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  • 1.
    Case, Megan
    Dalarna University, School of Education and Humanities, Education.
    Experiences of idiolect change among English speakers in Sweden2011In: Migration, Narration, Communication: Cultural Exchanges in a Globalised World / [ed] Witalisz, Alicja, Frankfurt am Main, Berlin, Bern, Bruxelles, New York, Oxford, Warszawa, Wien: Peter Lang Publishing Group, 2011, p. 137-148Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Case, Megan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Education.
    Language students’ personal learning environments through an activity theory lens2015In: Researching Language Learner Interaction Online: From Social Media to MOOCs / [ed] Dixon, E., and Thomas, M., San Marcos, TX: CALICO , 2015, 1Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter illustrates a learner-centric approach to investigating the potential of online resources for language learning. In contrast to studies that look at the use of particular applications, tools, or social media platforms in formal educational contexts, this approach takes into account the totality of the personal learning environments learners create for themselves, intentionally and unintentionally, which may include online vocabulary-training applications, connection with native speakers of the target language through social media, immediate and free access to cultural products such as films, music, and the press, and increasingly ubiquitous machine translation. Using an activity theory framework and questionnaire data, the empirical portion of this chapter illustrates some aspectsof the personal learning environments of adults studying a foreign language at the beginner level and draws the following conclusions: (a) exploring the applicability of technologies for language learning can be done bottom up rather than top down; (b) digital tools do not replace nondigital tools, they complement them; (c) the digital native/digital immigrant distinction (Prensky, 2001; Benini & Murray, 2014) is questionable; (d) learner objectives do not always correspond to curricular objectives; and (e) the lines between language learning and language use can be blurred, and this is enabled in part by technology.

  • 3.
    Case, Megan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Education. Örebro University.
    Machine translation and the disruption of foreign language learning activities2015In: eLearning Papers, ISSN 1887-1542, E-ISSN 1887-1542, no 45, p. 4-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines the question of how language teachers in a highly technology-friendly university environment view machine translation and the implications that this has for the personal learning environments of students. It brings an activity-theory perspective to the question, examining the ways that the introduction of new tools can disrupt the relationship between different elements in an activity system. This perspective opens up for an investigation of the ways that new tools have the potential to fundamentally alter traditional learning activities. In questionnaires and group discussions, respondents showed general agreement that although use of machine translation by students could be considered cheating, students are bound to use it anyway, and suggested that teachers focus on the kinds of skills students would need when using machine translation and design assignments and exams to practice and assess these skills. The results of the empirical study are used to reflect upon questions of what the roles of teachers and students are in a context where many of the skills that a person needs to be able to interact in a foreign language increasingly can be outsourced to laptops and smartphones.

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