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  • 101.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Japansk haiku, världens kortaste diktform2004In: Orientaliska Studier, ISSN 0345-8997, no 114, p. 53-57Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 102.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Kärlek med förhinder: Recension av Haruki Murakamis Sputnik älskling2008In: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, no 4, p. 76-77Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 103.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Livet, så som det blev: Recension av Takasues dotters Om mitt liv2007In: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, no 2, p. 50-51Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 104.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Matt översättning av legendarisk reseskildring: Recension av Bashos En färd i det inre av landet2004In: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, no 4, p. 61-62Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 105.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Nioizuke: reconsidering verse linking in haikai no renga2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In linked poetry, modern renku and Edo-period haikai no renga, the ideal of “linking by scent”, nioizuke in Japanese, is regarded as typical for the haikai tradition that followed after Matsuo Bashô. Today it is often used as a generic concept for “Bashô-style verse linking”, but there is not much research done about its background and possible meanings. The modern way of understanding this concept probably originates from an argument by Torahiko Terada, in which it is linked to the montage technique of Western cinema. This understanding has been adapted by several haikai scholars, and eventually it becomes connected with the metaphor theory of Roman Jakobson in an article by Haruo Shirane. The aim of this paper is to deconstruct this modern way of understanding the nioizuke by demonstrating how it has been discussed in older texts and treatises. Analyzing some of the works written by several of Bashô's disciples and followers in later centuries and the often enigmatic descriptions of this “scent” and similar concepts they give, it will be suggested that there originally was no single and generic concept, but several related words which were used to describe ideals very different from the basically structural montage or metaphor theories of modern scholarship. A proposal of a more useful definition of the concept will be made and a few verse links will be interpreted from this perspective to demonstrate the usability of the concept in its supposedly more original form.

  • 106.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    När dödskallarna fylls av regn2011In: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, no 1, p. 52-57Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 107.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Några aspekter av haiku-diktens form, med exempel av Yosa Buson2003In: Orientaliska Studier, ISSN 0345-8997, no 112, p. 3-24Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 108.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Om den lockande utmaningen att övervinna sig själv: Recension av Haruki Murakamis Vad jag pratar om när jag pratar om löpning2010In: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, no 4, p. 61-62Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 109.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Reading Japanese Haikai Poetry: A Study in the Polyphony of Yosa Buson’s Linked Poems2016Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Reading Japanese Haikai Poetry Herbert Jonsson makes an inquiry into the multitude ways in which Japanese linked haikai poetry has been read and understood. A number of poems composed by the eighteenth-century master Yosa Buson are analyzed in great detail. Although closely related to the popular haiku, haikai is often regarded as difficult for non-specialists, but this study offers the reader a wealth of explanations, displaying the varied perspectives available. The first part of the book consists of a thorough investigation of how these poems have been interpreted in the Japanese commentary tradition. The second concluding part offers an innovative study of the poetics of scent (nioizuke), essential for understanding the creative force of this poetry.

  • 110.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Renku Linked Poetry2019In: The Literary Encyclopedia: Volume 10.2.2: Japanese Writing and Culture / [ed] Vol. editors: Mats Arne Karlsson (University of Sydney), Roy Anthony Starrs (University of Otago), The Literary Dictionary Company Limited , 2019Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 111.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Shasei as an Ecocritical Perspective in Contemporary Haiku2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The concept shasei (“sketching from life”) has been central in the formation of modern Japanese haiku. Although much criticised by academics, especially when applied to the reading of classical haiku, it is undeniably an important concept in modern and contemporary haiku poetics. One may find arguments around shasei in the writings of the traditionalist Takahama Kyoshi as well as in the essays of the avant-garde haiku poet Kaneko Tōta. The concept is, however, defined in different ways by different authors and the reason for adhering to it as an ideal may thus vary.

    In this paper, the shasei concept will be analyzed in the light of how it has been discussed by some of the most influential modern and contemporary haiku poets. Critical and theoretical writings, from the early texts on the subject by Masaoka Shiki to contemporary essays by Mayuzumi Madoka will be investigated. By contrasting different ways of understanding shasei an argument will be attempted to reach a meaningful definition of the concept, by which it may be used as a tool for gaining a deeper understanding of contemporary haiku. It will also be shown how shasei, although originating in a different context, is closely related to the ecocritical way of questioning the anthropocentric perspective; the notion of getting into contact with and be affected by the the physical world, as expressed by Scott Slovic among others.

