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  • 301.
    Amanda, Cleeve
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Susan, Atuhairwe
    Makerere Universititet.
    Josaphat, Byamugisha
    Makerere Universitetet.
    Elisabeth, Faxelid
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Klingberg-Allvin, Marie
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Caring Science/Nursing.
    Acceptability and feasability of treating women with misoprostol for incomplete abortion in Uganda2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 302.
    Amcoff, Jan
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Möller, Peter
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Westholm, Erik
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Dör byn när lanthandeln stänger?2011In: Plan, ISSN 0032-0560, no 3, p. 20-23Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 303. Amcoff, Jan
    et al.
    Westholm, Erik
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Human Geography.
    Understanding Rural Change: Demography as a key to the future2007In: Futures: The journal of policy, planning and futures studies, ISSN 0016-3287, E-ISSN 1873-6378, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 363-379Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The last decades have seen a rapidly growing interest in foresight methodology. Methods have been developed in corporate and governmental communication exercises often labelled technology foresight. In reality, these foresights have often drifted into processes of social change, since technological change is hard to foresee beyond what is already in the pipe-line. Forecasting of social change, however, must be based on solid knowledge about the mechanisms of continuity and change. Virtually nothing can be said about the future without relating to the past; foresights and futures studies are about revealing the hidden pulse of history. Hence, the answer to forecasting the future is empirical research within the social sciences. Demographic change has been recognised as a key determinant for explaining social change. Population changes are fairly predictable and the age transition can explain a wide range of socio-economic changes. For rural futures, demographic change is a key issue, since age structure in rural areas is often uneven and also unstable due to migration patterns. A number of policy related questions as well as research challenges are raised as a consequence.

  • 304.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Feedback as a Topic Changing strategy in Japanese TV Discussions: Issues in Intercultural Communication Volume1 Issue 22008In: Journal of Intercultural Communication, ISSN 1404-1634, E-ISSN 1404-1634, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 145-158Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 305.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Feedback as strategy to change Topic and its function in Japanese TV discussion program.2007In: The 20th meeting of The Japanese Association of Sociolinguistic Sciences, Kansai Gakuen University, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 306.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    How they change topics: Empirical study of “supportive” and “negative” speaking styles in mixed-gender conversation: Arizona Linguistics and Anthropology Symposium2008In: Arizona Linguistics and Anthropology Symposium, Tuscon, USA, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 307.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The compensatory style of Feedback on Japanese Inter Relay Chat2011In: Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics (GURT) 2011, Georgetown, Washington DC, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Feedback(FB) has been defined as the 3rd move in the interactional exchange of the Initiation-Response-Follow up structure(Coulthard et al.,1975). In Japanese , it was also defined as a response or reaction to previous statements made by other participants (Takamor, 2004). On the basis of such definisions, the formula and function of FB has also been analyzed. On the other hand, Inter Relay Chat (IRC) is considred as a relativily "Lean" Medium as IRC, based on the data that comprises 5574 utterances taken from "Yahoo Japan" chat rooms. Qualitative analysis clarified that emoticons, the hedge in a form of the alphabet "w", and the verbal play and rhyme can be considred as the unique aspects of IRC in Japanese.

