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  • 1.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Holmsten, Elin
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Multimodal communication and meta-modal discourse2010In: Handbook of Research on Discourse Behavior and Digital Communication: Language Structures and Social Interaction / [ed] Taiwo, Rotimi, Information Science Publishing , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This chapter presents an analysis of recordings of workplace interactions conducted with videoconferencing software. Video-conferencing offers users the widest variety of channels, or modes, of interaction, combining video with voice chat, text chat, whiteboard capabilities and collaborative document manipulation. The video-conferencing environment is therefore conducive to multimodal communication, defined in this chapter as the collaborative use of any one of these modes or combination of modes within one communicative event. The standard form of multimodal communication is a combination of video, voice chat and whiteboard application. The use of other modes is shown to reflect distinct communicative functions. Communicating via multiple modes can be technologically demanding and consequently affect usability, potentially necessitating the use of meta-modal language among video-conference participants. Overtly attending to the modes of communication during online interaction is therefore shown to be part and parcel of video-conferencing, serving to initiate repairwork and facilitate the progression of communication.

  • 2.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Acoustic Variability in the Production of English Vowels by Native and Non-Native Speakers2008In: Issues in Accents of English / [ed] Waniek-Klimczak, Ewa, Newcastle upon Tyne: Cambridge Scholars Publishing , 2008, p. 1-15Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The features of non-native speech which distinguish it from native speech are often difficult to pin down. It is possible to be a native speaker of any of a vast number of varieties of English. These varieties each have their phonetic characteristics which allow them to be identified by speakers of the varieties in question and by others. The phonetic differences between the accents represented by these varieties are very great. It is impossible to indicate any particular configuration of vowels in the acoustic vowel space or set of consonant articulations which all native-speaker varieties of English have in common and which non-native speakers do not share. This study considers the vowel quality in a single word by native and non-native speakers.

  • 3.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Describing Swedish-accented English2006In: FONETIK 06, Lund, 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Does English-medium schooling affect the Swedish spoken by Swedish students?2005In: Forskningsdagen vid Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The proposed presentation is a progress report from a project which is aimed at establishing some phonetic correlates of language dominance in various kinds of bilingual situations. The current object of study is Swedish students starting in classes which prepare for the International Baccalaureate (IB) programme. The IB classes in Sweden are taught in English, except for classes in Swedish and foreign languages. This means that the students are exposed to and speak a good deal more English than previously. The assumption that students will, on the one hand not “damage” their Swedish, and on the other will improve their English simply by attending an English-medium school will be tested. The linguistic background of the students studied will be established. Their English and Swedish proficiency will be tested according to various parameters (vowel quality, the timing of vowels and consonants in VC sequences, vocabulary mobilisation, perceived foreign accent) on arrival at the school, and again after one and three years at the school. The initial recordings have now been made and preliminary results will be reported

  • 5.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Language Dominance in Early and Late Bilinguals2004In: ASLA, Södertörn, 2004Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proposed presentation is a progress report from a project which is aimed at establishing some phonetic correlates of language dominance in various kinds of bilingual situations. The current object of study is Swedish students starting in classes which prepare for the International Baccalaureate (IB) programme. The IB classes in Sweden are taught in English, except for classes in Swedish and foreign languages. This means that after they enter the programme the students are exposed to and speak a good deal more English than previously. The assumption made by many students that they will, on the one hand not “damage” their Swedish, and on the other will dramatically improve their English simply by attending an English-medium school will be tested. The linguistic background of the students studied and their reasons for choosing the IB programme will be established. Their English and Swedish proficiency will be tested according to various parameters (native-like syntax, perceived foreign accent, the timing of vowels and consonants in VC sequences, vocabulary mobilisation) on arrival at the school, and again after one and three years at the school. The initial recordings are now underway. In a preliminary study involving just three young people who were bilingual in Swedish and English, the timing of the pronunciation of (C)VC syllables in Swedish and English was studied. The results of this investigation indicate that it may be possible to establish language dominance in bilingual speakers using timing data. It was found that the three subjects differed systematically in their pronunciation of the target words. One subject (15 years old), who was apparently native-like in both languages, had the V-C timing of both Swedish and English words of a native speaker of English. His brother (17 years old), who had a noticeable Swedish accent in English, pronounced both Swedish and English words in this respect like a native speaker of Swedish. The boys’ sister (9 years old) apparently had native-like timing in both languages.