    A few examples of contemporary haiku will also be analysed to illustrate how the concept has relevance for reading a variety of styles. The gentle emotionalism of Mayuzumi Madoka as well as the drastic similes of Kaneko Tōta will be shown to be fully understandable only when studied in the light of this concept.

  • 112.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Skicklig studie i feghet och förslagenhet: recension av Osamu Dazais Inte längre människa2008In: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, no 3, p. 77-78Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 113.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Templet som var för vackert: Recension av Yukio Mishimas Den gyllene paviljongens tempel2010In: Karavan, ISSN 1404-3874, no 4, p. 60-61Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 114.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The theory of the unchanging and the ever-changing in haikai-poetry2003In: The 10th International Conference of the EAJS, Warsawa, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 115.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The view of shasei in the writings of Kaneko Tōta2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the early twentieth century, the concept shasei (“sketching from life”) has repeatedly been discussed in critical writing about Japanese haiku. It was originally included in the theoretical framework surrounding haiku by Masaoka Shiki. Presumably influenced by Western techniques of painting, he turned it into a method to gain creativity and into a specific style of writing. After Shiki, the concept has been at the center of many debates, and it has been defined in widely different ways.

    Most research about shasei has focused on the early developments of Shiki and his followers, but in this paper, I will analyze how it has been discussed by Kaneko Tōta, one of the most influential poets of today’s avant-garde haiku. Tōta’s writing on haiku comprises a wide variety of texts. Some are easy-to-understand handbooks aimed at beginners, some are complex theoretical works aimed at the ever ongoing critical discussion within the haiku movement. Others are autobiographical reflections on his own development as a poet, and yet others are interpretations of his own poems and those of other poets. In these works he frequently touches upon the shasei concept, but not without ambivalence. Although he recognizes its importance, and frequently recommends composing in the shasei style to learn the art, he also criticises its limitations and the lack of coherence in Shiki’s writings about it.

    I will, however, not only focus on Tōta’s outright discussions in which shasei is mentioned directly. In many of his arguments and interpretations, he proposes ideas that may be understood as a sophisticated development of the shasei theory, which casts light on the creative process behind his poems. It also raises several questions about the reading of his poems and other contemporary haiku.

  • 116.
    Jonsson, Herbert
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    What may be gained from mistranslations of Japanese haiku?2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    What may be gained from mistranslations of Japanese haiku?

    Translations into Western languages of Japanese haiku have been done for well over a century. The shortness of these poems with their seemingly simple structure has made the form attractive to translators with little or no knowledge of the original language, and in both old and newer publications of translated haiku, mistranslations abound. In translation studies, the focus is usually on the strategies followed to reach a, in some sense, successful translation. In this paper, however, I will investigate a few examples, in English and Swedish, that may rather be regarded as failures and consider why these have turned out in this way. Following George Steiner, I will suggest that translation is a hermeneutic process that is open ended. Mistranslation will thus not be understood as a complete failure, but rather as a first tentative step towards understanding. In that way we may analyze the structural and contextual aspects of the (mis)translation and show how adjustments of these may help us to get beyond what we may regard as common sense and get closer to the very different world of the poem. This may also help us to reflect over the way in which conventions and the cultural context function to define the borderline between understanding and misunderstanding.In addition I will discuss the common theory in haiku translation, maintained by David Barnhill, Steven D. Carter and others, insisting on that the words of a poem, even when translated, should be rendered in the same order as in the original. It will be shown how this theory often lead to what may be called "pidgin translations" which may have influenced the development of Western haiku into a poem that is slightly different from the form practiced in Japan.