  • 308.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The difference of conceptualization in the Japanese and American occupational meeting - Through examining the pragmatic usage of discourse marker “Oh” and “Att”2012Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The pragmatic usage of each Discourse markers has been analyzed on its pragmaticand semantic meaning on various contexts.  Some research seeks for clarifying only the major usage for the purpose of languagelearning, such as the usage in dictionary. At the other hand, some claims Pragmaticmarkers have a number of different functions depending on the context, questioningwhether they have one meaning or many meanings.  According to Schiffrin (1987), there are two types of discourse markers in Americandiscourse. One of those is the semantic-relevant usage, which focuses on the logicalaspect of markers, such as”because”, “so” or “but”. The other one is the markers suchas “well” or “oh”, which are relatively supposed not to be logical and rather their mainfocus is on the emotional or turn-management effect.  Especially as for the discourse marker “oh”, though it belong to the latter type,Schiffrin (1987) notifies all of 6 main usages from pragmatic (strong emotional state)to semantic are based on the information management task, regardless of detailedclassification inside it.  Except the usage of each marker, this research also focuses on the perspective of“genre discourse analysis”, as a scale to examine discourse markers. Genre is aperspective to analyse discourse, and the definition of which is suggested by Bensonand Greaves (1981), as “the type of activity in which the discourse operates its content,idea and institutional focus”.  This research sets the “occupational meeting “on Japanese and American as the typeof activity, and aims to find the difference of “concept of meeting” and thus “theconceptualisation of Japanese politeness reflected in the “wakimae” principle, byinvesting the pragmatic usage of “oh” American and Japanese speakers choose.As the methodology, based on 500 turns from the speech setting of “meeting” and“casual conversation” on both of American and Japanese corpus, the marker to show“surprise” are extracted respectively and further divided to 6 usage along theSchiffrin’s categorization and then cross-examined.  Consequently the result is found as next:1. “Strong emotional state” such as showing the surprise or fear, the most pragmaticusage is frequently found in American corpus and the frequency doesn’t showany difference when the setting changed from the casual conversation to themeeting. Whereas it was rare to find same usage in Japanese especially inmeeting.2. The most pragmatic usage, which just collocates with feedback to answer, isfound frequently in Japanese especially in the meeting.3. The usage that focus on information management aspect as “repair” or “requestof clarification” increase in American meeting, compared to that in casualconversation, In contrast, the opposite tendency is found in Japanese counterparts.  In conclusion, negotiations of debating aspect are mainly cantered in Americanmeetings, in which the exchanges of the difference in information they have obtainedare focused. However in Japanese, the main issue are replaced by wakimae(discretion),which require the participants to choose certain formality of the conversational settings.

  • 309.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The framework to analyze the discourse in Adobe Connect base class- room environment: How the interaction on the web promotes the acquisition of learners2011In: / [ed] Amino, Kaoru, Yokohama National University, 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 310.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The function of Feedback and Emcee’s role in Japanese TV discussion program2008In: Social and Cultural Studies, ISSN 1175-7132, Vol. 24, p. 1-11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 311.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The pragmatic usage of contrastive connectives as Turn-Taking strategies in Japanese conversation2007In: Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics 2007 (GURT 2007), Georgetown, USA, 2007Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 312.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The subjectivity and Sentence Final Particles in the citation clause: Re-Construct their story in Japanese mass-media2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 313.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The Turn-Taking strategy and its function in Japanese conversation: The 3rd meeting in Chubu district of The Society for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language2005In: The society for Teaching Japanese as a Foreign Language, Kinjo Gakuen University, 2005Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 314.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    The uses of contradictory conjunctions in Japanese and American Corpuses: Context Analysis from three perspectives; semantic, diverted and developed usages2010In: The Pragmatics Society of Japan, Osaka, 2010Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 315.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Topic Closing expression before Topic-Shift: Genre and its influence in formula and function2008In: The 21th meeting of The Japanese association of Sociolinguistic Sciences, Tokyo Joshi University, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 316.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Humanities and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Turn the technique in Visual arts into literature: Dramatic effect in Akutagawa works and the management of tense2013In: / [ed] Takahashi Tatsuo, International Society for Akutagawa Ryūnosuke Studies , 2013, , p. 19Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The works of Akugatawa has been evaluated to connote the Drama-like expressiveness, which enables readers to perceive his works as if they are watching the visual arts as film or play.

    Elaine (1997) analyse those characteristic of Akutagawa works, and suggested the resemblance of it with the technique called as "Montage (Eisenstein, cited in Aumont, 1987)"used in some Visual Arts. Accordinng to Einstein, this technique is the "juxtaposition of two fragments resembles their product more than it does their sum", in which each scene is carefully framed and accumulated one after another, as if it is Kaleidoscope.

