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  • 251.
    Cassegård, Carl
    Sociologiska institutionen, Göteborgs universitet.
    Lek och empowerment: de alternativa rummens roll i sociala rörelser2010In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 49-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Play and empowerment: the role of alternative spaces in social movements

    The article examines the role played by alternative space in social movements and argues that it plays a crucial role in counter-acting feelings of powerlessness and facilitating the empowerment of subaltern groups. Alternative space is defined – using Benjamin’s notions ofshock, nature and history – as constituted by forms of interaction in which society is made to appear as history. To facilitate empowerment, alternative space must, firstly, provide a place for subaltern groups in which they are no longer subordinated; secondly, instill hope that social change is possible and encourage such change; and, thirdly, expand or consolidate alternative space itself. These tasks can easily enter into conflict with each other, since they sometimes appear to require alternative space to adopt more ”abstract” forms of interaction in which aspects of the social situation are bracketed and sometimes more ”concrete”ones in which such aspects are again given attention. In order to study how movements may relate to this difficulty, the article looks at three contemporary Japanese social movements with NAM, New Start / New Start Kansai and the General Freeter Union as central organizations. Only the third successfully combines the three tasks, in large measure through its skillful use of the play-element.

  • 252.
    Cassegård, Carl
    Lunds universitet.
    Livsvärldens rationalisering och studiet av partikularism1997In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 59-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Particularism and the reationalization of the lifeworld

    A phenomenon that has attracted increasing attention during the last decades is particularism (e.g. ethnic identification, nationalism). I belive that Habermas’ theory of the rationalization of the lifeworld can be made fruitful for the study of this phenomenon. The concept of the ”rationalization of the lifeworld”, however,needs to be differentiated in order to grasp the ambivalent character of modern particularism, which is both rational and irrational. It is rational in the sense that it is often supported by conscious reasons; it is irrational in the sense that these reasons do not claim validity outside of the particular group. I therefore propose that the concept of ”the rationalization of the lifeworld” be divided in two: critical rationalization and generalization. Critical rationalization means an increase in people's ability to critizice beliefs and that justifications therefore have to be made more explicit. Generalization means that justifications are made more generally acceptable. These two kinds of rationalization are not always parallell. They are separate processes, and modern particularism is, I believe, the result of a divergence of critical rationalization and generalization. This differentiation of the conceptof rationalization is therefore a necessary first step in order to turn Habermas’ theory into a theory of particularism. It also has the advantage of more clearly bringing into light some features of his view of reification.

  • 253.
    Castles, Stephen
    Oxford universitet.
    Migration i en tid av globalisering2003In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 19-26Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 254.
    Cederberg, Christina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kjellgren, Erika
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    "Många ser det omöjliga istället för det som är möjligt.": En kvalitativ intervjustudie om framgångsfaktorer för ett vård- och omsorgsboende2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Our understanding of what factors contribute to the success of human service organisations is limited. Social workers often occupy leadership roles in such organisations, and so research is needed on how leadership influences success. This study explored how staff at a care home for older people perceive factors important for creating success, and the function of leadership. A case study design was adopted employing a qualitative approach, with data collected using semi-structured interviews. A care home identified as something out of the ordinary was chosen as the field site and three care staff and the care home manager selected as participants. A qualitative analysis indicated that a work environment characterized by solidarity generated resilience and satisfaction among staff. A focus on the residents, an innovative work approach and a visible, honest and accommodating manager were factors perceived as vital for creating success.

  • 255.
    Cederlöf, Anna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Man, Isabelle
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    "Men shit, hur fan har vi kunnat glömma bort det?": Falu kommuns socialtjänsts arbete gällande prostitution2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether and how the social services in the municipality of Falun is managing social work related to prostitution. It is a qualitative study based on three focus group interviews conducted in parts of the social services organization in the municipality of Falun. The empirical data collected was analyzed from an intersectional perspective.

    Several distinct findings emerged from the study. Social work against prostitution does not exist in the social services organization in the municipality of Falun. The organization possesses no procedures or guidelines for this kind of work, and no preventive work or cooperation with other organizations is carried out.

    It also emerged, that several social work officers had a stereotype image of who a potential sex- seller could be. This fact may influence who would be able to get any support from social services regarding to this social problem.

  • 256.
    Charmaz, Kathy
    Sonoma State University.
    Tensions in qualitative research2007In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 44, no 3, p. 76-85Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 257. Cheung Chung, M
    et al.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Austin, C
    Barkby, H
    Brown, H
    Cash, S
    Ellingford, J
    Hanger, L
    Pais, T
    Posttraumatic stress disorder in older people after a fall2009In: International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry, ISSN 0885-6230, E-ISSN 1099-1166, Vol. 24, no 9, p. 955-964Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 258.
    Choura, Sofia
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sociology.
    Zakholi, Karin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sociology.
    Kampen tillbaka: En kvalitativ studie om kriminellas återintegrering2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to get a clearer knowledge about why it is difficult to return to a status as normal after served prison sentence by Scheff's stamping theory, Goffman's stigma theory and Hirschi's social band theory. The issues that the study concerns are about the struggles back into society.The study is based on a qualitative method to gain a more in-depth picture of the purpose and questions of the study. We have chosen to interview four respondents, of which three spokesmen are from KRIS and one spokesman from X-Cons. The interviews in the study are a major source of information.The results found in this study show that all four respondents stated that returning to work, family life and friends can be problematic, there are any obstacles to start dating. The self-image of the former criminal is not good during prison, they begin to see themselves as criminal with a criminal identity. After serving prison time, the former criminals change their mindset, which may even change their self-image to something positive. For a former criminal, it is common to "pass" as normal by concealing their true identity. The social ties to their children, relatives and friends tend to be good while social ties to peers and employers tend to be problematic. As a former criminal, it is common to engage in completing their grades and vocational education, but it is unusual to study at college and start business. It is rare for former criminals to engage in hobby associations and sports clubs, they often choose to work out at a gym and take part in non-profit associations. It is common for the former criminal to think that laws and regulations are good because without them society would not have worked.