  • 117.
    Jonsson, Sandra
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Rhyme in translation: How rhymes in Mother Goose are translated into Japanese2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [ja]

    詩、特に韻の翻訳はは難しいと考えられており、訳すことは無理だと考える向きもいる。翻訳が難しい韻を、翻訳者はどのように訳したのかを調べる為、本研究では二人の翻訳者による訳を見る。作品は有名なマザーグースのナーサリー・ライムである。翻訳者、和田誠と谷川俊太郎である。翻訳手法を確かめる為、本研究では韻の数また韻の種類を見た。また、どのように韻を踏ませたのかも調べた。二人の翻訳者を見比べると、韻の訳し方の違いが明らかになる。韻を訳す傾向が低い谷川に比べて、和田は韻を訳す傾向が高い。

  • 118.
    Lindblad, Jonathan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Translation strategies of H.P. Lovecraft’s neologisms into Japanese2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study conducted to investigate the different strategies applied by two Japanese translators translating H.P. Lovecraft's neologisms. The neologisms for the study were collected from Clore's (2009) lexicon and analysed based on Newmark's (1988) twelve types of neologisms. Each neologism was then compared to its Japanese equivalent found in the Japanese translations of Lovecraft's collective work. The neologisms were analysed and categorised based on Newmark's (1988) eleven proposed strategies. Seven of Newmark’s (1988) eleven strategies were found and "Naturalisation" was the most frequently applied strategy.

  • 119.
    Lindgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, French.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Translating Japanese Manga into French2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The translation of exportation of manga, or Japanese comics, started in the late 1980s, and in Europe, the biggest market is France. In the present paper, we will focus on the techniques used to translate manga into French, identify and analyse them.

  • 120.
    Lindgren, Charlotte
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, French.
    Saito, Rieko
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    NGL-projekt vid Högskolan Dalarna: 3. Rieko Saito intervjuas av Charlotte Lindgren2016Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    NGL-projekt vid Högskolan Dalarna inom språkavdelningen som handlar om pedagogiska metoder i nätbaserad språkundervisning.

  • 121.
    Marinescu, Emanuéla
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The ikumen of GQ Japan and Vogue Japan: Attitudes toward fatherhood in popular online media discourse2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In the context of Japan's current socio-economic problems and the shift in attitudes regarding traditional gender roles, fatherhood, in particular

    ikumen - a term denoting fathers who actively participate in childrearing and household activities - has received increased attention in the media in recent years. Considering the media's potential to generate and reinforce stereotypes and influence public opinion, an investigation of the discourse surrounding ikumen can reveal what the term has come to signify and whether the understanding of it varies across different audiences.

    This paper analyzes 23 online articles from two large circulation Japanese publications aimed at men and women in their 30s-40s. The explicit and implicit attitudes encoded in the publications' online articles which contain the keyword

    ikumen are extracted and analyzed within the framework of appraisal theory. Additionally, variables such as the referent of the term ikumen, the nature, theme and length of the articles are considered.

    The investigation reveals that the meaning of

    ikumen is not limited to that of an emotional-affective approach to fatherhood, but can also encompass desirable outer appearance, as well as a s0cial phenomenon and label. These components are emphasized to varying degrees depending on both source and text category.

  • 122.
    Natsue Ekstrand, Doris
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Linguistic Challenges Observed in the Speech Patterns of First Generation Japanese Immigrants in Brazil2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The first Japanese immigrants arrived in Brazil in 1908 establishing Japanese communities around the country in order to preserve the Japanese culture and language. The social and cultural environment had great influence on speech patterns during the process of language integration, as described in Kuyama (1999). The purpose of the present study is to analyse the linguistic challenges observed in the speech patterns of first generation of Japanese immigrants in two communities in Brazil, Aliança and Fukuhaku-Mura. Contact between Japanese and Portuguese languages allowed the development of two main speech patterns derived from bilingualism: lexical borrowing from Portuguese and code-switching, which are the object of the study. The present study will try to identify the phonetic and morphological challenges in the speech of first generation Japanese immigrants through analysis of the dialogues from Gardenal (2008). The results showed that there are still phonological integration challenges with phonemes and syllable structure that do not exist in the Japanese phonological system. The morphological integration of the Portuguese verbs follows the same pattern as that of the English verbs with the addition of the verb suru ‘to do’ to the verb. However the Portuguese verbs are conjugated in the third person singular while the English verbs are kept in the infinitive form. The verbal and nominal agreements present errors due to the lack of gender and number in the Japanese grammar.