    In this research, those carefully accumulated scenes and its shifts are focused on, and how two elements, the narration by the protagonist’s view and the description of what happens are structured in each novel are examined. As well, the relevance of the shifts of scenes and how "tense" as syntactic element are differently managed are also subjects to be examined, based on his two works "Toshisyun" and "Torokko".

    To look into the usage of tense in "Toshisyun", "-ta form (past tense)" is used in the dialogue at the opening part as narration, in other hands, "-ru form (present tense)" is shown in the descriptive part.

    Same tendency is also shown in "Torokko". "-ta form (past tense)" is used the monologue by protagonist at the opening part, however the "-ru form (present tense) "is used in the descriptive part, which is actually considered to precede the narrative part chronologically.

    One reason of these contradicted usages of tense could due to the expressional effect of present form in Japanese. Maynard (2005) implies the descriptive effect of present tense as the vividness that gives readers the sensation of chronological and physical closeness to the event shown in the narrative.

    These two works also shows the structural equivalence; In addition to the usage of tense in the monologue or dialogue part in opening, "-ta form (past tense)" is also used in the closing part. This structural accordance of tense makes readers to refrain a scene, which has already been submitted. Ricio (2007) suggested the same technique in films as "flash forward". Thus management of tense in Akutagawa could realize the expressional means in visual arts in the literature, and it could be one element of Drama -characteristic in his works.

    [References]

    Aumont,J.(1998).Montage Eisenstein, London and Bloomington Publisher (BFI).

    Elaine Gerbert (1997). A new look: The Influence of Vision Technology on Narrative in Taisho, In

    Haruko Minegishi Cook, Kyoko Hijirida, Mildred M. Tahara, eds., New Trends and Issues in

    Teaching Japanese Language and Culture, Volume 3, Issue 15, Second Language Teaching and

    Curriculum Center University of Hawai’I ,pp 15-30.

    Maynard, Senko, K. (2005) Danwa Hyogen handbook, Kuroshio publisher, Tokyo.

    Rocio Montoro (2007). Analysing Literature through Films, In Greg Watson and Sonia Zyngier, eds.,

    Literature and Stylistics for Language Learners: Theory and Practice, Palgrave macmillan,Finland,

    pp48-59.

  • 317.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Turn-Taking strategies and style shift by gender difference: Linguistic convention and its obligation2008In: The Japanese association of Sociolinguistic Sciences, Tokyo Joshi University, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 318.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Turn-Taking Strategy and Style-Shift in Japanese Women2009In: Proceedings of the 5 th Biennial International Gender and Language Association Conference IGALA 5, held at Victoria University of Wellington, July 2008, Wellington, New Zealand: Victoria University of Wellington , 2009, p. 225-239Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines gender differences and style-shifting of women in turn-taking (TT) strategies during Japanese conversations; such strategies appear when there is a new shift in conversation. Specifically, the article explores the gender difference in TT strategies and whether a woman’s TT strategy changes in accordance with the interlocutor’s gender. This article suggests that women have varying conversational styles that are rather similar to those of men. The following tendencies were observed in the TT strategies of men and women. First, in the TT strategies adopted toward male interlocutors, females exhibited supportive tendencies, such as involving men in the conversation or actively responding to them. Second, the TT strategies adopted by males toward female interlocutors revealed negative elements such as the use of blunt responsive markers or first person pronouns. Third, in the TT strategies adopted toward female interlocutors, females displayed relatively negative tendencies, using blunt or simple TT strategies in comparison to those seen in the conversations between males and females. The article then discusses the implications of these findings as women do not innately possess supportive conversational styles and simply converse in accordance with their gender role. In particular, the discussion focuses on the possibility that the socialization of women also compels them to follow linguistic socialization, which reflects a woman’s customary role to engage in assistant work.