  • 6.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Language dominance in early and late bilinguals2005In: Högre seminarium i språkvetenskap vid Högskolan Dalarna, Falun, 2005Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Linguistic and cultural consequences of the position of English in Sweden2005In: Heritage island in the ocean of culture = Ostrov nasledija v okeane kultur : Proceedings of the International Seminar on Intercultural Communication = Materialyi Meshdunarodnoj Konferentsii Po Voprosam Mezjdukulturnoj Kommunikatsii, Arkhangelsk, 2005, p. 89-97Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Mobile podcasting as a tool for learning English pronunciation in Vietnam2010In: IADIS Mobile Learning 2010 International Conference, Porto, Portugal, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes a study of pronunciation learning using loaned MP3-players set in a college of business and tourism in Hanoi. Material was developed to help raise student awareness of a number of pronunciation features in English that are generally problematic for speakers of Vietnamese, such as vowel length and quality, and final consonants. This material was delivered to one group of 50 students as 9 pre-recorded audio lessons on the MP3-players. Another group of 61 students were given 8 traditional classroom lessons. Both groups were recorded before and after the study to establish whether their pronunciation improved on the particular features being taught.

  • 9.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Models and Targets for English Pronunciation in Vietnam and Sweden2009In: Research in Language, ISSN 2083-4616, Vol. 7, no 7, p. 113-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to account for the factors that lie behind the choice of models and targets for the pronunciation of English by learners of English in Vietnam and in Sweden. English is the first foreign language in both Vietnam and in Sweden. English is used as a language of international communication in both settings. Swedish learners have much more exposure to spoken English than do Vietnamese learners and the Swedish language is more similar to English than is Vietnamese. These reasons, among others, explain why Swedish accents of English are typically considerably more intelligible than Vietnamese accents of English. Given that the majority of English speakers in the world are not native speakers, it is argued that the traditional learner target of approaching native speaker pronunciations is not appropriate for either group, but especially not for the Vietnamese learners. Instead maximal international intelligibility is a more useful target. To this end, learners need to be exposed to a variety of native and non-native models.

  • 10.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Models and targets for the pronunciation of English in Sweden2008In: II International Conference on Native and Non-native Accents of English (Accents 2008), Lodz, Poland, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Phonetic correlates of unintelligibility in Vietnamese-accented English2009In: FONETIK 09, Stockholm, Sweden, 2009Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Vietnamese speakers of English are often able to communicate much more efficiently in writing than in speaking. Many have quite high proficiency levels, with full command of ad-vanced vocabulary and complex syntax, yet they have great difficulty making themselves understood when speaking English to both na-tive and non-native speakers. This paper ex-plores the phonetic events associated with breakdowns in intelligibility, and looks at com-pensatory mechanisms which are used.

  • 12.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Phonological Dominance In A Bilingual Class-Setting2005In: Colloquium On The Measurement Of Bilingual Proficiency Across Two, Barcelona, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The proposed presentation is a progress report from a project, which is aimed at establishing some phonetic correlates of language dominance in various kinds of bilingual situations. The current object of study is Swedish students starting in classes, which prepare for the International Baccalaureate (IB) programme. The IB classes in Sweden are taught in English, except for classes in Swedish and foreign languages. The programme can be regarded as a type of immersion teaching and the students are exposed to and speak a good deal more English then previously. The assumption that students will, on the one hand not “damage” their Swedish, and on the other will improve their English simply by attending an English-medium school will be tested. The linguistic background of the students studied will be established. Their English and Swedish proficiency will be tested according to various parameters (vowel quality, the timing of vowels and consonants in VC sequences, vocabulary mo! bilisation, perceived foreign accent) on arrival at the school, and again after one and three years at the school. The initial recordings are now underway. In a preliminary study involving just three young people who were simultaneously bilingual in Swedish and English, the timing of children\'s pronunciation of (C)VC syllables in Swedish and English was studied. The results of this investigation indicate that it may be possible to establish language dominance in bilingual speakers using timing data. It was found that the three subjects differed systematically in their pronunciation of the target words. One subject (15 years old), who is apparently native-like in both languages, had the V-C timing of both Swedish and English words of a native speaker of English. His brother (17 years old), who has a noticeable Swedish accent in English, pronounced both Swedish and English words in this respect like a native speaker of Swedish. The boys’ sister (9 years old) apparently has native-like timing in both languages. Reference: Cunningham-Andersson, U. 2003 Temporal indicators of language dominance in bilingual children. In: Proceedings from Fonetik 2003, Phonum 9, 77-80, Umeå University