  • 123.
    Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Article Review: Jäppinen, Sanna: “Saamalaiset cityssä” Yliopisto2001In: Eurasian Studies Yearbook, ISSN 1025-7721, Vol. 73, p. 10-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 124.
    Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Belief of sauna spirits among young Finns1999In: The 6th annual Central Eurasian Studies Conference, Indiana University, Bloomington (USA), 1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 125.
    Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Implimentation, success and challenges of teaching Japanese online.2011In: The 13th International Conference of EAJS (European Association of Japanese Studies), Tallinn, Estonia, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 126.
    Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Into the steam, into the dream: the Finnish sauna as a rite of passage2000Licentiate thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 127.
    Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Investigating the Future of Finnish Congruency: Focus on Possessive Morphology2006In: the Linguistics Society of Japan 132nd general meeting, Tokyo (Japan), 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 128.
    Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Investigating the Future of Finnish Congruency: Focus on Possessive Morphology2005Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This study examines variation and change in the Finnish possessive morphology during the past few decades focusing on colloquial Helsinki Finnish. The variation in the morphological marking of possession is considered to be one of the most drastic changes in spoken Finnish (cf. Nuolijarvi 1986b). The prescriptive construction of possession in Finnish consists of the genitive form of a personal pronoun + suffix; however, in real usage, three possessive constructions are observed: (1) minun kirjani (pronoun + suffix) 'my book,' (2) kirjani (suffix-only), (3) minun kirja (pronoun-only). The main purpose of this study is to determine whether double-marking is disappearing and is being replaced by the 'pronoun-only' variant, as suggested by Paunonen (1995). The data for this study were collected from an oral Discourse Completion Test questionnaire, interviews, and the media. The data were analyzed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The results indicate that double-marking has, indeed, been decreasing over the last few decades. However, contrary to Paunonen's 1995 prediction that the 'pronoun-only' form would be the dominant variant in the near future, my findings indicate that the 'suffix-only' form is quite dominant even among young workers (aged 20--39) who favored the 'pronoun-only' variant almost exclusively 10--20 years ago. Paunonen (1995) also discovered that the language spoken by the same age group remained stable over periods of time. Yet my present study shows that one particular age group, namely the youth of 1990, drastically changed their choice of variants 10 years later while the language of the other age groups remained stable. This phenomenon signifies the possibility that the change toward the use of the 'pronoun-only' form may be no longer progressing and has become a case of 'age grading'; alternatively, a new change toward the 'suffix-only'variant is beginning to take place.

  • 129.
    Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Numeric Data of Central Eurasia2001In: Eurasian studies yearbook , ISSN 1025-7721, Vol. 73Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 130.
    Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Variation in the Finnish possessive: A new written standard?1999In: 28th annual conference on New Ways of Analyzing Variation (NWAV-28), Toronto, Canada, 1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 131.
    Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Variation in the Finnish possessive form1999In: The 28th Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Association of the Southwest, University of Texas, San Antonio, 1999Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 132.
    Niendorf, Mariya
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The Suitability of E-learning for Teaching Intermediate/Advanced Level Japanese2012In: The Suitability of E-learning for Teaching Intermediate/Advanced Level Japanese, 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 133.
    Niendorf, Mariya
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Kumagai, Yoko
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Mizufune, Yoko
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Implementation, success and challenges of teaching Japanese online2011In: Japanese language education in Europe, Tallinn, Estonia: Association of Japanese Language Teachers in Europe , 2011, p. 219-220Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 134.
    Nordvall, Joel
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Perceptions of Boys' Love manga among gay men in Japan2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Created largely for, and by, young girls and women, 'BL' (Boys' Love) is a popular genre of

    comic books and novels originating from Japan that depicts young men having romantic and sexual

    relations with one another.

    This essay discusses how BL literature is perceived by Japanese gay- and bisexual men, who

    are not the target audience of the genre. A quantitive survey and a series of interviews have been

    cunducted, and my research aims to present an overview of their perceptions of BL literature while

    connecting and comparing the results to previous debate and controversy surrounding the genre.

    The data has been collected from 40 participants who responded to the questionnaire and 3

    interviewees, and presents a variety opinions on BL expressed by gay and bisexual men in Japan.