  • 259.
    Cigéhn, Göran
    Umeå universitet.
    Klassidentitet vid seklets slut1999In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 35, no 1, p. 121-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Class identity at the end of the century

    There has been a long term decline in working class identity in Sweden since the fifties, but now, in the late nineties, there has been a strong shift upwards. This can be seen in two Swedish survey data sets from 1993 and 1997. Data also show a widening gap between classes regarding class identity and other class related beliefs and opinions. These findings can be interpreted as an increasing class polarization concerning ideological orientations. Former strong associations between class and such orientations have become even stronger. Class voting has weakened in absolute terms (i.e. using the Alford index) when comparing the working and middle classes. However, if you control for class identity there is a remarkably strong class voting tendency when using odds ratios as a measure of relative class voting. Class voting is also highly dependent on class origin. Workers with working class origin and working class identity have a very pronounced tendency to support socialist parties compared to their middle class opposites. Such a comparison gives an unusually high score on the Alford index. The idea of ”the death of class” can find no support in these findings, on the contrary the class society seems to hold a real firm grasp of its citizens.

  • 260.
    Coniavitis, Thomas
    Panteion universitet, Aten.
    Sociologin i Grekland: från 1907 fram till Metaxas-diktaturen (1936–1940) och andra världskriget2012In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 49, no 1, p. 66-79Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sociology in Greece from 1907 to the Metaxas dictatorship (1936–40) and the Second World War

    This paper focuses on pre-conditions for sociology to develop and the subject matters of emerging sociology in Greece. Pre-conditions were at hand but without continuity, and the opportunity for sociology to develop was lost. Sociology is said to have started in 1907 with the book The Social Question by Georgos Skliros. He presented sociology and Marxism as identical and deals with Greek society and (among other things) the language issue, all of which triggered off a vibrant debate. Sociological associations and journals were started. However, the initially reformist perspective of social science was gradually replaced by an approach that was more socio-philosophical, influenced by classical sociology, German sociology in particular. This turn was associated with the institutionalization of sociology at the universities during the 1920’s. The Metaxas dictatorship in 1936 put a stop to any further development of sociology for a long time.

  • 261.
    Connell, Raewyn
    University of Sydney.
    Periphery and metropole in the history of sociology2010In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 72-86Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 262.
    Cvetkovic, Anita
    et al.
    Örebro universitet.
    Öljarstrand, Anneli
    Örebro universitet.
    Humorforskning i svenska organisationer och arbetslivssammanhang: en litteraturöversikt2015In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 104p. 363-394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on humor in Swedish organizational and working life contexts: a literature review

    The objective of this study was to provide a more coherent picture of research on humor in Swedish organizational and working life contexts, where even non-strictly organizational studies were included due to their high relevance in the research area. A systematic review of the literature published during the last 15 years was used to summarize an obviously undeveloped research area in Sweden. Published peer-reviewed articles that primarily examine humor were analyzed. Seventeen representative articles have been found and systematically reviewed and compared focusing on four questions: purposes and contexts of the studies, theoretical approaches, methods and main results. The analysis identifies four focal points that describe current state of humor research in Sweden: 1) positive function of humor appears to be a predominant research issue while humor’s subversive function, power relations and negative functions are less represented, 2) limited comparative studies of different contexts 3) biased theoretical approaches and limited studies of theory developing approach 4) overrepresented qualitative research approach. The above issues were discussed in relation to relevant international humor research.

  • 263. Dag, Munir
    et al.
    Kullberg, Christian
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Can they work it out and do they get any satisfaction?: Young Swedish physically disabled men’s and women’s work involvement and job satisfaction2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Disability Research, ISSN 1501-7419, E-ISSN 1745-3011, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 287-303Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 264.
    Dahl, Göran
    Lunds universitet.
    Heidegger, Spengler och autentisk fascism2006In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is an attempt to make our understanding of fascism more comprehensive. By focusing Heideggers short texts from 1933 and relating them to his other writings it is shown that he hoped that the German National Socialism would be much more radical than it really was. Thus, we can see him as an example of ”authentic fascism” which came in conflict with Realfascismus.

  • 265.
    Dahl, Rebecca
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Gillström, Josefine
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Integrering och inkludering genom föreningslivet: En intervjustudie om föreningslivets möjligheter till integration av nyanlända och ensamkommande barn och ungdomar2019Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Over the past few years, children and youths have been forced to escape their homes. On arrival in Sweden it is important that they become included into the Swedish society. The organization ‘Save the Children’ has developed a project to include these newly arrived children through organized sport activities. The main purpose of this study is to examine whether the leaders involved in this project experience that sport can promote integration for these newly arrived children. This qualitative study is based on 5 semi-structured interviews with the leaders. The main results are as follows: Most of the leaders find that this contributes to a certain level of integration in the society, the project contributes with knowledge despite some obstacles and the leaders have gained a greater cultural understanding and are assisting these children and youths in their everyday life.