  • 319.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    Turn-Taking Strategy in Japanese CMC2009In: Studies in Language and Cultures, ISSN 1341-0032, Vol. 24, p. 47-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [un]

    IRC (Inter Relay Chat) falls under the form of media called CMC (Computer-mediated communication); however, this form of media lacks such features as co-presence and simultaneity (Lark and Brennan, 1991). Therefore, CMC is said to be a limited form of media, compared to face-to-face communication (King, 1996). With regard to CMC, studies on turn-taking systems have been examined in the Western context. Hence, in this paper, I would like to argue that, to some extent, Japanese CMC has its own turn-taking system. One of the unique characteristics of the Japanese turn-taking system is the coconstruction of turns by more than two participants, in which one of the participants utters only the former part of the statement, anticipating that the latter part will be completed by the other participants (Mizutani, 1993). In Japanese, co-construction is possible partly because of the language's syntactic structures, in which syllables can easily be attached one after the other. This type of construction is called turn-projectability and the individual part of a sentence is called TCU (Turn Construction Unit; Szatrowski, 1993). Focusing on TCU, this paper studies how a turn is taken and examines how turn-taking in IRC is different from that in face-to face communication. On the basis of 3000 turns extracted from the IRC of “Yahoo Japan,” I first counted the frequency of turn-taking strategy by initiations, such as connectives, fillers, and responsive markers as discourse markers, and then compared it with the frequency of turn-taking strategy found in face-to-face communication. Consequently, it was clarified that the initiations in CMC are not as frequent as they are in face-to-face conversation. A further observation of the data showed that TCU tends to appear instead of initiation. Through a qualitative analysis of each TCU, it can be said that primer turn, which ends in the topical marker “wa,” draws a response from other participants in the cyber community and makes the community livelier. Furthermore, in the case of a narrative, a participant connects each turn by using the conjunctive suffix “-te,” in order to draw the other's response to the story, thus contributing to the vividness of communication in cyber space. In conclusion, TCU effectively compensates for the leanness of CMC, and the various TCU can be unique and powerful tools for turn-taking strategy in Japanese CMC.

  • 320.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    When men use feminine sentence final particles: the act of deviating from the classical citation rule in narratives2008In: Georgetown University Round Table on Languages and Linguistics 2008 (GURT 2008), Georgetown, Washington DC, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 321.
    Amino, Kaoru
    Dalarna University, School of Languages and Media Studies, Japanese.
    話者交替と話題転換に関する言語表現: -場面・性別・メディアが言語表現に与える影響-2009Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
  • 322.
    Amnå, Erik
    Göteborg University.
    More Representation or More Participation?: Challenges in Swedish Democracy2003In: Building a Human Rights Culture: South African and Swedish Perspectives / [ed] Karin Sporre & H Russel Botman, Falun: Högskolan Dalarna, 2003, p. 102-126Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 323.
    Andersen, Kasper
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Lind, Lars
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ingelsson, Erik
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Medical Science. Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Byberg, Liisa
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Michaëlsson, Karl
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sundström, Johan
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Skeletal muscle morphology and risk of cardiovascular disease in elderly men2015In: European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, ISSN 2047-4873, E-ISSN 2047-4881, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: While it is well known that physical inactivity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease, there is still a search for the mechanisms by which exercise exerts its positive effect. Skeletal muscle fibre type can be affected to some extent by exercise, and different fibre types possess different anti-inflammatory and glucometabolic properties that may influence cardiovascular disease risk.

    DESIGN: Population-based cohort study.

    METHODS: We investigated relations of skeletal muscle morphology to risk of cardiovascular events in a sample of 466 71-year-old men without cardiovascular disease, of which 295 were physically active (strenuous physical activity at least 3 h/week).

    RESULTS: During a median of 13.1 years of follow up, 173 major cardiovascular events occurred. Among physically active men, 10% higher proportion of type-I (slow-twitch oxidative) fibres was associated with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.74-0.95) for cardiovascular events, and 10% higher proportion of type-IIx (fast-twitch glycolytic) fibres was associated with a HR of 1.24 (1.06-1.45), adjusting for age. Similar results were observed in several sets of multivariable-adjusted models. No association of muscle fibre type with risk of cardiovascular events was observed among physically inactive men.