  • 135.
    Nykänen, Jennifer
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Roald Dahl’s The BFG in Translation: The lexically creative idiolect of "the BFG" and its translation into Japanese2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    A translator works as a mediator between an original work that has been written in one language, a source text, and those who will be the audience of the translation, or, in other words, the target text. Translating a text is often a challenging task, as the translator must keep in mind both the source text and its author’s intentions with the text, and also its intended audience, but also keep in mind the target audience of the target text. Translating can become even more challenging with children’s literature, as they, among other things, often can contain very creative, imaginative and playful use of language. In this study,

    The BFG, a popular children’s book from 1982 written by the British author Roald Dahl, is analyzed – both the English source text and the Japanese translation by Taeko Nakamura. The research question to be answered is the following: When looking at the speech style, or idiolect, of the character "the BFG" of Roald Dahl’s The BFG, with a focus on neologisms, wordplay and allusions, what difficulties exist in the source text and what efforts have been made by the translator in attempts to achieve an equivalent effect in the target text? The results of this study display several difficulties that can arise when attempting to translate the idiolect of the BFG, especially due to its vast amount of expressive language. Replacement with standard language and deletion were two of the main translation strategies, and the number of identified cases of neologisms, wordplay and allusions in the source text was over double the amount identified in the target text. However, it is also shown how the translator has used different means to compensate for the source text features that may have gotten lost in translation.

  • 136.
    Saito, Rieko
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    A Joint Research Project Which Encourages Learning among Non-native Speakers: The Challenge of Web-based Interaction among Students in China, South Korea and Sweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce a joint research project, which was carried out during 2012 (Spring and Autumn) in collaboration between four universities in China, South Korea and Sweden. This joint research project was established to investigate ways to raise the socio-cultural competence of students who learn Japanese at each university through interactions in their common language, Japanese. This paper also aims to discuss the further possibilities of Japanese language education which are not only limited to learning the language.

  • 137.
    Saito, Rieko
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Hayakawa Thor, Masako
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    How to make active interactions in Japanese as a second language.2012In: International Conference of ICT for Language Learning / [ed] Pixel, Libreriauniversitaria.it , 2012, p. 211-214Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper analyzes Japanese language classes at Dalarna University in Sweden that are held through a web conferencing system. It discusses how students’ learning and language acquisition can be supported by making better use of the available features of using a web conferencing system for language lessons. Of particular interest is the existence of an “information gap” among students, created because of the limits posed by distance communication. Students who take Japanese courses at Dalarna University usually access classes from their home, which are located all over Sweden or even abroad. This fact can be utilized in language classes because the “information gap” can lead to interactions that are essential for language learning. In order to make use of this natural “information gap” and turn it into an opportunity for communication, our classes used a teaching method called “personalization” [Kawaguchi, 2004].  “Personalization” aims to persuade students to express their own ideas, opinions, feelings and preferences. The present analysis suggests that “personalization” in web-based language classes is a surprisingly effective teaching method. By making students explain about things at home (why they have them, what they use them for, or why they are important), students become motivated to express themselves in Japanese. This makes communication meaningful and enhances students’ interest in improving their vocabulary. Furthermore, by knowing each other, it becomes easier to create a ”supportive classroom environment” [Nuibe, 2001] in which students feel able to express themselves. The analysis suggests that that web-based education can be seen not simply as a supplement to traditional face-to face classroom education, but as a unique and effective educational platform in itself.

  • 138.
    Saito, Rieko
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Hayakawa Thor, Masako
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Tokobano manabiwo shiensuru enkakunihongokyouiku towa nanika: sweden dalarna daigaku no jirei kara2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 139.
    Saito, Rieko
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Hayakawa Thor, Masako
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    スウェーデン・韓国・中国・日本をオンラインでつなぐ―複文化能力育成を目指して―: Connecting Sweden, South Korea, China and Japan Through Online Exchanges - to raise learners' pluricultural competence2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [ja]