  • 266.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet; Stockholm University.
    Ageing in a changing place: a qualitative study of neighbourhood exclusion2019In: Ageing & Society, ISSN 0144-686X, E-ISSN 1469-1779Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An inclusive neighbourhood is a key facilitator enabling older adults to age in place. Neighbourhoods have been identified as a dimension of social exclusion important to older adults, and it has been argued that older adults are particularly vulnerable to neighbourhood change. The aim of this study was to explore older adults’ experiences of neighbourhood exclusion within the context of neighbourhood change. Focus groups were undertaken in the urban and rural areas of a metropolitan borough in England involving a total of 41 older adults, with data analysed via thematic analysis. Urban areas in the borough studied have transformed following the closure of the mining industry, with a high level of deprivation in many areas, while some rural areas have undergone gentrification. Within the context of structural neighbourhood change, four themes were identified: community cohesion, political agency, feelings of safety and the physical environment. The themes were interlinked, which calls for collaboration across traditional lines of professional responsibility, and for research that encompasses different aspects of neighbourhood exclusion. This study contributes with knowledge on older adults’ experiences of exclusion, including novel findings on the importance of political agency and collective memory, and identifies actions to combat exclusion. An active involvement of older adults in the development of initiatives to tackle social exclusion is recommended.

  • 267.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet.
    Correlates and predictors of loneliness in old age: Evidence from Sweden and England2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is important to identify factors associated with loneliness in older people if effective policies and strategies to prevent and reduce loneliness are to be developed. In this presentation two studies that identify factors associated with loneliness in old age are reported. Strengths and weaknesses of the studies, which differ in design and focus, shed light on issues of importance for future studies on loneliness.

    The first study was based on data from two waves of SWEOLD, a Swedish longitudinal national survey study (N=613). It aimed to examine the extent to which older people (70+) report feelings of loneliness with a focus on changes in loneliness over time, and on factors predicting loneliness in women and men, respectively. This study showed that older people moved in and out of loneliness over time, but there was a general increase in loneliness as they aged. It also identified gender differences in both incidence and risk factors.

    The second study was based on data from the Barnsley Social Exclusion in Old Age Study, an English cross-sectional community survey (N=1255), and aimed to identify risk factors for social and emotional loneliness in older people (65+). This study identified different, as well as shared, risk factors for social and emotional loneliness, thereby providing further empirical support for the conceptual separation of emotional and social loneliness.

    Taken together, these studies demonstrate the importance of: 1) longitudinal research in order to determine risk factors for loneliness; 2) considering women and men separately; and 3) looking at social and emotional loneliness separately. These approaches in combination will aid the development of effective interventions to reduce loneliness in the older population and to ensure those interventions are targeted at the appropriate groups.

  • 268.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    De äldre och ensamheten2013In: Äldre i Centrum, ISSN 1653-3585, no 1, p. 46-46Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 269.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Older people’s perspectives on the causes of social exclusion2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 270.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Risk för ensamhet2013In: Äldre i Centrum, ISSN 1653-3585, no 3, p. 20-21Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 271.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Social exclusion and care receipt in old age2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 272.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    Dalarna University, School of Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Äldreomsorg i utveckling mot välfärdspluralism2013In: Socialgerontologi / [ed] Lars Andersson, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2013, 2, p. 221-248Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 273.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Karolinska Institutet.
    Agahi, Neda
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lonelier than ever?: Loneliness of older people over two decades2018In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 75, p. 96-103Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To live with feelings of loneliness has negative implications for quality of life, health and survival. This study aimed to examine changes in loneliness among older people, both with regard to prevalence rates, and socio-demographic, social and health-related correlates of loneliness. This study had a repeated cross-sectional design and was based on the nationally representative Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD). Analyses of trends in loneliness covered the years 1992, 2002, 2004, 2011 and 2014, and included people aged 77 years or older (n=2 572). Analyses of correlates of loneliness covered 2004 and 2014, and included people aged 70 years or older (n=1 962). Logistic regression analyses were conducted with findings presented as average marginal effects. Contrary to what is often assumed, there has been no increase in loneliness among older people over time (1992-2014). Regression analyses for 2004 and 2014 showed that social and health-related correlates were more strongly associated with loneliness than socio-demographic correlates. Psychological distress was most strongly associated with loneliness, followed by widowhood. Most associations between the correlates and loneliness were stable over time.

  • 274.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Agahi, Neda
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholms universitet.
    Schön, Pär
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholms universitet.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholms universitet.
    Planned and unplanned hospital admissions and their relationship with social factors: Findings from a national, prospective study of people aged 76 years or older2018In: Health Services Research, ISSN 0017-9124, E-ISSN 1475-6773, Vol. 53, no 6, p. 4248-4267Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To examine the relationship between social factors and planned and unplanned hospital admissions among older people.

    Data Sources/Study Setting

    2011 data from the Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD) and data from the Swedish National Patient Register until December 31, 2012.