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher skeletal muscle proportion of type-I fibres was associated with lower risk of cardiovascular events and a higher proportion of type-IIx fibres was associated with higher risk of cardiovascular events. These relations were only observed in physically active men. Skeletal muscle fibre composition may be a mediator of the protective effects of exercise against cardiovascular disease.

  • 324.
    Andersen, Martin
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Energy Technology. Chalmers University of Technology.
    Bales, Chris
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Energy Technology.
    Dalenbäck, Jan-Olof
    Chalmers University of Technology.
    Techno-Economic Analysis of Solar Options for a Block Heating System2016In: Conference Proceedings: Eurosun 2016, Palma De Mallorca: International Solar Energy Society, 2016, , p. 16Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An innovative small solar district heating system with one central heating plant and four solar substations has been built in Vallda Heberg, Sweden, to supply a new housing area with passive houses. The target solar fraction was 40% and the total system design, including heat distribution in the buildings, was based on previous experience and aimed to be simple and cost-effective. The main aim of this study was to determine whether the system can be designed in a more effective manner by change of distribution system and load density. TRNSYS models were calibrated against measured data and then used to predict the energy performance. Results indicate that lower distribution heat losses can be obtained by change to a distribution concept with lower operating temperatures, while potentially reducing cost. Changes in heat density cause reduced distribution losses and boiler supplied heat demand, with only minor effects on solar system yield.

  • 325.
    Anderson, Mats
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Mechanical Engineering.
    Artursson Wissa, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Avdic, Anders
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Oom Gardtman, Ulf
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Education.
    Skogbergs, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Graphic Arts Technology.
    Formativ feedback i högre utbildning: Inventering, förslag och organisatorisk implementering2018Report (Other academic)
  • 326.
    Anderson, Mats
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Mechanical Engineering.
    Artursson Wissa, Ulrika
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Avdic, Anders
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Oom Gardtman, Ulf
    Dalarna University, School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Education.
    Skogbergs, Anna
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Graphic Arts Technology.
    Formativ feedback i högre utbildning: Inventering, förslag och organisatorisk implementering2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 327.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems. Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Increasing interactivity in distance educations: Case studies Bangladesh and Sri Lanka2010In: Information Technology for Development, ISSN 0268-1102, E-ISSN 1554-0170, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 16-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper describes how distance educations in developing countries can enhance interactivityby means of information and communication technologies. It is argued that e-learning involvesa shift in the educational structure from traditional transmission of knowledge to interactivecreation of knowledge. Our case studies are two distance educations in Bangladesh and SriLanka that use different technologies for implementing interactivity; Internet and computersin one case and video and mobile phones in the other. The findings are analyzed based onStructuration Theory and we compare the two approaches based on emerging norms andbeliefs. Findings from both cases show the concurrent enactment of both the transmissionand the interactive structure. Whereas peer collaboration and the use of self-assessment toolsmake students take more ownership of their learning, we also found the idea of a classroomwith an instructive teacher to be deeply rooted in the students’ minds.

  • 328.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro Universitet.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems.
    Victim, Mother, or Untapped Resource? Discourse Analysis of the Construction of Women in ICT Policies2017In: Information Technologies & International Development, ISSN 1544-7529, Vol. 13, no 2017, p. 72-86Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the construction of women in national ICT policies in South and Southeast Asia. The aim is to unravel the role ascribed to women in these policies and how this affects suggested measures. The research is based on critical discourse analysis and shows that women are mainly constructed as victims, mothers, or an untapped resource. We argue that if women are speciªcally targeted in policies, careful attention should be given to how they are portrayed. Our analysis also shows that in most cases the suggested solutions on how to include women in the ICT society only deal with the symptoms of gender inequality rather than the structures that prevent equal opportunities. We conclude by discussing implications for research and practice.