    筆者らは、スウェーデン・韓国・中国の大学に通う日本語学習者(中級~上級)を対象に2012年の春学期より遠隔日本語交流を行っている。目的は、母語の異なる色々な学習者との交流を通して、互いの文化を学び、歩みよることである。筆者らは、交流会を通して、学習者が多様な場面に柔軟に対応し、文化間の仲介者となる力を育成したいと考えた。本稿では、この交流会が留学経験のない学習者に異文化接触の機会を提供しているかどうかに焦点を当て、彼らがどのように交流会を体験し、何を学んだか、作文、アンケート、フォローアップインタビューから明らかにする。また、日本語を母語としない人々が日本に多数移住する昨今、日本語母語話者が、交流会を通してこの異文化接触の機会をどう受け止めたのかについても検証する。

  • 140.
    Saito, Rieko
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Hayakawa Thor, Masako
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Developing Intercultural Competence and Language Skills Through International Online Collaborative Learning2017In: Cases on Audio-Visual Media in Language Education / [ed] Catherine Hua Xiang, IGI Global, 2017, p. 304-327Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 141.
    Saito, Rieko
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Hayakawa Thor, Masako
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Mizufune, Yoko
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    López-Cordero, Mario
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Spanish.
    Pruth, Alex
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Portuguese.
    Pedagogical Methods in Web-Based Language Teaching2014In: Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference on Computers in Education / [ed] Liu, C.-C., Japan: ICCE 2014 Organizing Committee , 2014, , p. 5p. 768-772Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper presents a research project that is being conducted at Dalarna University in Sweden. The aim is to study the following: 1) The quality of online language education compared with that of campus education, and 2) Advantages and disadvantages of online language education and how the disadvantages might be overcome. The project consists of two parts: pedagogical methods in online language education from the teachers’ point of view and from the students’ point of view. The first part was conducted in 2012 and various characteristics (benefits and difficulties) of online language education were identified. Flexibility and wider opportunities were general benefits, while lack of physical co-presence, difficulty in having lively debates/discussions, and high dropout rates were among the problems. The second part of the project (being conducted in 2014) aims to investigate how students experience online language learning. The goal is to explore alignments and misalignments between teachers’ perspectives and students’ perspectives, and to develop methods to enhance the quality of online education.

  • 142.
    Saito, Rieko
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Iwasaki, H.
    Pusan National University, Republic of Korea.
    Lao, Y.
    Donghua University, China.
    Hayakawa Thor, Masako
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Designing an international environment in language teaching2013In: EDULEARN13: Proceedings / [ed] L. Gómez Chova, A. López Martínez, I. Candel Torres, 2013, p. 5867-5876Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Raising students’ intercultural competence has been one of the major issues in language education (Byram 2000, Kramsch, Léby & Zarate 2008, etc). Byram (2000) defines intercultural competence as: “the ability to see relationships between different cultures – both internal and external to a society – and to mediate, that is, to interpret each in terms of the other, either for themselves or for other people.” It also covers the ability “to critically and analytically understand that one’s own and the other culture’s perspectives are culturally determined rather than natural.” (Byram 2000) Kramsch (2010) claims that educators therefore should provide students with opportunities to help them define and design for themselves their “third place” or “third culture”, a sphere of interculturality that enables language students to take an insider’s view as well as an outsider’s view on both their first and second cultures. It is this ability to find/establish/adopt this third place that is at the very core of intercultural competence. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce the joint research project which was carried out during the years of 2012 and 2013 in collaboration with four universities: Pusan National University (South Korea), Busan University of Foreign Studies (South Korea), Donghua University (China) and Dalarna University (Sweden). This joint research project was established to investigate ways to raise the intercultural competence of students who learn Japanese at each university. The main goal of this research is to design a learning environment where students can actively interact with each other in their target language (Japanese) and develop their intercultural competence through these interactions. Other than developing their communicative competence, we aim at developing the following of the students’ competences: • The ability to deepen their self-reflection. • The awareness of the presuppositions they hold and the cultural basis of many of these (Byram2011).This research is based on three studies (carried out in the spring term 2012, the autumn term 2012, and the spring term 2013). Five Japanese language teachers, one or two from each university, participated in the project. 17 students participated in the first term, 21 in the second term and 41 in the third term. The students from each university interacted online outside of the ordinary classes.In our presentation we will describe the challenges we have met and what we have learnt thus far by organising this kind of international study (how the environment was prepared, how topics were chosen, what kind of tools we chose, how we made the students deepen their thoughts, etc). We will also present the learning results obtained by the students.