    Study Design

    The study had a prospective design. Data were analyzed via Cox proportional hazard regressions with variables entered as blocks (social factors, sociodemographic and ability factors, health factors).

    Data Collection

    Data were collected via interviews with people aged 76+ (n = 931).

    Principal Findings

    Living in institutions was negatively associated with planned admissions (hazard ratio (HR): 0.29; confidence interval (CI): 0.09–0.88), while being in receipt of home help was positively associated with unplanned admissions (HR: 1.57; CI: 1.15–2.14). Low levels of social contacts and social activity predicted unplanned admissions in bivariate analyses only. Higher ability to deal with public authorities was positively associated with planned admissions (HR: 1.77; CI: 1.13–2.78) and negatively associated with unplanned admissions, although the latter association was only significant in the bivariate analysis.

    Conclusions

    Hospital admissions are not only due to health problems but are also influenced by the social care situation and by the ability to deal with public authorities.

  • 275.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköpings universitet.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholms universitet.
    Long-term influences on loneliness: Results of a nationally representative study with follow-up after 20 years2016Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 276.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköpings Universitet.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholms Universitet.
    Long-term predictors of loneliness in later life: Results from two longitudinal national studies2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 277.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköping University.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholms universitet.
    Long-term predictors of loneliness in old age: Results of a 20-year national study2018In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 190-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: There is a general lack of longitudinal research on loneliness in old age. Drawing on life course theory and the convoy model, this study aimed to examine whether there is an association between loneliness in old age and social engagement 20 years earlier.

    Method: Data from the nationally representative Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (2002 and 2011 data collection waves) and the Swedish Level of Living Survey (1981 and 1991 data collection waves) were used, including 823 individuals with an average age of 82.4 years at follow-up.

    Results: Each form of social engagement in old age was associated with the same form of social engagement 20 years earlier. Close forms of social engagement were negatively associated with loneliness in old age; as were more distant forms of social engagement, but only when they were considered solely in old age.

    Conclusion: Patterns of social engagement in old age were established at least 20 years earlier. Close forms of social engagement are long-term predictors of loneliness, although current social engagement tended to be more influential on loneliness. The study underlines the importance of interventions targeted at close relationships that can provide social support in old age.

  • 278.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Andersson, Lars
    Linköpings universitet.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet ; Stockholms universitet.
    Predictors of loneliness among older women and men in Sweden: A national longitudinal study2014Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To examine the extent to which older women and men (70+) report feelings of loneliness with a focus on: a) changes in reported loneliness as people age, and b) which factors predict loneliness.

    Methods: Data from the 2004 and 2011 waves of SWEOLD, a longitudinal national survey study, was used. The prediction of loneliness in 2011 by data collected in 2004 was examined in three logistic regression models for the total sample (n=587), for women and for men.

    Results: Older people moved in and out of frequent loneliness over time, but there was a general increase in loneliness as they aged. Recent widowhood and depression increment were associated with loneliness in both women and men. Loneliness, widowhood, depression and mobility problems measured in 2004 predicted loneliness uniquely in women in 2011; whereas low level of education and social contact reduction predicted loneliness uniquely in men.

    Discussion: Loneliness is not always a stable condition, demonstrating the importance of longitudinal research. Gender differences in incidence and predictors make it important to look at women and men separately both when researching loneliness and when targeting interventions to prevent or reduce loneliness in older people.

  • 279.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, Lars
    National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Aging Research Center, Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Predictors of loneliness among older women and men in Sweden: A national longitudinal study2015In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 409-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Longitudinal research on loneliness in old age has rarely considered loneliness separately for men and women, despite gender differences in life experiences. The objective of this study was to examine the extent to which older women and men (70C) report feelings of loneliness with a focus on: (a) changes in reported loneliness as people age, and (b) which factors predict loneliness.

    Method: Data from the 2004 and 2011 waves of SWEOLD, a longitudinal national survey, was used (n D 587). The prediction of loneliness in 2011 by variables measured in 2004 and 20042011 variable change scores was examined in three logistic regression models: total sample, women and men. Variables in the models included: gender, age, education, mobility problems, depression, widowhood and social contacts.

    Results: Older people moved into and out of frequent loneliness over time, although there was a general increase in loneliness with age. Loneliness at baseline, depression increment and recent widowhood were significant predictors of loneliness in all three multivariable models. Widowhood, depression, mobility problems and mobility reduction predicted loneliness uniquely in the model for women; while low level of social contacts and social contact reduction predicted loneliness uniquely in the model for men.

    Conclusion: This study challenges the notion that feelings of loneliness in old age are stable. It also identifies important gender differences in prevalence and predictors of loneliness. Knowledge about such differences is crucial for the development of effective policy and interventions to combat loneliness in later life.

