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  • 1. Erdner, A.
    et al.
    Magnusson, A
    Andersson, L
    Lützen, Kim
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Varying views on life among people with long-term mental illness2009In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 54-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to explore views of life among people with long-term mental illnesses. The participants' possible cognitive inability to express such views dictated a research design that was both fit for purpose and respectful of their integrity. The study, based on an ethnographic framework, involved photographs and interviews with five women and three men. The participants were the photographers, as well as the authors of their own narratives, and the photographs served as a starting point for the interviews. The interview material was analysed in terms of the phases of interpretation. Four main themes were identified: 'thoughts about God and the meaning of life and death', 'the meaning of relationships with others', 'how animals give meaning to life without demands' and 'the symbolic bearing of objects on life'. These four themes represent key existential issues among people with long-term mental illnesses, but they lack confidants to share or discuss these matters with.

  • 2.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Andershed, B.
    Svensson, E.
    Lützen, Kim
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Family member's expectation of the psychiatric healthcare professionals' approach towards them2011In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 146-157Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The importance of involving family members in the care of individuals with schizophrenia or other psychotic illnesses has received increasing attention within psychiatric healthcare services. However, investigations among family members suggest that they often experience a lack of involvement. The professionals' approach towards them may have bearing on whether they feel involved or not. The aim of this survey was to investigate what aspects family members of individuals receiving psychiatric care ascribe as important in relation to the healthcare professionals' approach towards them and how these aspects agree with their actual experiences. Seventy family members of individuals with schizophrenia or other psychotic illnesses from various parts of Sweden replied to a questionnaire that was developed in order carry out this survey. Results of this survey suggest that the participants valued openness, confirmation, cooperation and continuity as important aspects in the professionals' approach towards them. The results also show a low level of agreement between the participants' actual experience of the professionals' approach and what they consider as important. The knowledge produced in this survey can contribute to an understanding of the expectations family members have regarding the professionals' approach towards them. Such knowledge plays an important role in contributing to the development of a family-focused perspective within psychiatric healthcare services. Abstract The importance of involving family members in the care of individuals with schizophrenia or other psychotic illnesses has received increasing attention within psychiatric healthcare services. However, several studies suggest that family members often experience a lack of involvement. Furthermore, research indicates that family members' experience of the professional's approach has bearing on whether they feel involved or not. Thus, the aims of this study were to investigate the level of importance that the family members of individuals with schizophrenia or other psychotic illnesses ascribe to the professionals' approach, the level of agreement between their experiences and what they consider as important, and aspects they consider to be important with regards to contact with professionals. Seventy family members from various parts of Sweden participated. Data were collected by the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire and open-ended questions. The median level and quartiles were used to describe the distribution, and percentage agreement was analysed. Open-ended questions were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The results reveal that the majority of the participants consider Openness, Confirmation, and Cooperation as important aspects of a professional's approach. Continuity emerged as an additional aspect. The results show a low level of agreement between the participants' experience and what they consider as important.

  • 3.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Lützen, Kim
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Svensson, E
    Andershed, B
    Developing the concept of family involvement and alienation questionnaire in the context of psychiatric care2008In: International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1445-8330, E-ISSN 1447-0349, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 439-49Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Ewertzon, Mats
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Lützen, Kim
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Svensson, E.
    Andershed, B.
    Family members' involvement in psychiatric care: experiences of the healthcare professionals' approach and feeling of alienation2010In: Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 1351-0126, E-ISSN 1365-2850, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 422-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The results contribute knowledge of family member's (from a large geographic area) experiences of psychiatric healthcare professionals' approach towards them, an approach that is characterized by 'Openness', 'Confirmation' and 'Cooperation'. The results contribute knowledge that their experiences of the professional's approach is partly associated with a feeling of being alienated from professional care, characterized by 'Powerlessness' and 'Social isolation'. The result also contributes knowledge of relationships between family member's level of satisfaction in their contact with psychiatric care and their experience of the healthcare professionals' approach and feeling of alienation. Abstract The involvement of family members in psychiatric care is important for the recovery of persons with psychotic disorders and subsequently reduces the burden on the family. Earlier qualitative studies suggest that the participation of family members can be limited by how they experience the professionals' approach, which suggests a connection to the concept of alienation. Thus, the aim of this study was in a national sample investigate family members' experiences of the psychiatric health care professionals' approach. Data were collected by the Family Involvement and Alienation Questionnaire. The median level and quartiles were used to describe the distributions and data were analysed with non-parametric statistical methods. Seventy family members of persons receiving psychiatric care participated in the study. The results indicate that a majority of the participants respond that they have experiencing a negative approach from the professionals, indicating lack of confirmation and cooperation. The results also indicate that a majority of the participants felt powerlessness and social isolation in the care being provided, indicating feelings of alienation. A significant but weak association was found between the family members' experiences of the professionals' approach and their feelings of alienation.