  • 143.
    Saito, Rieko
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Iwasaki, Hiroyoshi
    Matsuura, Keiko
    Yichen, Lao
    Hayakawa Thor, Masako
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Designing an international environment in language learning2013In: EDULEARN13: 5TH International conference on education and new learning technologies, 2013, p. 5867-5876Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Raising students' intercultural competence has been one of the major issues in language education (Byram 2000, Coste, Moore, Zarate 2009, Kramsch 2010, etc). Byram (2000) defines intercultural competence as: "the ability to see relationships between different cultures - both internal and external to a society - and to mediate, that is, to interpret each in terms of the other, either for themselves or for other people." It also covers the ability "to critically and analytically understand that one's own and the other culture's perspectives are culturally determined rather than natural" (Byram 2000). Kramsch (1993) also claims that language learners need to define and design for themselves their "third place" or "third culture" through language learning. This ability to find/establish/adopt such a third place is at the very core of intercultural competence. The purpose of this presentation is to introduce a joint research project, which was carried out during 2012 and 2013 in collaboration between four universities: Pusan National University (South Korea), Busan University of Foreign Studies (South Korea), Donghua University (China) and Dalarna University (Sweden). This joint research project was established to investigate ways to raise the intercultural competence of students who learn Japanese at each university. The main goal of the project is to design a learning environment where students can actively engage with each other in the target language (Japanese) and develop their intercultural competence through these interactions. Other than developing communicative competence, we aim to support the development of the following student competences: An increased ability for self-reflection. An awareness of the presuppositions they hold and their cultural basis (Byram 2011). The research is based on three studies (carried out in the spring term 2012, the autumn term 2012, and the spring term 2013). Five Japanese language teachers, representing each of the collaborating universities, participated in the project. 17 students participated in the first term, 21 in the second term and 41 in the third term. Students from each university also interacted online outside of the ordinary classes. In this presentation, we outline the challenges we have met and what we have so far learned by organizing this kind of study. Among other things, we describe how the learning environment was prepared, how topics were chosen, the kinds of tools we chose, and our efforts to increase students' abilities for self-reflection. We will also discuss the learning results obtained by students.

  • 144.
    Saito, Rieko
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Pruth, Alex
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Portuguese.
    Inose, Hiroko
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Mizufune, Yoko
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Hayakawa Thor, Masako
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Pedagogical methods in web-based language teaching-mapping2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this presentation is to introduce the research project progress in “the mapping of pedagogical methods in web-based language teaching" by Högskolan Dalarna (Dalarna University). This project will identify the differences in pedagogical methods that are used for online language classes. The pedagogical method defined in this project is what the teachers do to ensure students attain the learning outcomes, for example, planning, designing courses, leading students, knowing students' abilities, implementing activities, etc. So far the members of this project have analyzed the course plans (in the language department at Dalarna University) and categorized the learning outcomes. A questionnaire was constructed based on the learning outcomes and then either sent out remotely to teachers or completed face to face through interviews. The answers provided to the questionnaires enabled the project to identify many differences in how language teachers interact with their students but also, the way of giving feedback, motivating and helping students, types of class activities and materials used. This presentation introduces the progress of the project and identifies the challenges at the language department at Dalarna University. Finally, the advantages and problems of online language proficiency courses will be discussed and suggestions made for future improvement.

  • 145.
    Svanberg, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Linguistic Mysteries in a Swedish village and on a Japanese island: A corpus-based translation study on Japanese translationese by Swedish to Japanese translation2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims to study translationese in the Japanese language, and to study if there are any differences between Swedish to Japanese translations compared with English to Japanese translations– which are studied more. Claimed features and characteristics of Japanese translationese include the increase use of personal pronouns, loanwords and paragraph length. However in this study the usage of formal language and gender language in translationese will also be included to in order to distinguish differences between translationese and non-translationese.

    The method used to analyze the material is corpus-based translations studies which is a rather newly developed method to study translation and especially translationese. This method will be used in this thesis to compare translated and non-translated texts. As material two novels are used – one originally written in Japanese, and one originally written in Swedish but translated into Japanese. Due to the lack of translation corpora in Japanese, the novels had to be digitalized in order for the author to browse in the novels. By comparing two novels of the same genre it will be clear what the translated novel lack compared to the non-translated novel as translationese is considered broken or bad translation. The analysis and the comparison will be done with the theories about the features of Japanese translationese.