  • 280.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work. Karolinska institutet.
    Berndt, Hanna
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm Universitet.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholms universitet.
    Schön, Pär
    Receipt of formal and informal help with specific care tasks among older people living in their own home: National trends over two decades2018In: Social Policy & Administration, ISSN 0144-5596, E-ISSN 1467-9515, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 91-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sweden is seen as a typical example of a social-democratic welfare regime, with universal and generous welfare policies. However, in the last decades, there have been substantial reductions in the Swedish provision of care for older people. This study aimed to examine trends in sources of care-receipt in older people (77+) living in their own home and with a perceived need of help with two specific tasks: house cleaning or food shopping. Trends in care-receipt were examined in relation to gender, living alone, having children and socioeconomic position. Data from the 1992, 2002 and 2011 data collection waves of the national study SWEOLD was used. Response rates varied between 86 and 95 per cent, and the sample represents the population well. Trends and differences between groups were explored in bivariate and logistic regression analyses. There was a reduction in formal care-receipt regarding house cleaning and food shopping over the study period. It was more common for women than men to receive formal care, and more common for men than women to receive informal care. Reductions in formal care have affected older women more than older men. Still, living alone was the most influential factor in care-receipt, associated with a greater likelihood of formal care-receipt and a lower likelihood of informal care-receipt. It can be concluded that public responsibility for care is becoming more narrowly defined in Sweden, and that more responsibility for care is placed on persons in need of care and their families.

  • 281.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Berndt, Hanna
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholms universitet.
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholms universitet.
    Schön, Pär
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholms universitet.
    Sweden’s changing welfare mix over two decades: Trends in care for community-based older people with perceived need2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 282.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Frank, Amanda
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Naseer, Mahwish
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Systematic review of longitudinal risk factors for loneliness among older adults2019Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 283.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Correlates of social and emotional loneliness in older people: evidence from an English community study2014In: Aging & Mental Health, ISSN 1360-7863, E-ISSN 1364-6915, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 504-514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Loneliness is an important influence on quality of life in old age, and has been conceptualised as consisting of two dimensions, social and emotional. This paper describes analyses that sought to produce models of social and emotional loneliness in older people, using demographic, psychological and health, and social variables.

    Method: Older people (aged 65+, N=1255) from the Barnsley metropolitan area of the United Kingdom were recruited randomly from within a stratified sampling frame, and received a questionnaire-based interview (response rate: 68.1%). The questionnaire contained items and scales on demographic, psychological and health and social characteristics, and a validated measure of loneliness that assesses both social and emotional loneliness.

    Results: Of the respondents, 7.7% were found to be severely or very severely lonely, while another 38.3% were moderately lonely. Social and Emotional Loneliness shared 19.36% variance. Being male, being widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, low income comfort, low contact with family, low contact with friends, low Activity, low Perceived Community Integration, and receipt of community care were significant predictors of Social Loneliness (R=.50, R2=.25, F(18, 979)=18.17, p<.001). Being widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, high activity restriction, low income comfort, and non-receipt of informal care were significant predictors of Emotional Loneliness (R=.55, R2=.30, F(18, 973)=23.00, p<.001).

    Conclusion:  This study provides further empirical support for the conceptual separation of emotional and social loneliness. Consequently, policy on loneliness in older people should be directed to developing a range of divergent intervention strategies if both emotional and social loneliness are to be reduced.

  • 284.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Living on the edge: Social exclusion and the receipt of informal care in older people2016In: Journal of Aging Research, ISSN 2090-2204, E-ISSN 2090-2212, p. 1-10, article id 6373101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Older people have been identified as being at risk of social exclusion. However, despite the fact that care is commonly required in later life and the majority of that care provided by informal carers, a connection between social exclusion and informal care-receipt has rarely been considered. The aim of this study was to examine how informal care-receipt is related to social exclusion.

    A face-to-face questionnaire survey on social exclusion and informal care-receipt was carried out among older people (n=1255) living in Barnsley, United Kingdom. Multivariable analyses examined the association between social exclusion and categories of informal care-receipt: care receiver; assurance receiver; non-receiver with no need; non-receiver with need.

    Compared to being a non-receiver with no need participants were more likely to be a care receiver or assurance receiver if they had higher levels of social exclusion. The highest level of social exclusion, however, was found in non-receivers with need. Despite a lack of informal care and support, formal practical support and personal care was also low in this latter group. Findings are discussed in relation to the conceptualisation of care-receipt and how contact with medical services could be an opportunity for identification and appropriate referral of non-receivers with need.

  • 285.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Psychological, health and social predictors of emotional and social loneliness in older people2013In: Proceedings of the 20th IAGG World Congress of Gerontology and Geriatrics, Seoul, Korea, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Loneliness in old age has been shown to have negative outcomes such as mortality, physical and mental health problems, and reduced activity levels. To reduce loneliness in older people, factors associated with loneliness and open to intervention must be identified.

    Methods: Older people (aged 65+, N=1255) from the United Kingdom received a questionnaire-based interview (response rate: 66.0%). The questionnaire covered items on demographic, psychological, health and social characteristics. It also contained the de Jong-Gierveld Loneliness Scale (de Jong-Gierveld & Kamphuis, 1985), measuring Emotional and Social Loneliness.

    Findings: Eight percent of the respondents were found to be severely or very severely lonely, while another 38% were moderately lonely. Being female, widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, high activity restriction, and high concern about personal finances were significant predictors of Emotional Loneliness (F(17, 976)=25.59, R2=.31, p<.001).  Being female, widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, high concern about personal finances, low contact with family, low contact with friends, low engagement, and low perceived community integration were significant predictors of Social Loneliness (F(17, 982)=19.63, R2=.25, p<.001).

    Discussion:  This study provides empirical evidence for conceptual separation of emotional and social loneliness. Consequently, different targets for intervention are required in order to reduce emotional and social loneliness respectively, although psychological intervention has the potential to reduce both. 