  • 5.
    Lützen, Kim
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Blom, Tammy
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Ewalds-Kvist, Beatrice
    Winch, Sarah
    Moral stress, moral climate and moral sensitivity among psychiatric professionals2010In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 213-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between work-related moral stress, moral climate and moral sensitivity in mental health nursing. By means of the three scales Hospital Ethical Climate Survey, Moral Sensitivity Questionnaire and Work-Related Moral Stress, 49 participants' experiences were assessed. The results of linear regression analysis indicated that moral stress was determined to a degree by the work place's moral climate as well as by two aspects of the mental health staff's moral sensitivity. The nurses' experience of 'moral burden' or 'moral support' increased or decreased their experience of moral stress. Their work-related moral stress was determined by the job-associated moral climate and two aspects of moral sensitivity. Our findings showed an association between three concepts: moral sensitivity, moral climate and moral stress. Despite being a small study, the findings seem relevant for future research leading to theory development and conceptual clarity. We suggest that more attention be given to methodological issues and developing designs that allow for comparative research in other disciplines, as well as in-depth knowledge of moral agency.

  • 6.
    Magnusson, Annabella
    et al.
    Ersta Sköndal University College.
    Lützen, Kim
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Factors that influence collaboration between psychiatric care and CSSs: Experiences of working together in the interest of persons with long-term mental illness living in the community2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, ISSN 0283-9318, E-ISSN 1471-6712, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 140-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Since de-institutionalization of psychiatric care (PC) took place in Sweden during the second half of the 20th century, the intended collaboration between the two organizations, PC and community social service (CSS) has been evaluated as inadequate in providing care for persons with long-term mental illness living in the community.

    Aim: The aim of this explorative study was to examine factors that influence interdisciplinary teamwork between PC and CSSs based on the experience of nursing staff within two separate organizations.

    Method: Five focus groups were selected as an appropriate method to collect data. Two of these groups were recruited from the PC and three from the CSSs. The focus groups consisted of psychiatric nurses and mental healthcare workers. A qualitative content analysis was used to identify major themes in the data.

    Findings: Two main themes were found, external organizational factors and interpersonal factors that deter or enhance collaboration between PC and CSS. Separate care plans, unclear times for meetings were found to be a plausible reason for communication failure. The focus groups representing each of the two organizations viewed themselves as 'us and them'. Different ideologies and goals for caring and service and how to use each other's competence seemed to be explanations as well as consequences of not finding ways to work together.

    Conclusion: The results of this study points to the need for the two organizations to find ways to work more effectively together to realize a joint responsibility for the patient/client. 

  • 7. Oresland, Stina
    et al.
    Maatta, Sylvia
    Norberg, Astrid
    Lützen, Kim
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Patients as 'safeguard' and nurses as 'substitute' in home health care2009In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 219-230Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One aim of this study was to explore the role, or subject position, patients take in the care they receive from nurses in their own home. Another was to examine the subject position that patients say the nurses take when giving care to them in their own home. Ten interviews were analysed and interpreted according to a discourse analytical method. The findings show that patients constructed their subject position as 'safeguard', and the nurses' subject position as 'substitute' for themselves. These subject positions provided the opportunities, and the obstacles, for the patients' possibilities to receive care in their home. The subject positions described have ethical repercussions and illuminate that the patients put great demands on tailored care.

  • 8.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Lützen, Kim
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Ivarsson, A. -B
    Eriksson, H.
    Intensive psychiatric care2010In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 25, no s1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Salzmann-Erikson, Martin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Lützen, Kim
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing. Karolinska institutet.
    Ivarsson, A. -B
    Eriksson, H.
    Intensive psychiatry: creating, preserving and restoring stability2012In: European psychiatry, ISSN 0924-9338, E-ISSN 1778-3585, Vol. 27, no s1, p. 577-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction. Psychiatric intensive care units (PICU) are rarely described since it is secluded from external insight. At the same time, it is highly intensive since staff and patients interact around the clock in the most acute phase of psychiatric illness. The PICUs admit patients who are considered extremely unmanageable within psychosis units or acute psychiatric wards, and who often demonstrate aggressive or other forms of severe behaviors.

    Objectives. This raises the question: What is going on in these units and what constitutes nursing care?

    Methods. Spradley's 12-step ethnographic methodology was applied. Data was collected through more than 200 hours of field work on three PICUs including 16 hours of formal interviewing and numerous of informal interviews; data also consisted of writing memos and field notes. The field work aimed to understand the staff member's way of interact with the patients and what they did to care for these patients who was considered as unmanageable.

    Results. The findings presented here describe how and when nursing care is provided in PICUs. The findings are presented in relation to themes, as these emerged within the psychiatric intensive nursing care. Six themes emerged as frames for nursing care: providing surveillance, soothing, being present, trading information, maintaining security and reducing.

    Conclusions. These themes are used to strike a balance between turbulence and stability and to achieve equilibrium. As the nursing care intervenes when turbulence emerges, the PICU becomes a sanctuary that offers tranquility, peace and rest.

  • 10. Öresland, Stina
    et al.
    Määttä, Syliva
    Norberg, Astrid
    Jörgensen, MW
    Lützen, Kim
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Nurses as guests or professionals in home health care2008In: Nursing Ethics, ISSN 0969-7330, E-ISSN 1477-0989, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 371-83Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore and interpret the diverse subject of positions, or roles, that nurses construct when caring for patients in their own home. Ten interviews were analysed and interpreted using discourse analysis. The findings show that these nurses working in home care constructed two positions: ;guest' and ;professional'. They had to make a choice between these positions because it was impossible to be both at the same time. An ethics of care and an ethics of justice were present in these positions, both of which create diverse ethical appeals, that is, implicit demands to perform according to a guest or to a professional norm.

1 - 10 of 10
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