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  • 1. Bjorklund, Gunilla
    et al.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Driver behaviour in intersections: formal and informal traffic rules2005In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 239-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Drivers' behaviour in intersections is not only influenced by the rules of priority in the intersection but also by the design of the intersection as well as the behaviour of other road users. If behaviours that supplement or contradict formal traffic rules become common in a particular traffic intersection, it is an indication that an informal traffic rule has been used. In the present study a sample of 1276 Swedish drivers (aged 18-74 years) responded to questions about how often they would yield to another driver in 10 hypothetical crossing situations. In all crossing situations the respondents were told that there was no major road, implying that they should always yield the right of way to traffic coming from the right (the right-hand ride). The results showed that drivers' reported behaviour varied over different intersections. As expected, the formal rule of priority (i.e., the direction from which the other driver was coming) was an important determinant for drivers' yielding behaviour. However, cues for informal rules such as the other driver's behaviour and road breadth were also of importance. Different groups of drivers could be identified according to their strategies of yielding behaviour. One group of drivers reported that they rarely yielded, whereas another group reported that they always did so. A third group complied with the right-hand rule most of the time, whereas the behaviour of a fourth group varied over intersections. The implications of the results and the appropriateness of the right-hand rule are discussed.

  • 2.
    Frans, Örjan
    et al.
    Uppsala university.
    Rimmo, P-A.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Fredrikson, M.
    Trauma exposure and post-traumatic stress disorder in the general population2005In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, ISSN 0001-690X, E-ISSN 1600-0447, Vol. 111, no 4, p. 291-299Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To examine the lifetime prevalence of trauma experiences and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Questionnaire-assessed PTSD, the type of traumatic event experienced, perceived trauma impact, and trauma frequency in 1824 randomly selected men and women. PTSD lifetime prevalence was estimated at 5.6% with a 1 : 2 male-to-female ratio, in spite of men reporting greater trauma exposure. The highest PTSD risk was associated with sexual and physical assault, robbery and multiple trauma experiences. Controlling for trauma type did not account for gender differences, while controlling for experienced distress did. The conditional probability for PTSD varied as a function of trauma type, frequency and impact of the event, with increased rates associated with prevalent trauma exposure and higher perceived distress. The latter accounted for the gender effect, suggesting that gender differences in PTSD in part represent a generally greater vulnerability to stress in women.

  • 3. Persson, Henriette
    et al.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Rapport 12: Rätt fart - Vibration eller Ljudsignal2002Report (Other academic)
  • 4. Persson, Henriette
    et al.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Rapport 7: Rätt fart - Privata testförare Före, Under och Efter2002Report (Other academic)
  • 5. Persson, Henriette
    et al.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Boethius, Eva
    Rapport 5: Rätt fart - Allmänhetens inställning till trafiksäkerhet Före och Efter2002Report (Other academic)
  • 6. Wallén Warner, H. M.
    et al.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Why Do Drivers Speed?2005In: Traffic and Transport Psychology: Theory and Application / [ed] Underwood, G., Amsterdam: Elsevier , 2005, p. 505-511Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Wallén Warner, Henriette
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Drivers’ beliefs about exceeding the speed limits2008In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 11, no 5, p. 376-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to examine drivers’ view on their own speeding behaviour by focusing on belief based measures as suggested by the theory of planned behaviour. A sample of car owners (N = 162) completed a questionnaire including both direct and belief based measures of the latent variables in the theory of planned behaviour. The results showed that indices constructed with direct measures of attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control made a larger contribution to the prediction of drivers’ intention to exceed the speed limits in both urban and rural environments, than did indices constructed with belief based measures. An extensive set of belief composites was produced and standard multiple regressions showed which of these contributed to the prediction of attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control, as well as intention. The use of these findings is discussed.

  • 8.
    Wallén Warner, Henriette
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Driver's decision to speed: a study inspired by the theory of planned behavior2006In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 9, no 6, p. 427-433Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using structural equation modeling (LISREL 8.71), drivers' everyday speeding behavior was predicted using the theory of planned behavior as a frame of reference. One hundred and twelve test drivers had a device installed in their vehicles that continuously logged their speeding behavior in a large area under an extended period of time. The test drivers also completed a questionnaire including questions inspired by the theory of planned behavior. It was found that the independent variables stipulated in the theory afforded a level of prediction of drivers' self-reported speeding as well as of their logged speeding. Attitude towards speeding, subjective norm, and perceived behavioral control were significant determinants of self-reported speeding. Self-reported speeding, and subjective norm, but not perceived behavioral control, did then contribute to the prediction of drivers' logged speeding. The fact that perceived behavioral control did not directly contribute to the prediction of drivers' logged speeding may be due to the possibility that drivers with several years of experience already take into account the actual control they have over the target behavior. As the theory of planned behavior can be used as a frame of reference to predict drivers' everyday speeding behavior, it is suggested that the drivers might decide on a target behavior and in living up to this decision they continuously monitor their target speed during everyday driving. 