    Background: Loneliness in old age has been shown to have negative outcomes such as mortality, physical and mental health problems, and reduced activity levels. To reduce loneliness in older people, factors associated with loneliness and open to intervention must be identified.

    Methods: Older people (aged 65+, N=1255) from the United Kingdom received a questionnaire-based interview (response rate: 66.0%). The questionnaire covered items on demographic, psychological, health and social characteristics. It also contained the de Jong-Gierveld Loneliness Scale (de Jong-Gierveld & Kamphuis, 1985), measuring Emotional and Social Loneliness.

    Findings: Eight percent of the respondents were found to be severely or very severely lonely, while another 38% were moderately lonely. Being female, widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, high activity restriction, and high concern about personal finances were significant predictors of Emotional Loneliness (F(17, 976)=25.59, R2=.31, p<.001).  Being female, widowed, low well-being, low self-esteem, high concern about personal finances, low contact with family, low contact with friends, low engagement, and low perceived community integration were significant predictors of Social Loneliness (F(17, 982)=19.63, R2=.25, p<.001).

    Discussion:  This study provides empirical evidence for conceptual separation of emotional and social loneliness. Consequently, different targets for intervention are required in order to reduce emotional and social loneliness respectively, although psychological intervention has the potential to reduce both. 

  • 286.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Social exclusion and well-being among older adults in rural and urban areas2018In: Archives of gerontology and geriatrics (Print), ISSN 0167-4943, E-ISSN 1872-6976, Vol. 79, p. 176-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social exclusion (SE) is a process that limits participation in society across life domains, and is associated with poor quality of life. Neighbourhood exclusion has been identified as particularly important for older adults. This paper examines the association between SE and well-being in older adults from urban and rural areas, focusing on neighbourhood exclusion.

    Methods: Using a cross-sectional survey design with a stratified sampling frame, participants (aged 65+) from rural (n=628) and urban (n=627) areas of Barnsley, United Kingdom, completed a questionnaire containing indicators of five SE domains: civic activity, material resources, social relationships, services and neighbourhood. Sequential linear regression models were developed for 1) total sample; 2) rural areas; and 3) urban areas, with well-being regressed on SE indicators after controlling for self-reported health.

    Results: SE indicators explained 13.4% of the variance in well-being in the total sample (of which neighbourhood exclusion explained 1.2%); corresponding figures for the rural model were 13.8% (3.8%) and for the urban model 18.0% (1.7%); the addition of neighbourhood exclusion significantly improved all three models.  Five SE indicators were significant in the rural model, compared with seven in the urban model, with four common to both.

    Discussion: Neighbourhood exclusion explained more variance in well-being in rural than urban areas, whereas exclusion from services explained more variance in urban than rural areas. Area characteristics and the role of neighbourhood should be considered in policy initiatives to reduce SE and promote well-being.

  • 287.
    Dahlberg, Lena
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    McKee, Kevin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Fritzell, Johan
    Lennartsson, Carin
    Trends in social exclusion among older women and men in Sweden2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Social exclusion is a framework for understanding the complexity of disadvantage across various domains of life such as material resources, social relations, civic activities and services. Reviews have identified a lack of gender perspective in social exclusion research. This paper will introduce the framework of social exclusion, and examine trends over time in the levels of social exclusion across different life domains for older women and men in Sweden.

    Methods: Data on indicators of social exclusion were analysed from respondents aged 76+ years who participated in the 1992, 2002 and 2011 waves of the nationally representative Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD).

    Results: There was evidence of a gender different in exclusion from material resources and civic activities, from which women were more often excluded than men. Regardless of gender there were improvements in access to material resources, such as owning a house/apartment.  Social contacts (visiting or being visited by friends) decreased over time, while engagement in cultural activities and going to restaurants increased.

    Conclusions: Trends in social exclusion in older adults over the last 20 years are dependent on the domain considered. Over a range of indicators, older women were more vulnerable to exclusion than men, which needs to be taken into account in policy to combat exclusion.

  • 288.
    Dahlberg, Therese
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Kardell, Elin
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Beviljad hemtjänst: En jämförelse mellan två kommuner2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore what home care services were granted to older residents of two municipalities in Dalarna in 2016, and whether there were differences between the municipalities in the level of services. A random sample of 64 cases from each municipality’s database was drawn, allowing for descriptive analysis of services granted and bivariate analysis of associations with municipality and age, gender, and living arrangements of cases. The results showed that the municipalities offered similar home care services, but that the level of services granted differed significantly between municipalities. Municipality moderated the relationships between age, gender, and living arrangements of cases, and between the level of "serviceinsatser" and both age and living arrangements. Social activity service was granted more to older people in one municipality but to younger people in the other municipality. The results are discussed in relation to institutional theory and interpreted as due to conforming forces and local organization.