  • 329.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems. Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    What are we doing?: theories used in ICT4D research2013In: 12th International Conference on Social Implications of Computers in Developing Countries / [ed] Niall Hayes, Renata Lèbre La Rovere, 2013, p. 282-300Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 330.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems. Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Grönlund, Åke
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    Wiklund, Matilda
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Reclaiming the students: coping with social media in 1: 1 schools2014In: Learning, Media & Technology, ISSN 1743-9884, E-ISSN 1743-9892, Vol. 39, p. 37-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a debate about the advantages and disadvantages of using social media in education. Drawing on interviews and surveys with students and teachers in three Swedish schools, this study finds that studentsas well as teachers find much of the students' social media use distractive to learning. We investigate this by means of an interpretative study of students' and teachers' experiences. We find that concerns relate to how social media use makes students less social, how weaker students are more likely to get distracted, how teachers lack strategies for tackling the problem and how the responsibility of the use is delegated to the students. We discuss how the distractive use of social media is made possible as a result of education policies requiring a higher degree of individual work, individual responsibility, and educational choices forstudents. Teachers and school leaders need to jointly reclaim the students and coping strategies for the distractive use are urgently needed.

  • 331.
    Andersson, Annika
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro Universitet.
    Wiklund, Matilda
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för humaniora, utbildnings- och samhällsvetenskap.
    Hatakka, Mathias
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Information Systems. Örebro universitet, Handelshögskolan vid Örebro universitet.
    Emerging Collaborative and Cooperative Practices in 1:1 Schools2016In: Technology, Pedagogy and Education, ISSN 1475-939X, E-ISSN 1747-5139, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 413-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we explore how laptops used in 1:1 classrooms affect cooperation and collaboration practices. Based on an observational time study we find that the most common activity in 1:1 classrooms is group work using the computer. We also found that despite what the concept 1:1 alludes about one student working with one computer, most laptop use takes on other forms such as two students working with one computer (1:2) or two students working together using two laptops (2:2). The findings reported in this paper about the various different collaboration arrangements have implications for both research and practice. Practice because teachers can arrange activities based on an awareness of the different student-laptop constellations that emerge when students are given a laptop. Research is likewise informed about the various group work constellations and can build on this knowledge for further analysis of the pros and cons with the different collaborative forms. 

  • 332.
    Andersson, Anton
    et al.
    Stockholm University.
    Edling, Christofer
    Lunds University.
    Rydgren, Jens
    Stockholm University.
    "In Sweden we shake hands" - but are we really2017In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 54, no 4, p. 377-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivated by a recent controversy over handshaking, a survey of the personal networks of young Swedes (n=2244) is used to describe greeting practices across social class, gender, immigrant background, and geographic location. While greeting practices in the sample are fairly uniform, there are also important differences. Handshaking is predominantly used by respondents with an immigrant background, men and women distinguish between greetings depending on the gender of the person they are greeting, and greeting practices differ between northern and southern Sweden as well as between rural and urban areas.

  • 333.
    Andersson, Björn
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Business Administration and Management.
    Hugosson, Mårten
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Business Administration and Management.
    Maberg, Hanna
    Dalarna University, School of Technology and Business Studies, Business Administration and Management.
    Företagsformens betydelse för nyföretagande: En jämförande studie mellan ekonomiska föreningar och aktiebolag2013Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka nyföretagares motivgrund för val av företagsform avseende formerna ekonomisk förening och aktiebolag. Syftet är också att söka belysa några av de skillnader i bemötande som finns gentemot företagare vilka bedriver sina verksamheter i formerna ekonomisk förening respektive aktiebolag. Bakgrunden till studien är en rådande uppfattning om att ekonomiska föreningar ibland inte bemöts och behandlas på samma sätt som andra företagsformer vid kontakt med intressenter. Många ekonomiska föreningar är verksamma inom den s.k. sociala ekonomin och då den sociala ekonomin i Sverige är en växande sektor, både vad gäller antal sysselsatta och omsättning, där den sistnämnda uppgår till ca 350 miljarder om året, är ämnet intressant att undersöka. 