    The study found that some of the features of translationese were adoptable on Swedish to Japanese translated texts, but there were few significant differences regarding formal language and gender language.

  • 146.
    Södergren, Susanne
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    ”Metcha suki ya nen”: A sociolinguistic attitude survey concerning the Kansai dialect2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [ja]

    西日本にある関西弁はたくさん色々な形で標準語と異なる。関西弁は1970年代の後に、全国で人気を得た。この社会言語学の研究の目的は現在の関西弁に対する感情を調査することである。これは関西弁の話し手ではなくて日本語の母語話者に配ったアンケートで調査された。質的また量的な分析である。結果は一般的に関西弁に好意的であったが、人気がある理由もいろいろあり、それらをさぐるために歴史的なそして文化的な見方を通して議論する。

  • 147.
    Takamiya, Yumi
    et al.
    University of Alabama at Birmingham.
    Aida Niendorf, Mariya
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Beikoku to suweeden no nihongo gakushuusha o tsunaida jissen  : Aidenthithi o teema ni shita torikumi [Connecting US-Swedish Japanese language learners: Identity as a main theme]2017In: Soosharu nettowaakingu apuroochi to nihongo kyoiku kenkyu happyokai houkoku ronshu [Selected conference proceeding: Social networking approach and Japanese language education 2016] / [ed] H. Shimizu, Tokyo: Japan Society for the Promotion of Science , 2017, p. 111-120Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 148.
    Taylor, Nicholas
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The loss of meaning in the translation of Shōnen manga : A comparative analysis of the character impressions between the English and Japanese versions of Dragon Ball2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyze whether or not the translation of

    shōnen manga, a subset of Japanese comics, cannot be done into English while maintaining the complete original intent and meaning of the work in its source language. This was done through a survey asking both native Japanese speakers and non-native Japanese speakers to compare panels from both the Japanese and English versions of the manga Dragon Ball, and through their responses strengthening the hypothesis that the inherent meaning between the two versions did indeed end up feeling different. The main differences cited were based partly on yakuwarigo, so-called "role language", and that there were inherent implications in the Japanese speech patterns that were not accurately conveyed in the English translation, thereby leading to some loss of context between the two versions, making the impressions of the characters differ in some areas. Hence, the results of this study accentuate that some aspects of Dragon Ball will be lost in translation.

  • 149.
    Toyoshima, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Subtitling anime: How to feed cultural information to anime fans?2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [ja]

    この論文は日本語から英語への字幕翻訳について調査している。字幕に関しては、翻訳上の特別な問題がある。字幕のスペースなどの規則、そして読む速度などファンの希望の問題もある。一般的にアニメのファンは日本の文化を経験したいと考えている。その目的のために、ファンが作り出したのがポップアップのテキストである。そこに文化に関する特別な言葉や訳注を書くのである。しかしその翻訳手法は通常ののルールに沿ったものではない。この論文ではポップアップのテキストの長所と短所を調べる。

  • 150.
    Täckenström, Felicia
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    A feminist approach to Risa Wataya’s Keritai Senaka2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this thesis is to examine whether Risa Wataya ’s Keritai Senaka (2003, English title: I want to kick you in the back: 2015) enforces, or resists, patriarchal attitudes. Utilizing close reading, the analysis is conducted and divided into 3 parts: firstly, investigating whether the character portrayals challenge the notion of a feminine/masculine binary. Secondly, analysing the depicted relations; and, lastly, analysing what is implied (whether comments can be traced or not), all from a primarily feminist perspective.

    The results of the analysis suggest that the character portrayals and the relations and structures depicted in the novel are complex, and that especially the characterisation of the main character, as well as what can be noted from the implied author, indicate that the novel resists patriarchal attitudes. Even though, as the author notes, the notion of the implied author and its importance in a study can be questioned, the main character ’s definite deviation from the “norm” is enough to conclude that the novel does undermine patriarchal attitudes, at least to some extent.

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