  • 289.
    Dahlfors, Johanna
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sociology.
    Hultquist, Sara
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Sociology.
    Öppna dörrarna, dörrarna stängs: En kritisk granskning av massmedias syn påarbetsintegrationen i Sverige2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Vi är två studenter som heter Johanna Dahlfors och Sara Hultquist och tillsammans har viarbetat fram detta examensarbete som heter ”Öppna dörrarna, dörrarna stängs. Uppsatsen ärförfattad inom ämnet sociologi på högskolan dalarna i Falun.Syftet med studien var att undersöka den debatt som pågår i svensk massmedia angåendearbetsintegration i Sverige. De frågeställningar vi sökte svaren på var vad media anser ärproblemet med arbetsintegrationen, hur stort problem media anser att det är samt vilkalösningsförslag media lyfter angående arbetsintegrationen.Vår undersökning gjordes på tre stora svenska dagstidningar med olika politiska inriktningar.Dessa tidningar är Aftonbladet, Svenska Dagbladet och Dagens Nyheter. Materialet somanalyserades består av 59 artiklar ur dessa tidningar.Studiens teoretiska utgångspunkt är Norman Fairclough kritiska diskurs teori men ävenNorbert Elias teori om etablerade och outsiders. Undersökningen resulterade i fem olikateman, brister i etableringsreformen, ta vara på kompetenser, språket är viktigt, gemensammakrafter för integration samt hierarki och utanförskap.Resultatet visar på att massmedia anser att det finns problem med den arbetsintegration vi hari Sverige idag. Media belyser att det finns brister i den integrationspolitik som bedrivs i dag, iform av etableringsreformen, och de är negativa till denna. Det visar även på att Sverigemåste bli mer solidariskt och ta till vara på de resurser som de nyanlända kommer med. Vi fårinte låta de nyanlända hamna i ändlösa insatser utan se varje nyanländ som en individ sommed lite hjälp kan bidra till vår svenska välfärd och arbetslinje. Resultatet visar även att statenmåste ta ett mer långsiktigt ansvar samtidigt som det måste bli ett bättre samarbetetillsammans med de kommuner som finns i landet.

  • 290.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköpings universitet.
    Demokrati och nationella fantasier: Föreställningar om identitet och tillhörighet i studier av demokrati2001In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 38, no 3-4, p. 40-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Democracy and national imagination: assumptions of  identity and belonging in studies on democracy

    Until recently, questions of migration and ethnic relations were hardly discussed within political research on democracy. Categories such as ‘nation’, ‘culture’ and ‘ethnicity’ have been taken for granted, looked upon as self-evident and independent factors. Research on democracy has generally been permeated by what might be called ‘national imagination’, a nation-state-centred and ethnocentric paradigm, where homogenous national belongings and national borders have been assumed, advocated and legitimated as fundamental elements of political life. Within this kind of paradigm, ethnic minorities have been represented as fundamentally ‘different’ from the ‘norm ality’, that is ethnic majority populations. In general, phenomenon such as mix of cultures, border-crossing and migration have been portrayed as in itself abnormal, disrupting and problematic features of political life. The conclusion in the article is that it is necessary to question and to challenge hegemonic conceptions of identity and belonging in research on democracy.

  • 291.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Institutionen för samhälls- och välfärdsstudier, Linköpings universitet, Campus Norrköping.
    Hårda nypor för ett mjukt samhälle?: Om medialisering och rasifiering i utspelspolitikens Sverige2010In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 47, no 3, p. 35-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Toughness for a soft society? On medialisation, racialisation and the politics of spin in Sweden

    In recent years, issues concerning the future of “multicultural Sweden” have become a salient feature in Swedish politics. One important actor in recent years’ debates about the problems confronting “multicultural Sweden” is the Swedish Liberal Party. Since the general election of 2002, the party has gained both publicity and electoral support by focusing the question of “integration of immigrants” in terms of assimilation and intensified demands aimed at the “immigrant Others”. In this article, the party’s recent developments in the area of integration policy is analysed within the framework of two general processes in contemporary politics, the politics of racialisation and the medialisation of politics. The party’s successful interventions in the area of integration policy are built on an intimate as well as complex interplay between racialisation and medialisation. The agenda articulated by the party, further, has several similarities with the agenda of “authoritarian populist” movements throughout Europe.

  • 292.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    Linköping University.
    Young people in suburbs feel discriminated, but hopeful2017In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 341-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on research in Swedish multi-ethnic areas, this paper examines discourses of unrest among youth in multi-ethnic, tower-block suburbs. While there is a focus on the mechanisms of racialized social exclusion among the youth, the preoccupation among local actors including social workers, police, principals and representatives of NGOs as is with the ‘area of exclusion’ itself as causing the problems of urban unrest. Such problematizing highlights broader policy changes in Sweden, where the main responsibility for welfare is put on the individual, rather than on the collective and the state.

  • 293.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Linnéuniversitet.
    Slaget om hemmet: Värden, utanförskapanden och förorten som folkhemmets periferi2018In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 55, no 2-3, p. 203-223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The struggle about home. Values, social exclusion and the suburb as the periphery of the People’s home

    In this article, we analyse contemporary discourses about social exclusion in the suburbs. The empirical material is mainly based on speeches of different Swedish political party leaders during the Politician’s Week (politikerveckan) in Almedalen that took place in 2016. By adopting a discursive psychology approach, we have examined the interpretative repertoires and the discursive resources that the party leaders use to frame the suburbs as sites of ”parallel society”, criminality, passivity, gender oppression, radicalization and dominance of values that assumingly pose a threat to the social cohesion of Swedish society and the basis of the People’s Home. In order to remediate the ”crisis of values” in Swedish society that migration and social exclusion of suburbs have supposedly engendered, ”Swedish values” are highlighted as important resources to strengthen social cohesion and reclaim the endangered People’s Home. Thus, values are gradually becoming primary markers of difference and deployed to construct hierarchies of belonging and rights in the Swedish society.