  • 13.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Quality, quantity and intelligibility of vowels in Vietnamese-accented English2008In: II International Conference on Native and Non-native Accents of English (Accents 2008), Lodz, Poland, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Quality, Quantity and Intelligibility of Vowels in Vietnamese-accented English2010In: Issues in Accents in English 2: Variability and Norm / [ed] Waniek-Klimczak, Ewa, Newcastle: Cambridge Scholars Publications , 2010, p. 3-22Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Response to Peter Siemund’s paper “Independent Developments in the Genesis of Irish English”2004In: Celtic Englishes IV, Potsdam, 2004Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Temporal indicators of dominance in bilingual children2003In: PHONUM 9, Umeå, 2003Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Temporal indicators of language dominance in bilingual children2003In: Fonetik 2003, Umeå University, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the field of bilingualism it is of particular interest to stablish which, if any, of a speaker’s languages is dominant. Earlier research has shown that immigrants who acquire a new language tend to use elements of the timing patterns of the new language in their native language. It is shown here that measurements of timing in the two languages spoken by bilingual children can give information about the relative dominance of the languages for the individual speaker.

  • 18.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    The Role of Memory in Political Discourse in Northern Ireland2005In: European Federation of Associations and Centres for Irish Studies (EFACIS) Fifth Conference, University of Gothenburg, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Using African English in an International academic setting2009In: Mapping Africa in the English-speaking World, Gabarone, Botswana, 2009Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 20.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Vowel duration in a rural variety of Northern Irish English2008In: Urban and Rural Landscapes: Language, Literature and Culture in Modern Ireland, Falun, Sweden, 2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Vowel Quality and Quantity in the English Spoken in Rural Southwest Tyrone2008In: NIS: Nordic Irish Studies, ISSN 1602-124X, E-ISSN 2002-4517, Vol. 7, p. 41-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to describe some of the phonetic variation and characteristics associated with the pronunciation of Northern Ireland English (NIE) in general and the English of rural southwest Tyrone (ERST) in particular. Vowel quality, i.e. the precise sound of the vowels used, expressed in acoustic terms, and vowel quantity, i.e. how long vowels are relative to each other and to surrounding consonants, are of central interest here. ERST vowels may be relatively short or relatively long, depending on factors that are not phonologically relevant in other varieties of English. Vowel shifts from Middle English are only partly carried through, leading to variation according to context and register. Exactly which or a number of possible vowel qualities a speaker chooses to use in a given situation can have sociophonetic significance. Some sounds are clearly stigmatized and can be selectively used or avoided by speakers to achieve desired effects.

  • 22.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Vowels in rural southwest Tyrone2008In: Fonetik 2008 / [ed] Eriksson, Anders; Lindh, Jonas, Göteborg, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to pin down some of the pho-netic variation and oddities associated with Northern Ireland English (NIE) in general and the English of rural southwest Tyrone (ERST) in particular, Vowel quality and vowel quantity relationships are crucial here. ERST may have short or long vowels, depending on factors that are not phonologically interesting in other varieties of English. Vowel shifts from Middle English are only partly carried through, lead-ing to sociophonetic variation.

  • 23.
    Cunningham, Una
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Andersson, S
    Growing up with Two Languages2004Book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Cunningham, Una
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Beers Fägersten, Kristy
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    Holmsten, Elin
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, English.
    “Can you hear me, Hanoi?”: compensatory mechanisms employed in synchronous net-based English language learning2010In: International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, ISSN 1492-3831, E-ISSN 1492-3831, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 161-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper reports the intelligibility difficulties experienced by students of English for academic purposes at a university in Sweden while taking part in synchronous net-based seminars. Connectivity limitations, microphone and headphone problems, background noise and other factors in combination with limited skill in the perception of English speech make it difficult for these students to process speech directed to them. In addition, the speech the students are trying to process may be produced by nonnative speakers of English, either fellow students or teachers. A comparison of simultaneous communication in several of the modes available in the virtual seminar environment showed that students make use of a number of strategies to partly compensate for their failure to optimally perceive and produce speech.

  • 25.
    Sundkvist, Peter
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    Cunningham, Una
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, English.
    "The Devil's Own Accent"2008In: DUCIS: Rural and Urban Landscapes, language, literature, and culture in modern Ireland, Falun, Sweden, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
1 - 25 of 25
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