    I studien genomfördes djupintervjuer med företagsrepresentanter från åtta ekonomiska föreningar samt sju aktiebolag samt ett företag med erfarenhet från bådadera. Respondenterna fick bl.a. besvara frågor med avseende på vilka motiv de haft för valet av företagsform, hur de upplevt bemötande från intressenter samt vilka för- och nackdelar de upplever sig ha fått av sitt val. 

    Från svaren framkommer att flera av de som driver ekonomiska föreningar gör detta för att de känner att det är bra alternativ om man vill driva företag tillsammans samt om man vill ha en, vad de uppfattar, mer demokratisk form för sitt företagande. Formen sågs också som ett hjälpmedel för att skapa delaktighet och ett bättre samarbete. Med formen ekonomisk förening kom även nackdelar som inte upplevdes hos aktiebolagens företrädare. De främsta nackdelar som framkom var att vissa intressenter, t.ex. banker och kreditinstitut bemöter ekonomiska föreningar med skepsis; det finns en osäkerhet kring vad formen medför och innebär. Det framkom även att viktiga intressenter och aktörer har en okunskap om ekonomiska föreningar vilket kan påverka bemötandet negativt. I vissa fall lämnar inte affärssystem och rutiner något utrymme för att hantera ekonomiska föreningar.

  • 334.
    Andersson, Catharina
    Dalarna University, School of Education and Humanities, Educational Work.
    Fler män till skolan: en studie av ett försök att locka män till skolan2005Report (Other academic)
  • 335.
    Andersson, Catharina
    Dalarna University, School of Education and Humanities, Educational Work.
    More men to school. Becoming Teachers in a Learning Organization: Meeting the Challenges of the Learning Society2003In: ATEE Conference, Malta, 2003Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 336.
    Andersson, Catharina
    et al.
    Dalarna University, School of Education and Humanities, Educational Work.
    Lundgren, Mats
    Dalarna University, School of Education and Humanities, Educational Work.
    Distance teacher education – some experiences from Dalarna University, Sweden Paper presented at the 33rd Annual ATEE Conference Brussels, Belgium, 23rd – 27th August 20082008In: ATEE, Bryssel, 2008Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Distance teaching is now-a-days used in different shapes. However, it is something different from traditional campus organised education as it systematically uses Information Communication Technology (ICT) as a key element. When the distance teacher education started in Sweden many teacher educators doubted the wisdom of this. They expressed that the educational process to become a teacher would be deteriorated. For instance, they feared for high drop out rates and difficulties to examine in a proper way. The Swedish National Agency for Higher Education has recently edited a report that showed that this form of teacher education was well adapted to the labour market, but the possibilities for the teacher students to shape their education were relatively limited. However, we still know quite little about the effects of this way to educate teacher students. This paper explores the possibility of using distance teacher education. In a case study 20 students, who were the first to finish a complete a distance teacher education at Högskolan Dalarna, were asked in a questionnaire how they had apprehended their education. We also interviewed four of these students, as well as five teacher educators. One of our findings were that the distance teacher education reached new target groups, who not had been able to participate in university studies if it not had been offered in this form. Especially, this was valid for the middle-aged women, living a long distance away from a university, with social responsibilities for children or old parents. Other findings were that these students in general were target oriented and ambitious, wrote more than the campus students and developed that kind of skill better. Marratech, an ICT system for small groups, e-mail and chat were used for the communication. Marratech was considered to permit free and spontaneous communication, both of the teacher educators and the students. Initially the teacher educators were sceptical to distance teacher education, but afterwards they were surprised of how well it had worked. They declared that they had better and nearer contact with their students and more control over the students´ performance, but some parts of the teacher education were better suitable for campus education, for example, power of creating characters. Distance teacher education was considered time consuming and demanded much activity from the teacher educators as the students wanted rapid responses. This study indicates that distance teacher education works well for mature individuals with high motivation. However, it demands more time from the teacher educators, but it gives in general good results. Still, there are pedagogical challenges to overcome. Maybe we should reflect on a mix of distance teacher education and campus based teacher education, instead of separated ways of accomplishing teacher education?