  • 294. Dahlstedt, Magnus
    et al.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Salmonsson, Lisa
    Medborgarskap och tillhörighet i migrationens tid – inledande reflektioner2017In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 5-10Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 295.
    Dahlstedt, Magnus
    et al.
    Linköpings universitet.
    Fejes, Andreas
    Linköpings universitet.
    Olson, Maria
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Educational Work.
    Rahm, Lina
    Linköpings universitet.
    Sandberg, Fredrik
    Lunds universitet; Linköpings universitet.
    Medborgarskapandets paradoxer: Medborgarskapspositioneringar i berättelser om tillhörighet i migrationens tid2017In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 54, no 1, p. 31-50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Paradoxes of citizen formation: Citizenship positioning in stories about belonging in an era of migration

    This article analyzes the formation of citizenship in today’s multi-ethnic Sweden with a particular focus on how migration renders visible existing citizenship ideals, defined in terms of similarity and difference on the basis of ethno-cultural background. Analysing three individual stories of women who have migrated to Sweden, with different biographies and stories of how they ended up in Sweden, the article focuses on negotiations of the boundaries and contents of citizenship in multi-ethnic Sweden. The point of departure for the analysis is a post-structuralist and discursive approach. In all, the stories address the crucial question of who should be included into the social community and on what conditions – and who should be left out? This particular question is also at the very centre of the political debate in today’s Europe. On the one hand, there are strong arguments about the ’death of multiculturalism’ and demands for new forms of ethno-culturally graduated citizenship – also in Sweden. On the other hand, in Sweden as well as in other European countries, claims for the development of a new and more inclusive societal community have been raised, expanding the rights of citizens to accommodating also those who have been excluded from them.

  • 296.
    Dahlström, Edmund
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Agnostiska tankar om döende och död1996In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 33, no 4, p. 5-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some agnostic thoughts about dying and death

    I take my point of departure in an agnostic and liberal view. People should be offered such forms of dying and death that fit their cosmology and views of the good life and death. Not believing in a life after corporal death means emphasising everyday life and social networks. The paper has four themes: 1) The tendency to conceal and deny death as an existential condition of life needs to be analysed and questioned. 2) Dying and death are sequestrated in modem society and should be brought together with everyday life. 3) The medical control and steering of the dying process is based on some evaluative presumption that needs to be elucidated and discussed. 4) Human sciences should give more attention to the social consequences of death and the shaping of such institutional rites of passage from living to dead that consoles, reliefs, confirms, reconciles, reintegrates and supports the immediately involved.

  • 297. Dahlström, Edmund
    Manuel Castells tankar om informationsåldern1999In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 114-124Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 298.
    Dahlström, Edmund
    Göteborgs universitet.
    Sociologi och samhälleliga värderingar. En självbiografisk illustration1997In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 34, no 3, p. 7-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sociology and social values. an autobiographical illustration

    This paper gives a self-biographical illustration of how prevailing ideas and social structures have influenced the directions, presumptions and interpretations of the author’s research and research-results during the post-war period with its radical social changes. The science-, planning- and development-optimistic ideas of the late 1940’s and 1950’s made the author inclined towards a positivistic kind of sociology. The radical critical ideas of the 1960’s and 1970’s influenced the author towards a socialistic optimistic type of sociology focusing on welfare reforms, equality and democracy. The crisis period of the 1980s and 1990s made the author sceptical towards ”fundamentalistic” sociology, characterized by too many presumptions and evaluations. The age of uncertainty requires the invention of a more careful and sensitive critical sociology and new forms of politics beyond the Left and Right that can cope with today’s social problems concerning environmental destruction, global market-processes and global economic crises, ethnic and gender conflicts and the crises of the national welfare state.

  • 299.
    Davishpour, Mehrdad
    Stockholms universitet.
    En bild av kvinnornas försämrade situation i Iran1993In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 47-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A picture of the deteriorating situation for women in Iran

    After the Islamic Revolution in Iran 1978-79, the situation has become much worse for women, in terms of rights and resources. The aim of this article is to describe this change with the help of demographic data and to argue that it is the result of the repressive policy of the Islamic regime and, ultimately, of islamic ideology. In particular, Iranian women suffer from the return to more traditional laws of marriage and from reduced opportunities to get an education, or a job.

  • 300.
    Delibasic, Amina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Foroughi, Michelle
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Sköldberg, Mikaela
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Social Work.
    Boendestöd - en insats som leder till större självständighet: Politikers synpunkter gällande boendestöd och avgifter2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The overall aim of the study was to investigate housing support from a politician’s perspective and why some municipalities chose to introduce a fee for the housing support. Qualitative data collection methods were used in the form of semi-structured telephone interviews with politicians in different municipalities in Sweden. The data collected were analyzed with thematic analysis and divided into four main themes: independence, home help assistance, fees for assistance and support free of charge. The theoretical frame was empowerment theory. The results showed that all municipalities agree that housing support is important in the individual's life and contributes to increased independence. The result showed further that that the municipalities' reasoning differs very much concerning the fees. Some municipalities consider that the municipality's economy is of significant importance when introducing the fees while some considers that the economy has no significance.

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