  • 9. Wallén Warner, Henriette
    et al.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    How does long-term use of an informing ISA-device affect drivers?2006In: the 26th International Congress of Applied Psychology (ICAP), Athens, Greece, 2006Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Wallén Warner, Henriette
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    The long term effects of an ISA speed-warning device on drivers’ speeding behaviour2008In: Transportation Research Part F: Traffic Psychology and Behaviour, ISSN 1369-8478, E-ISSN 1873-5517, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 96-107Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Different systems of intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) have already been tested in the field and large-scale implementation is being discussed. But do we really know how these systems affect drivers during long-term use?Between 2000 and 2003 a total of 61 test drivers had an ISA speed warning device installed in their vehicles. Data from these trials show that,initially, the device greatly reduced the amount of time the majority of test drivers spent above the speed limit, and to some extent also reduced their mean speeds, but this effect decreased with time. Further analyses of 27 of the 61 test drivers then showed that the activation of the warning system affected different drivers in quite a homogenous way, with regards to attitude, subjective norm and self-reported behaviour, but not with regards to perceived behavioural control. After activation,long-term use did, however, affect the test drivers in a homogenous way with regards to attitude, subjective norm and self-reported behaviour, as well as perceived behavioural control. When considering these results it must be remembered that the device tested was a first generation ISA speed-warning device and with more research we think that different ISA-systems could be improved and the effects made more stable during long-term use.

  • 11.
    Warner, Henriette Wallén
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Why do drivers speed?2004In: the 3rd International Conference on Traffic & Transport Psychology (ICTTP), Nottingham, UK, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Attitudes2001In: Traffic Psychology Today / [ed] Barjonet, Pierre-Emmanuel, Boston: Kluwer Academic Publishers , 2001Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 13.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    The human factor in game-vehicle accidents: A study of drivers' information acquisition1981Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The problem of game-vehicle accidents is discussed in terms of drivers' strategies for visual search in driving. To find possible measures for reducing the number of wildlife accidents, four studies were undertaken. Initially, two exploratory investigations were made: a survey of drivers' expectancies concerning moose in traffic and a study involving self reports of accidents and near accidents with moose. The results from these investigations give no evidence that drivers' experience, knowledge, orattitudes concerning moose are related to wildlife accidents.Instead they suggested that the visualsearch patterns of drivers might explain some of the effects obtained. In a series of field experiments, drivers' ability to detect moose dummies was explored, and in a final study, the effectiveness of the game crossing sign was investigated experimentally. The rsults were interpreted as evidence that in rural driving, drivers normally scan the view ahead in a systematic and almost automatic way which is not effective for the task of detecting moose. Drivers can easily change their automatic scanning into controlled search for animals but this search is demanding and can probably not be sustained for any length of time without feedback.

  • 14.
    Åberg, Lars
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    The Swedish version of DBQ and speeding behaviour (posterpresentation)2004In: ICTTP, Nottingham, UK, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Åberg, Lars
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Persson, Henriette
    Rapport 8: Rätt fart - Hastighetsöverträdelser och självrapporterad fortkörning2002Report (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Åberg, Lars
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Wallén Warner, Henriette
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Speeding: deliberate violation or involuntary mistake?2008In: Revue europeenne de psychologie appliquee, ISSN 1162-9088, E-ISSN 1878-3457, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 23-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The power of two different theoretical frameworks, the theory of planned behaviour (expanded to include moral norm) and the driver behaviour questionnaire, to predict and explain drivers' speeding behaviour are compared and a combined model is suggested. One hundred and seventy-five test drivers, participating in a large-scale ISA-evaluation, answered a questionnaire in spring 2000. Based on the questionnaire data, logged speeding in autumn 2001 was predicted and LISREL-analysis was used for structural equation modelling. According to the results the two frameworks, alone or in combination, could explain between 38 and 53% of self-reported speeding and between 24 and 26% of logged speeding. A combination of the theory of planned behaviour and the driver behaviour questionnaire is presented and implications for the understanding of driver speed control are discussed.

  • 17.
    Åberg, Lars
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Warner, Henriette Wallén
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Psychology.
    Stability of drivers' attitudes, norms and evaluations2004In: the 3rd International Conference on Traffic & Transport Psychology (ICTTP), Nottingham, UK, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
1 - 17 of 17
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