wood dust. 

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  • 2.
    Gummesson, Karl
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Rosén, Gunnar
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Short-term variation in occupational exposure to air contaminants2015In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, ISSN 1545-9624, E-ISSN 1545-9632, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 294-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many industrial workers are exposed to air contaminants. A significant proportion of this exposure is found to occur as short peaks, a fact that has received limited attention in the literature. The present study focuses on short-term variation in air contaminant exposure measured at the level of seconds, linking exposure peaks to typical work situations in selected Swedish industries. The video exposure monitoring method was used to characterize this variation. Ten different videos were analyzed, from recordings varying in length between 15 and 34 minutes. Cumulative exposure for sampling intervals ranked from high to low, relative to the total exposure was calculated as a function of time. Measures of exposure variation included geometric standard deviation and maximum exposure divided by arithmetic mean. The results show that the characteristics of the variation differ between industrial situations. Samples from the stone, wood, and pharmaceutical industries generated the highest variation, implying that exposure peaks of short duration explain a large proportion of the total exposure. It can be concluded that video monitoring of exposure, combined with calculation of exposure variation as percentage of time accounting for given percentages of exposure, can help to reduce exposure to air contaminants in industrial situations by introducing more targeted control measures.

  • 3.
    Gummesson, Karl
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Rydell, Alexis
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Safety training to reduce wood dust: a work method2015In: Proceedings of USE2015, 2015, p. 285-292Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Air contaminants remain a problem in SMEs (Karlsson et al., 2006). Research has shown that short-term exposure to air contaminants can cause health risks, and short-term exposure has received low attention compared to long-term measured mean values of different air contaminants. Yet peak exposures often explain a large part of the mean exposure. The aim of this paper is to develop a work method that can be used to control wood dust and improve the work environment of SMEs. The work method was developed by earlier research in the field of safety training and occupational health, but also through interviews with regional safety representatives in wood industries. The work method illustrates several steps, such as risk and control identification of short term exposure, safety training (creation and implementation), and evaluation of safety training, collaboration in safety training, adaptation and implementation of safety training. The work method can be used by safety representatives to control wood dust primarily through safety training, but also to create conditions for further studies on risks and safety in SMEs.

  • 4.
    Hedlund, Ann
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Gummesson, Karl
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Rydell, Alexis
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Andersson, Ing-Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Occupational science.
    Safety motivation at work: evaluation of changes from six interventions2016In: Safety Science, ISSN 0925-7535, E-ISSN 1879-1042, Vol. 82, p. 155-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Unsafe work environments can be both unhealthy for employees and costly for organizations. Safety motivation is essential to enhancing safety behaviors among employees. The objective is to evaluate whether six different interventions including safety training increase safety motivation. A validated questionnaire was used at two metal companies, two municipal agencies, one paper mill, and one plastic company. Statistical tests were used to compare the results at the factorial and item levels. In three cases, safety motivation changed significantly at the factorial level. There was a significant difference in each intervention at the item level. The outcomes indicate that the degree of participation, the number of occasions, the primary target group, and the decision maker of the intervention affect safety motivation.

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